Valentino

Synopsis: In 1926 the tragic and untimely death of a silent screen actor caused female moviegoers to riot in the streets and in some cases to commit suicide - that actor was Rudolph Valentino. Ballroom dancer Valentino manipulated his good looks and animal-like grace into a Hollywood career. His smouldering love making, tinged with a touch of masterful cruelty, expressed a sexuality which was at once both shocking and sensual.
Genre: Biography, Drama
Director(s): Ken Russell
Production: Classic Productions
  Nominated for 3 BAFTA Film Awards. Another 1 nomination.
 
IMDB:
6.2
Rotten Tomatoes:
50%
R
Year:
1977
128 min
30 Views

(# RICHARD DAY LEWIS:

"There's A New Star In Heaven Tonight")

# Stars may come and stars may go

# Up there in that starry space

# But when one falls, God always calls

# A star to take its place

# There's a new star in heaven tonight

# That will never fade from our sight

# There's a new star at home

# In that far starry dome

# Shining down on his loved ones tonight

# There's a voice singing,

"Lead, kindly light"

# With a smile

that has made the world bright

# Valentino, goodbye

# But way up in the sky

# There's a new star in heaven tonight

# There's a voice singing,

"Lead, kindly light"

# With a smile

that has made the world bright

# Valentino, goodbye

# But way up in the sky

# There's a new star in heaven

# Tonight #

(People shouting)

We want Rudy! We want Rudy...!

(Horse whinnying)

Personally, fellas,

I'm tickled pink by this turnout.

They're squeezing out of the subways

like pomade out of a tube.

Sure, why not? It's free, ain't it?

But how long is it gonna last?

He oughta taken better care of himself.

A lousy appendix!

He should've layed off the booze, too.

The moment he goes into the ground,

our grosses go with him.

Right, so before they take him out of here,

we gotta re-release his movies

into every theatre in the country.

That's why I got the lab working night and

day, grinding out reprints of The Sheik.

Which labs?

Better not be Pathe, Jesse - I got

Son ofthe Sheik running through there.

Listen, we've all got to get together on this.

Cash in on this publicity, but quick.

All right, so what's the angle?

We're getting outta here!

(Crowd chanting)

We want Rudy! We want Rudy!

(Glass breaking, sirens wailing)

(Man) Mr McBride!

Mr McBride!

Hold this, sir.

Sorry to bother you, Mr McBride.

There's a guy here,

says he has to see you, sir.

Say sweetie, you look kinda cute

all alone with your posy.

Make a nice picture.

- How about a big smile?

- Leave me alone.

Hey, don't I know...

I know who you are!

Hey, but I'll keep it under my hat.

You wouldn't want those vultures

to get their hooks into you.

How about it, Bianca, huh?

A little exclusive about you and Rudy?

Exclusive? It was splashed across

every newspaper in the country.

Yeah, that was over ten years ago.

Then it didn't matter.

He was just an immigrant bumming

around New York, nothing but a gigolo.

He was not a gigolo.

He was a professional dancer.

Pretty risky, playing around

with someone like you,

somebody married to a big noise

in the rackets.

It was perfectly innocent.

We were just two lonely foreigners

finding a little companionship

on the dancefloor.

Oh, yeah?

I heard all about the private lessons.

Hey, that's great.

Now take a big sniff of the pansies.

They're violets!

Too bad. But from what I hear,

pansies would've been more appropriate.

(# Orchestra plays tango)

Ma che bravo!

Bianca, forgive me.

(Speaks Italian)

- I forgot the time.

- Very fortunate for me.

That was so exciting to watch.

Rudy, is this gentleman

who I think he is?

Oh, yes. Sorry.

This is Vaslav Nijinsky.

Signor Nijinsky, this is my very dear friend

Bianca de Saulles.

Enchante.

If you could've just seen him tripping

the light fantastic with that ballet dancer,

you'd have gone bananas.

Talk about

Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy.

(Man) 'Bianca was dancing

with the fairy?'

No, she didn't dance with the fairy.

I'm talking about Valentino.

'Why, did they f*ck?'

They looked as though they were

crazy about one another.

'Valentino and the fairy?'

No, not Valentino and the fairy.

Valentino and your wife.

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Ken Russell

Henry Kenneth Alfred Russell (3 July 1927 – 27 November 2011) was an English film director, known for his pioneering work in television and film and for his flamboyant and controversial style. His films in the main were liberal adaptations of existing texts, or biographies, notably of composers of the Romantic era. Russell began directing for the BBC, where he made creative adaptations of composers' lives which were unusual for the time. He also directed many feature films independently and for studios. He is best known for his Oscar-winning film Women in Love (1969), The Devils (1971), The Who's Tommy (1975), and the science fiction film Altered States (1980). Russell also directed several films based on the lives of classical music composers, such as Elgar, Delius, Tchaikovsky, Mahler, and Liszt.Film critic Mark Kermode, speaking in 2006, and attempting to sum up the director's achievement, called Russell, "somebody who proved that British cinema didn't have to be about kitchen-sink realism—it could be every bit as flamboyant as Fellini. Later in his life he turned to making low-budget experimental films such as Lion's Mouth and Revenge of the Elephant Man, and they are as edgy and 'out there' as ever".Critics have accused him of being obsessed with sexuality and the Catholic Church. more…

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Submitted on August 05, 2018

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"Valentino" Scripts.com. STANDS4 LLC, 2019. Web. 20 Oct. 2019. <https://www.scripts.com/script/valentino_22691>.

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