Love Me Tonight

Synopsis: When Parisienne tailor Maurice Courtelin learns that one of his aristocratic clients, the Viscount Gilbert de Varèze, is a deadbeat who never pays for the merchandise he acquires, he heads off to try and collect what is owed to him. He gets little in the way of cash from the Viscount who is desperate that his uncle, the Duke D'Artelines not learn of his debts. He suggests that Maurice spend a little time at the chateau until the money can be found. The Duke takes an immediate liking to Maurice - who's been introduced as a Baron - but that's not the case for the Princess Jeanette who, after an encounter with him him on the road earlier that day. Over time Jeannette falls in love with him
Director(s): Rouben Mamoulian
Production: Paramount Pictures
  1 win.
 
IMDB:
7.7
Rotten Tomatoes:
100%
PASSED
Year:
1932
104 min
64 Views

Lovely morning song of Paris,

you are much too loud for me.

It's not a sonata by Mozart.

The song of Paris has its faults.

[...]

But at least it's not Viennese waltz.

Seville has its fandango.

Chicago has its trot.

Buenos - there is tango.

Dresden - its gavotte.

No matter [...]

cold, or wet, or dry,

each morning, like a baby,

Paris starts to cry.

It has taxi horns and claxons

to scare the Anglosaxons,

that's the song of Paris.

It has men that send you postcards

much naughtier than most cards,

that's the song of Paris.

The noise is not delicious, but

it makes you so ambitious.

You would sell your wife and daughter,

for just one Latin quarter.

That's the song of Paris.

Bonjour Dubal!

How's my old pal?

Bonjour, Maurice!

How are you?

- How about Friday?

- Friday is my day!

- Oh, what a man!

- How are you?

- How's your bakery?

- I need a beau.

- Where's your husband?

- He needs the dough!

Hello, Mrs. Bendix!

How's your appendix?

And what is more...

How are you?

Bonjour, hello, sir.

How is the grocer?

You owe ten francs,

how are you?

Ah, how's my coy friend?

Some other boyfriend?

- This is my wife!

- How are you?

- How's your grandpa?

- He's back in jail.

- How's your business?

- How can it fail?

Bonjour, Mr. Cohen!

How are things going?

Comment ca va!

How are you?

How are you?

How are you?

Emile! Nice day for your wedding!

- Yes... Is my suit ready?

- Certainly!

- I want to pay you today, Maurice.

- No hurry!

No no no. You're just getting started,

and business is bad.

- Look at these!

- All sold?

One is yours. And the rest are

for the Vicomte de Barres.

The best dressed man in France?

I'm making all his clothes now, and he'll

make my repuation. He owes me 40,000 francs.

That's what I call success!

- That's fine. 2,000 francs, right?

- Right.

Oh, it's the across Paris run!

- Monsieur Vicomte!

- Maurice...

Monsieur Vicomte was in the race?

Just temporarily. Maurice, have you

some of my clothes ready?

- Are fifteen suits enough?

- Well lock the door and give me a suit quickly.

- He may come along any minute.

- Who?

- The girl's husband. He came home unexpectedly.

What girl?

She's... uh... well I don't remember.

The husband started running after me,

and I ran, and I found myself in the race.

I presume Monsieur Vicomte has no more

need of this.

No no, I got it off a fruit stand.

Emile, would you mind giving the room

to Monsieur Vicomte, please?

Yes, yes, with pleasure.

Thank you, thank you, Maurice.

Thank you.

Hey hey. Go right in there.

Monsieur Vicomte...

About the bill...

About the bill,

Monsieur Vicomte...

The pants are a very good fit, Maurice.

Thank you... Monsieur Vicomte, about the bill.

Tonight I will go to my family Chateau

and get my uncle the Duke to hand over

my next allowance.

Thank you, Monsieur Vicomte.

What about my friend,

the shirtmaker, who's making the new

shirts for you?

- Get his bill too.

- Thank you.

What about my friends, the hatter and the bootmaker?

I'll pay them all at once.

A clean sweep, Maurice.

Thank you, Monsieur Vicomte.

Very nice, very nice.

And now, Maurice...

Do you suppose you can let me have

a little something?

- Money?

- Yes, yes...

You see I'm running around

without my wallet.

- A thousand francs?

- No no, that's too much. Now if you said 500...

- Oh, Monsieur Vicomte, take the thousand.

- No no no...

But Monsieur Vicomte, you need it.

Well I'll tell you. You let me have the 2,000

and we'll say no more about it.

Tomorrow, Maurice, I'll be here

with bags of gold for you! Bags of gold!

Rate this script:(5.00 / 1 vote)

Samuel Hoffenstein

Samuel "Sam" Hoffenstein (October 8, 1890 - October 6, 1947) was a screenwriter and a musical composer. Born in Russia, he emigrated to the United States and began a career in New York City as a newspaper writer and in the entertainment business. In 1931 he moved to Los Angeles, where he lived for the rest of his life and where he wrote the scripts for over thirty movies. These movies included Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1931), The Miracle Man (1932), Phantom of the Opera (1943), The Wizard of Oz (1939), Tales of Manhattan (1942), Flesh and Fantasy (1943), Laura (1944), and Ernst Lubitsch's Cluny Brown (1946). In addition, Hoffenstein, along with Cole Porter and Kenneth Webb, helped compose the musical score for Gay Divorce (1933), the stage musical that became the film The Gay Divorcee (1934). He died in Los Angeles, California. A book of his verse, Pencil in the Air, was published three days after his death to critical acclaim. Another book of his work was published in 1928, titled Poems in Praise of Practically Nothing. The book contained some of his work that had been formerly published in the New York World, the New York Tribune, Vanity Fair, the D. A. C. News, and Snappy Stories. more…

All Samuel Hoffenstein scripts | Samuel Hoffenstein Scripts

FAVORITE (0 fans)

Submitted on August 05, 2018

Translation

Translate and read this script in other languages:

Select another language:

  • - Select -
  • Chinese - Simplified 简体中文 (Chinese - Simplified)
  • Chinese - Traditional 繁體中文 (Chinese - Traditional)
  • Spanish Español (Spanish)
  • Esperanto Esperanto (Esperanto)
  • Japanese 日本語 (Japanese)
  • Portuguese Português (Portuguese)
  • German Deutsch (German)
  • Arabic العربية (Arabic)
  • French Français (French)
  • Russian Русский (Russian)
  • Kannada ಕನ್ನಡ (Kannada)
  • Korean 한국어 (Korean)
  • Hebrew עברית (Hebrew)
  • Ukrainian Український (Ukrainian)
  • Urdu اردو (Urdu)
  • Hungarian Magyar (Hungarian)
  • Hindi मानक हिन्दी (Hindi)
  • Indonesian Indonesia (Indonesian)
  • Italian Italiano (Italian)
  • Tamil தமிழ் (Tamil)
  • Turkish Türkçe (Turkish)
  • Telugu తెలుగు (Telugu)
  • Thai ภาษาไทย (Thai)
  • Vietnamese Tiếng Việt (Vietnamese)
  • Czech Čeština (Czech)
  • Polish Polski (Polish)
  • Indonesian Bahasa Indonesia (Indonesian)
  • Romanian Românește (Romanian)
  • Dutch Nederlands (Dutch)
  • Greek Ελληνικά (Greek)
  • Latin Latinum (Latin)
  • Swedish Svenska (Swedish)
  • Danish Dansk (Danish)
  • Finnish Suomi (Finnish)
  • Persian فارسی (Persian)
  • Yiddish ייִדיש (Yiddish)
  • Armenian հայերեն (Armenian)
  • Norwegian Norsk (Norwegian)
  • English English (English)

Discuss this Love Me Tonight script with the community:

Citation

Use the citation below to add this screenplay to your bibliography:

Style:MLAChicagoAPA

"Love Me Tonight" Scripts.com. STANDS4 LLC, 2019. Web. 23 Oct. 2019. <https://www.scripts.com/script/love_me_tonight_12946>.

We need you!

Help us build the largest writers community and scripts collection on the web!

Watch the movie trailer

Love Me Tonight

The Marketplace:

Sell your Script !

Get listed in the most prominent screenplays collection on the web!


The Studio:

ScreenWriting Tool

Write your screenplay and focus on the story with many helpful features.


Thanks for your vote! We truly appreciate your support.