Love Letters

Synopsis: Allen Quinton writes a fellow soldier's love letters; tragedy results. Later, Allen meets a beautiful amnesiac who fears postmen...
Director(s): William Dieterle
Production: Paramount Pictures
 
IMDB:
7.3
APPROVED
Year:
1945
101 min
45 Views

What's the matter?

Let's stop this thing right now.

Don't tell me you've

fallen in love with her?

Roger, you're such a fool.

Of course, I am.

That's why I asked you

to write my love letters for me.

Lying my head off for you to a girl

I've never even seen.

It's not lying. I do love her.

Only I've never been able to put

fancy feelings into fancy words.

Of course. I've never had

any fancy feelings.

Did you ever have any honest ones?

Who me? What about you?

Why'd you agree to write

for me in the first place?

Because I was able to write to her

all the things I was never able

to say to any woman I know.

I always wanted to say them to someone.

This seemed the best way.

Writing to an unknown girl

who wouldn't care.

But Victoria cared.

Understood.

Well, what's wrong?

Give me her last letter.

Listen to this.

And see if you want to go on.

"Dear Roger,

I loved you long before I met you.

I always wanted to find a man who feel

and think and write the way you do.

The man who would look at life

not as a burden or a punishment.

But as a dream of beauty

which we can make real.

It is terrible waiting for you.

But finding you

was such a great miracle

that anything I suffer seems

only a small payment in return.

Come on, come on. Finish it.

Don't take it so seriously.

Roger, don't you realize what

these letters mean to Victoria?

- What does it mean to you?

- Nothing.

Then why worry?

You ought to feel proud.

You made her fall in love with me.

She's in love with these letters...

that you didn't write.

With my letters.

What is the difference?

She's in love with

a man who doesn't exist.

Oh, well.

I'll make a good substitute.

That's what you've always been!

A substitute. Strictly low-fat.

The food in this place is simply awful.

But the wine! Mmm.

Here. Have some.

Orvisto '27.

Thanks.

It's worth a trip to Italy.

Oh-oh. Dirty work, huh?

Roger up to his usual standards?

I never had any standards.

Hmm.

Hey hey.

Do you have to drink like a pig?

Don't you know the difference between

a rare vintage and a mug of beer?

He doesn't.

I never had any standards,

manners or taste.

- Bragging again?

- I am.

Senor Capitano.

Coming. See you later, fellas.

Thanks for the drink.

- Alan, what about it?

- What about what?

The letter from Victoria.

Come on. Finish it.

Roger, why don't you leave her alone?

Let her forget you.

This is for you.

I like something better occasionally.

Get it yourself.

I'm not gonna write anymore letters.

Come on, Alan.

I promise this'll be the last one.

We finish it for me?

You won't write her anymore letters?

I won't write her any more.

- Word of honor?

- Word of honor.

Tell me, do you write

this kind of stuff to Helen too?

No, I don't write to Helen very often.

- You're engaged to her, aren't you?

- Yes.

Then what's Victoria to you?

Call her...

A pinup girl of the spirit.

The spirit? Wait till you see her.

She's...

I don't wanna see her.

I don't wanna know who she is.

Or what she looks like. Anything.

There.

I never thought I'd sign my soul

with the name of Roger Morley.

Address, please.

The handwriting is your soul too.

To Victoria Remington...

Meadow Farm, Longreach...

Essex, England.

Oh, say. Add a line for me, will you?

What?

Tell her she'll see me

in person in a few days.

What?

Didn't I tell you?

They're sending me

back to England for special training.

No you didn't tell me.

I applied for transfer

to the paratroopers months ago.

I just got accepted.

Come on, write.

You want me to give your love

to Helen while I'm in England?

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Ayn Rand

Ayn Rand (; born Alisa Zinovyevna Rosenbaum; February 2 [O.S. January 20] 1905 – March 6, 1982) was a Russian-American novelist, playwright, screenwriter and philosopher. She is known for her two best-selling novels, The Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged, and for developing a philosophical system she named Objectivism. Educated in Russia, she moved to the United States in 1926. She had a play produced on Broadway in 1935 and 1936. After two early novels that were initially unsuccessful, she achieved fame with her 1943 novel, The Fountainhead. In 1957, Rand published her best-known work, the novel Atlas Shrugged. Afterward, she turned to non-fiction to promote her philosophy, publishing her own periodicals and releasing several collections of essays until her death in 1982. Rand advocated reason as the only means of acquiring knowledge and rejected faith and religion. She supported rational and ethical egoism and rejected altruism. In politics, she condemned the initiation of force as immoral and opposed collectivism and statism as well as anarchism, instead supporting laissez-faire capitalism, which she defined as the system based on recognizing individual rights, including property rights. In art, Rand promoted romantic realism. She was sharply critical of most philosophers and philosophical traditions known to her, except for Aristotle, Thomas Aquinas and classical liberals.Literary critics received Rand's fiction with mixed reviews and academia generally ignored or rejected her philosophy, though academic interest has increased in recent decades. The Objectivist movement attempts to spread her ideas, both to the public and in academic settings. She has been a significant influence among libertarians and American conservatives. more…

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Submitted on August 05, 2018

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"Love Letters" Scripts.com. STANDS4 LLC, 2019. Web. 25 Aug. 2019. <https://www.scripts.com/script/love_letters_12939>.

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