The Desperadoes

Synopsis: Popular mailcoach driver Uncle Willie is in fact in league with the town's crooked banker. They plan to have the bank robbed after emptying it, and when Willie's choice for this doesn't show in time, he gets some local boys to do it. When his man does turn up he decides to stick around, as he is pals with the sheriff and also takes a shine to Willie's daughter Allison. This gives the bad men several new problems.
Director(s): Charles Vidor
Production: Sony Pictures Entertainment
 
IMDB:
6.5
APPROVED
Year:
1943
87 min
59 Views


Red Valley! All aboard!

It's empty.

Let's go.

I know how you feel, boys.

Being cleaned out is no joke,

any way you look at it.

Still, there's a good side to this.

I've learned my lesson and so have you.

We sure have, Clanton.

We're through putting our money

in your bank.

Don't forget about them killings, neither.

It's blood money now.

I think you're making a mistake, friends,

as far as my bank is concerned.

Look what I had sent from Salt Lake City.

Say, she's built like a battleship, Clanton.

It'd take a battleship to blow her open,

Uncle Willie.

Just came a little too late though, didn't it?

No! Not at all!

I aim to pay back part of

what everybody lost out of my own pocket.

Are you fooling?

Why, I've got a funny way of fooling.

Mortgaging every thing I have

to raise the money.

I've never heard a banker talk

like that before.

Now, don't thank me!

Don't thank me, friends.

I won't be able to pay you back

more than fifty cents on the dollar.

But at least you don't lose everything...

and I can let you have some cash now

to tide you over.

I invite you to step inside

and do your banking.

That invitation's good enough for me.

Come on, boys. The line forms on the right.

That's the spirit, Uncle Willie.

What's good enough for you ought to be

good enough for everybody in Red Valley.

Pay off everybody 50%.

Need a little money, Mr. McLeod?

I thought I told you

there was to be no killing by Jack Lester.

They'll forget it.

Killing's never forgot,

and it leads to more killing.

- You made a bad mistake, Clanton.

- Why blame me for the killing?

You were supposed to bring in someone

from out of town to do the job.

Sam Glennon in Leadville

was to send me a man.

He was to be here days ago,

but he didn't turn up.

He'd have done a clean job,

from what Sam said.

Maybe so, but we couldn't wait forever.

That's why I called in Jack Lester.

Here's his share.

Finding out he blew an empty safe

must be getting him hot under the collar.

You're a fool, Clanton.

People can stand losing money

but they hunt down killers.

- I told him not to shoot.

- You didn't tell him loud enough.

- Willie, you heard me say...

- Shut up!

You're a great man

in this town now, Clanton.

I guess you're even greater

than Santa Claus.

These suckers will be getting back

half of what they put in...

and naming their children after you.

- How much did we clear?

- $80,000.

That's good.

That calls for a drink on the house.

Here's to your health, Mr. Clanton.

That's not a bad amount

to get out of a town this size.

It's nothing to what we can get later...

if that contract from the army

comes through for the horses.

Santa Claus don't drink.

Whoa.

Hey, Jack! You home? Willie McLeod.

Jack Lester!

- I'm here.

- Hello, Jack.

Morning, gents.

Nice to see you all looking so bright

and happy.

It's gonna be a lovely day.

Jack, I brought you a present.

$10,000, cash money,

and you don't have to thank me.

Looks like you ain't gonna.

You fellas look like you done something

you're ashamed of.

I ought to blow your head off.

- That don't seem like friendly talk.

- Not the least bit friendly.

I don't trust you and Clanton

any more than you trust me.

Why, Jack, where did you ever

get the feeling we didn't trust you?

The other night in the bank.

The minute I found out

I'd blew an empty safe.

- You're a little too smart, Uncle Willie.

- You ain't quite smart enough.

Three men murdered in cold blood.

What's the sense to it?

We was robbing a bank.

I'm a lot older than you, Jack.

In my time I've seen a lot of men

with itchy trigger fingers like you.

They're all in Boot Hill with dirt in their face.

Somebody cured them of that itch.

Would you like a couple of holes

in that big fat belly of yours?

You're holding up the U.S. Mail

and that's a federal offense.

- Hello, Uncle Willie.

- Hello, Sheriff.

You're behind time.

You ought to be in Basin City

with the mail by now.

I've been backtracking to find you.

One of my mules got a loose shoe

and I was held up.

- What you doing in this neck of the woods?

- Just looking around.

Anything special on your mind?

One of the bank robbers forgot something

the other night.

- He did?

- This.

Part of a spur, ain't it?

Hammered silver rowel.

Unusual for this part of the country.

Ever noticed anyone with a pair like them?

No, can't say that I have.

You get around a lot, and I was counting

on you to give me a lead.

When a man gets as old as I am,

his memory goes first.

Maybe some fellow in silver spurs

has passed me...

and neither hear nor see him.

If I do hear or see him,

I don't remember it afterwards.

A man can't do much when he gets old

except save his money.

Stay out of mischief.

Hey, Uncle Willie.

You forgot to give me back

that piece of spur.

Spur? What spur?

That silver-hammered rowel

I picked up in front of the bank.

- You didn't give me no spur.

- Sure I did. Take a look.

Maybe you put it in your pocket.

- Is this it?

- That's it.

That just goes to show you

how forgetful a man of my age can get.

If you hadn't remembered giving it to me...

you probably never would have

got that spur back.

- Don't forget the way home.

- I might any day now.

- So long, Steve.

- So long.

Reach, and don't turn around.

Reach.

I got a lame horse here. We're gonna trade.

- I wouldn't like that.

- That's too bad.

Now don't turn around.

- Anybody here?

- Yes.

- Take care of my horse, ma'am?

- You bet.

Don't usually see a girl running a stable.

Belongs to my father, Will McLeod.

- Did you say McLeod?

- Know him?

Sure. I've heard of him.

Everybody in this part of the country

knows him.

- You from around here?

- Nope.

My name's Allison McLeod.

Pleased to meet you.

I didn't quite catch your name.

I didn't give it.

- Nice horse you got here.

- Yeah.

- Bet you had to pay plenty for him.

- Too much.

Found plenty of dust, too, didn't you?

The north trails are full of it.

And there's red mud

between here and Basin City, too.

- You've seen a lot of country, haven't you?

- Not as much as you.

Red Valley's kind of new to me.

What's it like?

Sleepy and quiet.

Once in a while we raise a crop of horses.

That isn't all.

- Adios, brother.

- Have you known your horse long?

Time doesn't matter.

We fell in love at first sight.

- Isn't that a dangerous habit?

- Not when you get used to it.

I'll be coming back here tonight

to see my horse.

- You be here?

- I'll be waiting.

The Commercial House is a block down.

You'll find that more suitable.

This suits me.

- I'm afraid we have no vacancies.

- Look again.

- I'm very sorry, but...

- Is there anything wrong?

I believe this gentleman has ambitions

beyond his means, Countess.

I think we can afford

a little charity occasionally.

Follow me.

Thank you.

- Cheyenne!

- Take it easy, Countess. I'm only a visitor.

What are you doing here?

There's $10,000 on your head.

- Are you crazy?

- Nitro come in yet?

Rate this script:0.0 / 0 votes

Robert Carson

All Robert Carson scripts | Robert Carson Scripts

0 fans

Submitted on August 05, 2018

Discuss this script with the community:

0 Comments

    Translation

    Translate and read this script in other languages:

    Select another language:

    • - Select -
    • 简体中文 (Chinese - Simplified)
    • 繁體中文 (Chinese - Traditional)
    • Español (Spanish)
    • Esperanto (Esperanto)
    • 日本語 (Japanese)
    • Português (Portuguese)
    • Deutsch (German)
    • العربية (Arabic)
    • Français (French)
    • Русский (Russian)
    • ಕನ್ನಡ (Kannada)
    • 한국어 (Korean)
    • עברית (Hebrew)
    • Gaeilge (Irish)
    • Українська (Ukrainian)
    • اردو (Urdu)
    • Magyar (Hungarian)
    • मानक हिन्दी (Hindi)
    • Indonesia (Indonesian)
    • Italiano (Italian)
    • தமிழ் (Tamil)
    • Türkçe (Turkish)
    • తెలుగు (Telugu)
    • ภาษาไทย (Thai)
    • Tiếng Việt (Vietnamese)
    • Čeština (Czech)
    • Polski (Polish)
    • Bahasa Indonesia (Indonesian)
    • Românește (Romanian)
    • Nederlands (Dutch)
    • Ελληνικά (Greek)
    • Latinum (Latin)
    • Svenska (Swedish)
    • Dansk (Danish)
    • Suomi (Finnish)
    • فارسی (Persian)
    • ייִדיש (Yiddish)
    • հայերեն (Armenian)
    • Norsk (Norwegian)
    • English (English)

    Citation

    Use the citation below to add this screenplay to your bibliography:

    Style:MLAChicagoAPA

    "The Desperadoes" Scripts.com. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 19 Jul 2024. <https://www.scripts.com/script/the_desperadoes_6769>.

    We need you!

    Help us build the largest writers community and scripts collection on the web!

    Watch the movie trailer

    The Desperadoes

    Browse Scripts.com

    The Studio:

    ScreenWriting Tool

    Write your screenplay and focus on the story with many helpful features.


    Quiz

    Are you a screenwriting master?

    »
    What is "subtext" in screenwriting?
    A The literal meaning of the dialogue
    B The background music
    C The visual elements of the scene
    D The underlying meaning behind the dialogue