Taxi Driver script
Taxi Driver (1976)
Synopsis: Suffering from insomnia, disturbed loner Travis Bickle (Robert De Niro) takes a job as a New York City cabbie, haunting the streets nightly, growing increasingly detached from reality as he dreams of cleaning up the filthy city. When Travis meets pretty campaign worker Betsy (Cybill Shepherd), he becomes obsessed with the idea of saving the world, first plotting to assassinate a presidential candidate, then directing his attentions toward rescuing 12-year-old prostitute Iris (Jodie Foster).

TRAVIS BICKLE, age 26, lean, hard, the consummate loner. On

the surface he appears good-looking, even handsome; he has a

quiet steady look and a disarming smile which flashes from

nowhere, lighting up his whole face. But behind that smile,

around his dark eyes, in his gaunt cheeks, one can see the

ominous stains caused by a life of private fear, emptiness

and loneliness. He seems to have wandered in from a land

where it is always cold, a country where the inhabitants

seldom speak. The head moves, the expression changes, but

the eyes remain ever-fixed, unblinking, piercing empty space.

Travis is now drifting in and out of the New York City night

life, a dark shadow among darker shadows. Not noticed, no

reason to be noticed, Travis is one with his surroundings.

He wears rider jeans, cowboy boots, a plaid western shirt

and a worn beige Army jacket with a patch reading, "King

Kong Company 1968-70".

He has the smell of sex about him: Sick sex, repressed sex,

lonely sex, but sex nonetheless. He is a raw male force,

driving forward; toward what, one cannot tell. Then one

looks closer and sees the evitable. The clock sprig cannot

be wound continually tighter. As the earth moves toward the

sun, Travis Bickle moves toward violence.

FILM OPENS on EXT. of MANHATTAN CAB GARAGE. Weather-beaten

sign above driveway reads, "Taxi Enter Here". Yellow cabs

scuttle in and out. It is WINTER, snow is piled on the

curbs, the wind is howling.

INSIDE GARAGE are parked row upon row of multi-colored taxis.

Echoing SOUNDS of cabs idling, cabbies talking. Steamy

breath and exhaust fill the air.

INT. CORRIDOR of cab company offices. Lettering on ajar door

reads:

PERSONAL OFFICE:

Marvis Cab Company

Blue and White Cab Co.

Acme Taxi

Dependable Taxi Services

JRB Cab Company

Speedo Taxi Service

2.

SOUND of office busywork: shuffling, typing, arguing.

PERSONAL OFFICE is a cluttered disarray. Sheets with heading

"Marvis, B&W, Acme" and so forth are tacked to crumbling

plaster wall:
It is March. Desk is cluttered with forms,

reports and an old upright Royal typewriter.

Dishelved middle-aged New Yorker looks up from the desk. We

CUT IN to ongoing conversation between the middle-aged

PERSONNEL OFFICER and a YOUNG MAN standing in front on his

desk.

The young man is TRAVIS BICKLE. He wears his jeans, boots

and Army jacket. He takes a drag off his unfiltered cigarette.

The PERSONNEL OFFICER is beat and exhausted: he arrives at

work exhausted. TRAVIS is something else again. His intense

steely gaze is enough to jar even the PERSONNEL OFFICER out

of his workaday boredom.

PERSONNEL OFFICER (O.S.)

No trouble with the Hack Bureau?

TRAVIS (O.S.)

No Sir.

PERSONNEL OFFICER (O.S.)

Got your license?

TRAVIS (O.S.)

Yes.

PERSONNEL OFFICER

So why do you want to be a taxi

driver?

TRAVIS:

I can't sleep nights.

PERSONNEL OFFICER

There's porno theatres for that.

TRAVIS:

I know. I tried that.

The PERSONNEL OFFICER, though officious, is mildly probing

and curious. TRAVIS is a cipher, cold and distant. He

speaks as if his mind doesn't know what his mouth is saying.

PERSONNEL OFFICER

So whatja do now?

3.

TRAVIS:

I ride around nights mostly.

Subways, buses. See things. Figur'd

I might as well get paid for it.

PERSONNEL OFFICER

We don't need any misfits around

here, son.

A thin smile cracks almost indiscernibly across TRAVIS' lips.

TRAVIS:

You kiddin? Who else would hack

through South Bronx or Harlem at

night?

PERSONNEL OFFICER

You want to work uptown nights?

TRAVIS:

I'll work anywhere, anytime. I know

I can't be choosy.

PERSONNEL OFFICER

(thinks a moment)

How's your driving record?

Rate this script:(3.00 / 2 votes)Say it

Paul Schrader

Paul Joseph Schrader is an American screenwriter, film director, and film critic. Schrader wrote or co-wrote screenplays for four Martin Scorsese films: Taxi Driver, Raging Bull, The Last Temptation of Christ and Bringing Out the Dead. more…

All Paul Schrader scripts | Paul Schrader Books

FAVORITE (0 fans)

Translation

Translate and read this script in other languages:

Select another language:

Discuss this Taxi Driver script with the community:

Citation

Use the citation below to add this screenplay to your bibliography:

Style:MLAChicagoAPA

"Taxi Driver" Scripts.com. STANDS4 LLC, 2017. Web. 16 Dec. 2017. <http://www.scripts.com/script/taxi_driver_69>.

We need you!

Help us build the largest writers community and scripts collection on the web!