Lady in a Cage

Synopsis: The lady is Mrs. Hilyard, a wealthy poetess who lives in a three-story city mansion and her cage is her elevator, which stops a dozen feet short of the main floor due to an electrical failure on a July 4th weekend. She rings her outside alarm, eventually noticed by a drunken derelict, who breaks into the house, ignores her plight and helps himself to various items and alcohol. He leaves with his loot but returns a while later with a plump prostitute and three teenage hoodlums, who proceed to terrorize Mrs. Hilyard as they wreck her home.
Director(s): Walter Grauman
Production: Paramount Pictures
 
IMDB:
6.9
Rotten Tomatoes:
20%
NOT RATED
Year:
1964
94 min
6 Views

This is the Radio Tabernacle

to ask this question:

Have we an anti-Satan missile?

While we've been conquering

polio and space...

... what have we done about the devil?

Darling?

You downstairs?

I'll be right down.

- Mother!

- Don't shout, love.

I'm right here.

I don't know why I don't

keep this in my room.

I simply adore it.

- Well, you better wash it first.

- Really?

I don't think too much washing

is good for Lowestoft.

In cool water. I'll do it.

- I have to get my breakfast things.

- Oh, I'll get them. You start on down.

- Go on now, darling. Go ahead.

- Did you leave me a note?

- What?

- One of your little love notes.

Like you used to.

Well, yes, but I don't want you

reading it until I've left.

Go ahead. Start down.

Is that new shaving stuff?

- Marvellous scent.

- Guaranteed to make me irresistible.

You better get a move on.

- The radio says traffic's fierce already.

- Okay.

Oh, you go ahead. I don't have

patience for that contraption.

I don't blame you. I'll be glad

when I don't have to use it anymore.

It's really gonna be hot today.

It's warm right now.

American or Russian...

The expected death toll from

highway accidents as well as

swimming and boating mishaps

may well exceed

last year's record high.

They always sound so sort of pleased.

- What?

- Drive very, very carefully, love.

I always do.

"Careful" Malcolm they call me.

"Un-Headstrong" Hilyard.

I do wish you could try to cut down

on your smoking.

I'll try.

Who are your guests going

to be this weekend?

- Peggy and Paul?

- Oh, just the three of us.

I'm cook, Paul's butler

and Peggy gets to be waited on.

We'll miss you.

Perhaps we can go up together

in the fall.

I should be through

with this wretched thing by then.

Although I keep dreaming that maybe

the stock market will go zooming up,

and we can go to Paris.

London and Paris.

All this war talk in the papers,

maybe we should go into

armament stocks again.

It seems such a terrible way to make

money though, don't you think?

You're gonna be all right now?

Nellie's available?

I'll call Nellie if I need her,

you if I need you,

ice company if I need ice,

the coal company if I need coal,

and the happiness people

if I need happiness.

Yes, dear, I'll be fine.

I squeezed some fresh orange juice

for you.

I'll get something to eat on the road.

I read an article about

blood sugar and hot days.

Orange juice is highly recommended.

How about that other article

you read last month,

that it's actually healthier to keep

your blood-sugar level low?

What?

No, I'm kidding, darling.

Though your health hints

do sort of overlap sometimes.

Tease me all you want, but drink it.

That's a good boy.

I'll be back by...

Oh, lunchtime, Tuesday.

Maybe right after lunch.

Such a large suitcase

for one small weekend?

Why not? I don't have to pay

excess baggage to the car.

Oh, Lowestoft, cool and pure

Passion remote and beauty secure

Who wrote that?

Come to think of it,

it's a line of mine.

That's getting old,

forgetting your own work.

- What?

- I was just wondering who wrote

a bit of verse and then

remembered it was I.

Darling, you really had

better get started,

or it'll just be traffic, traffic, traffic.

Goodbye.

- Give my love to Peggy and Paul.

- I will.

Have a good time, love.

Now, what the hell's the matter

with you?

lt'll be all right in a minute.

I suppose all the electricity

in the neighbourhood is off.

I'm sure people are calling up

like mad.

Hello?

Hello?

Hello?

I never felt so idiotic in my life.

Happy weekend!

The movement to the mountains,

Rate this script:(0.00 / 0 votes)

Luther Davis

Luther Davis (August 29, 1916 – July 29, 2008) was an American play- and screenwriter. He attended Culver Academies, received a BA from Yale and rose to the rank of major in the US Air Force. He was the father of two daughters and was married to soap opera actress Jennifer Bassey, his companion since 1978, from 2004 until his death. In collaboration with Charles Lederer, Robert Wright, and George Forrest, Luther Davis wrote Kismet, Timbuktu!, and two different treatments of Vicki Baum’s novel Grand Hotel (At the Grand for the Los Angeles and San Francisco Light Opera Association and the Broadway musical version, Grand Hotel, The Musical). He received two Tony Awards in 1954 (with Lederer) for Kismet as Best Author (Musical) and as co-author of the book contributed to the Best Musical win. He was nominated again in 1978, for Most Innovative Production of a Revival, as producer of Timbuktu!, and in 1990 as author of the Best Book (Musical) for Grand Hotel, The Musical. He wrote fifteen movies, many television specials and co-produced Stephen MacDonald’s Off-Broadway play, Not About Heroes. He won two Mystery Writers of America Edgar Awards and was nominated many times by the Writers Guild of America and the League of American Theatres and Producers. more…

All Luther Davis scripts | Luther Davis Scripts

FAVORITE (0 fans)

Submitted on August 05, 2018

Translation

Translate and read this script in other languages:

Select another language:

  • - Select -
  • Chinese - Simplified 简体中文 (Chinese - Simplified)
  • Chinese - Traditional 繁體中文 (Chinese - Traditional)
  • Spanish Español (Spanish)
  • Esperanto Esperanto (Esperanto)
  • Japanese 日本語 (Japanese)
  • Portuguese Português (Portuguese)
  • German Deutsch (German)
  • Arabic العربية (Arabic)
  • French Français (French)
  • Russian Русский (Russian)
  • Kannada ಕನ್ನಡ (Kannada)
  • Korean 한국어 (Korean)
  • Hebrew עברית (Hebrew)
  • Ukrainian Український (Ukrainian)
  • Urdu اردو (Urdu)
  • Hungarian Magyar (Hungarian)
  • Hindi मानक हिन्दी (Hindi)
  • Indonesian Indonesia (Indonesian)
  • Italian Italiano (Italian)
  • Tamil தமிழ் (Tamil)
  • Turkish Türkçe (Turkish)
  • Telugu తెలుగు (Telugu)
  • Thai ภาษาไทย (Thai)
  • Vietnamese Tiếng Việt (Vietnamese)
  • Czech Čeština (Czech)
  • Polish Polski (Polish)
  • Indonesian Bahasa Indonesia (Indonesian)
  • Romanian Românește (Romanian)
  • Dutch Nederlands (Dutch)
  • Greek Ελληνικά (Greek)
  • Latin Latinum (Latin)
  • Swedish Svenska (Swedish)
  • Danish Dansk (Danish)
  • Finnish Suomi (Finnish)
  • Persian فارسی (Persian)
  • Yiddish ייִדיש (Yiddish)
  • Armenian հայերեն (Armenian)
  • Norwegian Norsk (Norwegian)
  • English English (English)

Discuss this Lady in a Cage script with the community:

Citation

Use the citation below to add this screenplay to your bibliography:

Style:MLAChicagoAPA

"Lady in a Cage" Scripts.com. STANDS4 LLC, 2019. Web. 21 Nov. 2019. <https://www.scripts.com/script/lady_in_a_cage_12151>.

We need you!

Help us build the largest writers community and scripts collection on the web!

The Marketplace:

Sell your Script !

Get listed in the most prominent screenplays collection on the web!


The Studio:

ScreenWriting Tool

Write your screenplay and focus on the story with many helpful features.


Thanks for your vote! We truly appreciate your support.