Six Degrees Of Separation

Synopsis: New Yorkers Ouisa and Flan Kittredge are upper class private art dealers, pretentious but compassionate. Their prized possession is a double sided Kandinsky, one side that represents control, the other side chaos. They relay a story to their friends and acquaintances that over time becomes legendary. It is their encounter with a young black man who they had never met or heard of but who comes stumbling upon their front door one evening as they are courting an important investor, Geoffrey Miller, who could make them wealthy beyond what they could have dreamed. That black man is Paul Poitier, who has just arrived in the city, was just mugged outside their building and is sporting a minor knife wound to the abdomen. He is a friend of the Kittredge's children, who are attending Harvard, but more importantly is the son of actor/director Sidney Poitier. Tomorrow, Paul is meeting up with his father who is in town directing a movie of "Cats". Beyond the attraction of talking Paul into getting
Genre: Comedy, Drama, Mystery
Director(s): Fred Schepisi
Production: MGM Home Entertainment
  Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 5 nominations.
 
IMDB:
6.9
Metacritic:
72
Rotten Tomatoes:
88%
R
Year:
1993
112 min
94 Views

00:
01:56,520 -- 00:01:58,829

- My God!

- Is anything gone?

2

00:
01:58,960 -- 00:02:02,236

- How can I look? I'm shaking.

- I wanna know if anything's gone.

3

00:
02:02,360 -- 00:02:05,636

- Calm down.

- We could've been killed. The Kandinsky!

4

00:
02:05,760 -- 00:02:09,036

- The Kandinsky!

- It's gone! Oh, my God! Call the police!

5

00:
02:09,160 -- 00:02:11,720

There it is. The silver Victorian inkwell.

6

00:
02:11,840 -- 00:02:14,752

- How can you think about things?!

- There's the inkwell.

7

00:
02:14,880 -- 00:02:18,919

- We could have been murdered!

- Silver jaguar.

8

00:
02:19,040 -- 00:02:20,553

Why?

9

00:
02:20,680 -- 00:02:23,911

- Slashed. Throats slashed.

- There's the Degas.

10

00:
02:24,040 -- 00:02:27,828

Go to bed at night happy and then

murdered. Would we have woken up?

11

00:
02:27,960 -- 00:02:30,394

We're alive.

12

00:
02:30,520 -- 00:02:32,078

- i(dog yelps)/i

- i(both scream)/i

13

00:
02:32,200 -- 00:02:34,839

The dog, the dog, the dog. Oh, God.

14

00:
02:34,960 -- 00:02:36,871

- Oh, my God!

- What is it?

15

00:
02:37,000 -- 00:02:39,434

The wedding.

We have to go to the wedding.

16

00:
02:39,560 -- 00:02:41,471

- I'm in no mood to go.

- We have to.

17

00:
02:41,600 -- 00:02:43,636

- They're your friends.

- I beg to differ...

18

00:
02:43,760 -- 00:02:46,069

- Hello?!

- What?

19

00:
02:46,200 -- 00:02:49,795

You don't call out "hello" unless the...

20

00:
02:50,720 -- 00:02:52,995

I think we could tell

if someone else was here.

21

00:
02:53,120 -- 00:02:54,917

- We didn't all night.

- i(phone rings)/i

22

00:
02:55,040 -- 00:02:57,235

Oh, God. No, don't pick that up! It's him!

23

00:
02:57,360 -- 00:02:58,952

Hello.

24

00:
02:59,200 -- 00:03:00,952

Hello.

25

00:
03:01,840 -- 00:03:03,432

Hello.

26

00:
03:04,360 -- 00:03:05,110

Hello.

27

00:
03:18,080 -- 00:03:19,752

Hello.

28

00:
03:19,880 -- 00:03:22,235

Bride's side or groom's side?

29

00:
03:22,360 -- 00:03:26,148

Either side. I can't even

remember how we met them.

30

00:
03:26,280 -- 00:03:28,271

Why are we here?

31

00:
03:28,400 -- 00:03:30,436

Let's not make a scene.

32

00:
03:32,680 -- 00:03:36,593

The most terrifying words in the world -

33

00:
03:36,720 -- 00:03:40,952

- "Now I lay me down to sleep..." Think.

- "Pray the Lord my soul to keep."

34

00:
03:41,080 -- 00:03:44,231

But then the nightmare part.

"If I should die before I wake..."

35

00:
03:44,360 -- 00:03:45,873

"Pray the Lord my soul to take."

36

00:
03:46,000 -- 00:03:47,911

- Are you OK?

- We were nearly murdered.

37

00:
03:48,040 -- 00:03:50,031

- Throats slashed.

- It was awful.

38

00:
03:50,160 -- 00:03:52,628

- You could've been killed?

- Only hours ago.

39

00:
03:52,760 -- 00:03:54,796

- But we're here.

- We wouldn't miss it.

40

00:
03:54,920 -- 00:03:57,673

Happy the bride the sun shines on.

41

00:
03:57,800 -- 00:04:00,314

i(j& " Here Comes the Bride")/i

42

00:
04:04,240 -- 00:04:08,358

Chaos, control. Chaos, control.

You like? You like?

43

00:
04:15,200 -- 00:04:19,273

- I'll have a gin and tonic, please.

- Tell them.

44

00:
04:19,400 -- 00:04:22,039

We were having

a wonderful evening last night.

45

00:
04:22,160 -- 00:04:24,913

A friend we hadn't seen in years

came by for dinner.

46

00:
04:25,040 -- 00:04:28,555

- Geoffrey Miller. From South Africa.

- Don't say that so portentously.

47

00:
04:28,680 -- 00:04:32,434

- Geoffrey from Serth Efrica.

- Well, don't be gaga!

48

00:
04:32,560 -- 00:04:35,028

- Scotch, please.

- Just something large.

49

00:
04:35,160 -- 00:04:37,720

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John Guare

John Guare (rhymes with "air"; born February 5, 1938) is an Irish American playwright. He is best known as the author of The House of Blue Leaves, Six Degrees of Separation, and Landscape of the Body. His style, which mixes comic invention with an acute sense of the failure of human relations and aspirations, is at once cruel and deeply compassionate. In his foreword to a collection of Guare's plays, film director Louis Malle writes: Guare practices a humor that is synonymous with lucidity, exploding genre and clichés, taking us to the core of human suffering: the awareness of corruption in our own bodies, death circling in. We try to fight it all by creating various mythologies, and it is Guare's peculiar aptitude for exposing these grandiose lies of ours that makes his work so magical. more…

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Submitted on August 05, 2018

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"Six Degrees Of Separation" Scripts.com. STANDS4 LLC, 2019. Web. 18 Nov. 2019. <https://www.scripts.com/script/six_degrees_of_separation_18229>.

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