The Unknown Man

Synopsis: Prominent attorney Brad Mason takes on the defense of Rudi Walchek, a young hit-man hoodlum accused of murder. Convinced of the youthful thug's innocence, Mason get him acquitted. Later, he learns from the murder-victim's father that Walchek is a low-level member of a protection-racket gang and was undoubtedly guilty. Mason is anxious to get the gang-leader, but when he discovers it is the eminently respected head of the city's Crime Commission, he feels that a conviction in a court-of-law would be impossible. In a rage, he kills the man, but all evidence, including the murder weapon points to Walchek. When the latter is again brought to trial, Mason, although he senses a higher justice is at work, feels he must defend him with the best of his ability.
Director(s): Richard Thorpe
Production: MGM
 
IMDB:
6.6
APPROVED
Year:
1951
86 min
5 Views

[ Joe Bucknor narrates: ]

"I work in that building

across the street."

"That's our new Hall of Justice."

"It cost us taxpayers

twelve million dollars."

"Ten million was actually

spent on the building."

"The other two got kinda lost."

"It's that way in our city."

"It always was that way."

"But this is not a story about

corruption. Far from it."

"This story is about justice."

"There she is, up there. With a bandage

over her eyes and pigeons as playmates."

"Human nature being the way it is .."

"The lady can use all the help

she can get around here."

"Officially, that's my job."

"And unofficially, that's Andy Layford."

"Layford is head of the

Citizens Crime Commission."

"Right now, 3:
30 in the afternoon .."

"The Commissioner is taking a look

at Hulderman's on Cedar Street."

"You could know our town a lifetime

without knowing Hulderman's."

"But it so happens a few weeks

ago, his son made news."

"By having a knife plunged

in his back late one evening."

"We don't have the knife,

but we do have the killer."

"At least we believe so."

"The dark, nice-looking guy

between the drunk and the conman."

"That's him."

"This is the attorney's

room in the county jail."

"A prisoner waiting trial .."

"Can ask to see his mouthpiece

here any hour of the day or night."

"That's the boys lawyer,

Wayne Kellwin, sitting opposite."

"At 3:
45, four blocks away."

"A pretty girl is showing

a dinner dress."

"A very pretty girl."

"The look of the lady

may give you ideas."

"But it won't tell you why a young man

is behind bars on a murder rap."

"He is."

"You just saw him."

"Yes, she'll take it."

"She thinks Brad will like it."

"Brad is her husband.

Bradley Masen, attorney at law."

"He'll like it alright."

"They've been married 24 years,

the Bradley Masens."

"But for Stella, Brad still wants

the top of the Christmas tree."

"And he can afford it too."

"The best civil lawyer in town and

one of the finest in the country."

"That's Bradley Masen."

"Mr Kellwin is here, Mr Masen."

Who?

"Wayne Kellwin."

Oh. Have him come in will you please.

Brad.

Wayne.

Well, well. How are you, boy?

It's been a long time.

The class of '25. That makes

it a quarter of a century.

Correct, so help me.

So help us both.

Say, you look great, fellah. You're

getting to look just like your old man.

What more can a guy want?

Well, not a thing if it's true.

Of course it's true.

Sit down over there.

Remember the speech

he gave us at graduation?

I still have a copy of it some place.

Fine words, Brad.

I can't say I've lived up to

them the way you have.

Most of my campus dreams

failed to go the distance.

How? Who says so?

Oh, I'm not kicking. I've done okay.

But you've really made it, fellah.

And they tell me you've kept your

hands clean and you buttons shiny.

How about a drink?

Motion granted.

Is that your boy?

Ah, yes. He's ..

Twenty-three now.

In his last term.

Law school?

Of course.

Of course .. the Masen, Masen line.

I'm hoping he'll join

me here in November.

That will be great for you both.

It will give me a chance

to do the office over.

That might not be a bad idea.

It's a little old-style, conservative.

Don't go changing things

that suit you, Brad.

It tells the world what you are.

It wouldn't do for me of course. But my

clients wouldn't do for you as a rule.

What do you take these days?

All there is, from larceny to murder.

Which, by the way, brings me to you.

Ah ..

What was that you said:

"brings you to me"?

Murder.

Murder?

Has somebody killed somebody?

Somebody has killed somebody.

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Ronald Millar

Sir Ronald Graeme Millar (12 November 1919 – 16 April 1998) was an English actor, scriptwriter, and dramatist.After Charterhouse and studying at King's College, Cambridge, for a year, Millar joined the Royal Navy in 1940, during the Second World War. He established himself as a playwright after the war and, between 1948 and 1954, lived in Hollywood, where he wrote scripts for MGM. On his return to Britain, he successfully adapted several C. P. Snow novels – and, in 1967, William Clark's novel Number 10 – for the stage. He also wrote the book and lyrics for the musical Robert and Elizabeth. He acted as speechwriter for three British prime ministers, including Margaret Thatcher, for whom he wrote the famous line "The lady's not for turning."Millar was the son of a professional actress, Dorothy Dacre-Hill. Prior to becoming a full-time dramatist and then a speechwriter, Millar acted in a number of West End productions during and after World War II, in the company of luminaries as Ivor Novello, Alastair Sim and John Gielgud. He also appeared in the 1943 war film We Dive at Dawn directed by Anthony Asquith. One of his most well-received productions was Abelard and Heloise featuring Keith Michell and Diana Rigg. more…

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Submitted on August 05, 2018

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"The Unknown Man" Scripts.com. STANDS4 LLC, 2019. Web. 23 Oct. 2019. <https://www.scripts.com/script/the_unknown_man_21550>.

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