The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh  Season #3 Episode #3

Synopsis: The film's content is derived from three previously released animated featurettes Disney produced based upon the Winnie-the-Pooh books by A. A. Milne: Winnie the Pooh and the Honey Tree (1966), Winnie the Pooh and the Blustery Day (1968), and Winnie the Pooh and Tigger Too (1974). Extra material was used to link the three featurettes together to allow the stories to merge into each other. A fourth, shorter featurette was added to bring the film to a close, originally made during production of Blustery Day (based on the presence of Jon Walmsley as Christopher Robin). The sequence was based on the final chapter of The House at Pooh Corner, where Christopher Robin must leave the Hundred Acre Wood behind as he is starting school. In it, Christopher Robin and Pooh discuss what they liked doing together and the boy asks his bear to promise to remember him and to keep some of the memories of their time together alive. Pooh agrees to do so, and the film closes with The Narrator saying that wh
Genre: Animation
Year:
1977
16 Views

This could be the room of any small boy, but it just happens to belong to a boy named Christopher Robin. Like most small boys Christopher Robin has toy animals to play with, and they all live together in a wonderful world of make-belief. But his best friend is a bear called Winnie the Pooh or Pooh for short. Now Pooh had some very unusual adventures and they all happened right here in the Hundred Acre Wood.

Deep in the hundred acre wood where Christopher Robin plays

You'll find the enchanted neighborhood of Christopher's childhood days

A donkey named Eeyore is his friend and Kanga and little Roo

There's Rabbit and Piglet and there's Owl, but most of all Winnie the Pooh

Winnie the Pooh

Winnie the Pooh

Tubby little cubby all stuffed with fluff

He's Winnie the Pooh

Winnie the Pooh

Willy nilly silly old bear

Winnie the Pooh (pooh)

Winnie the Pooh (pooh)

Tubby little cubby all stuffed with fluff

He's Winnie the Pooh

Winnie the Pooh

Willy nilly silly old bear

Winnie the Pooh lived in this enchanted forest under the name of Sanders, which means he had the name over the door in gold letters, and he lived under it. Now when Pooh heard his Pooh-coo clock (pooh-coo, pooh-coo, pooh-coo, pooh-coo, pooh-coo, pooh-coo, pooh-coo, pooh-coo) he knew it was time for something, but he was a bear of very little brain, so when he thought he thought in the most thoughtful way he could think.

Haven't thought of anything, have you? No, neither have I. Think, think, think. Oh, yes. Time for my stoutness exercise. Up, down, up

When I up, down, touch the ground

It puts me in the mood,

Up, down touch the ground

In the mood (smack, smack) for food,

I am stout, round and I have found,

Speaking poundage wise,

I improve my appetite

When I exercise.

Oh, stuff and fluff, that's better, thank you, now where was I? Oh yes, I'm rumbly in my tumbly. Time for something sweet.

I am short, fat and proud of that,

And so with all my might

I up, down, up, down to

My appetite's delight!

While I up, down, touch the ground,

I think of things to chew,

(Mmm, like honey, milk, and chocolate)

With a hefty happy appetite,

I'm a hefty happy Pooh.

With a hefty happy appetite,

He's a hefty happy Pooh

Oh, bother! Empty again! Only the sticky part's left.

(Bizzzzz, Buzzzzzz)

That buzzing noise means something, and the only reason for making a buzzing-noise that I know of is because you're a bee! And the only reason for being a bee is to make honey! And the only reason for making honey is so I can eat it.

And so Winnie the Pooh climbed the honey tree. He climbed and he climbed and he climbed, and as he climbed he hummed a little hum.

And I call it my rumbly and my tumbly song.

Yes, and it went something like this:

Hum dum de dum, hum dum de dum,

I'm so rumbly in my tumbly,

Time to munch an early luncheon,

Hum de dum dum dum

Oh I wouldn't climb this tree

If a Pooh flew like a bee,

But I wouldn't be a bear then

So I guess I wouldn't care then!

Bears love honey and I'm a Pooh bear

So I do care, so I'll climb there,

I'm so rumbly in my tumbly,

Time for something, for something... sweet... to eat!

If only I hadn't... You see, what I meant to do... It all comes, I suppose of... liking honey so much. Oh, bother.

Winnie the Pooh crawled out of the gorse-bush, brushed the prickles from his nose and began to think again.

Think, think, think.

And the first person he thought of was -Winnie the Pooh? - No, Christopher Robin! Oh.

Christopher Robin lived in another part of the forest, where he could be near his friends and help them with their problems. On this summer day, gloomy old Eeyore being stuffed with saw-dust had lost his tail again.

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Sam Rogers

The Jungle Book is a 1967 American animated musical comedy film produced by Walt Disney Productions. Based on Rudyard Kipling's book of the same name, it is the 19th Disney animated feature film. Directed by Wolfgang Reitherman, it was the last film to be produced by Walt Disney, who died during its production. The plot follows Mowgli, a feral child raised in the Indian jungle by wolves, as his friends Bagheera the panther and Baloo the bear try to convince him to leave the jungle before the evil tiger Shere Khan arrives. The early versions of both the screenplay and the soundtrack followed Kipling's work more closely, with a dramatic, dark, and sinister tone which Disney did not want in his family film, leading to writer Bill Peet and composer Terry Gilkyson being replaced. The casting employed famous actors and musicians Phil Harris, Sebastian Cabot, George Sanders and Louis Prima, as well as Disney regulars such as Sterling Holloway, J. Pat O'Malley and Verna Felton, and the director's son, Bruce Reitherman, as Mowgli. The Jungle Book was released on October 18, 1967, to positive reception, with acclaim for its soundtrack, featuring five songs by the Sherman Brothers and one by Gilkyson, "The Bare Necessities". The film initially became Disney's second highest-grossing animated film in the United States and Canada,[3] and was also successful during its re-releases. The film was also successful throughout the world, becoming Germany's highest-grossing film by number of admissions.[4] Disney released a live-action adaptation in 1994 and an animated sequel, The Jungle Book 2, in 2003; a live-action remake directed by Jon Favreau was released in 2016. more…

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