Lady Be Good

Synopsis: Songwriters Dixie Donegan and Eddie Crane are still in love after their divorce. Dixie's friend Marilyn Marsh tries to convince them to marry again, but this isn't that easy.
 
IMDB:
6.5
NOT RATED
Year:
1941
112 min
132 Views


Do you swear to tell the truth,

nothing but the truth, so help you God?

- I do.

- Sit down, please.

You're a professional songwriter,

I believe, Mrs. Crane.

- I am.

- Your husband also?

- Yes.

- You composed love songs together, eh?

- Mostly.

- Who wrote the words?

- I did.

- I see.

And your husband furnished the music?

Oh, no, his music came first,

I furnished the words.

How long did you know the defendant

before you married him?

About four and a half years.

And you met him professionally

at that time?

Well, um, not exactly, Your Honor.

You see...

Well, he used to come into a little

restaurant on 47th Street where I worked.

I used to serve him breakfast

every day at 12.

He'd eat 50 cents' worth

and I'd only punch 20 on the check.

That's how we became acquainted.

Why did you do that?

I liked him.

Well, don't you think that was

dishonest to your employer?

No. I always put the difference

on somebody else's check.

I take it Mr. Crane wasn't so successful.

- Well, nobody appreciated him then.

- Except you.

- Well, I didn't count.

- But you encouraged him.

- Yes.

- So you feel you discovered him?

No. Eddie discovered me.

- How?

- I went out with him one night...

Proceed, Mrs. Crane.

Well, we became a habit.

I know, but how did you happen

to become a writer of lyrics?

Oh.

Well, I started rewriting

Mother Goose when I was only 6.

Then I wound up writing verses

on greeting cards...

...and the firm went bankrupt.

That's when I went into dealing them

off the arm.

- Off the arm?

- Yes. You know, like:

Oh, I'm sorry.

I mean, that's when I became a waitress.

- Your Honor, may I interrupt?

Yes.

I would like Mrs. Crane to tell us how she

formed this partnership with her husband.

It's relevant at this point.

Just tell us in your own words,

Mrs. Crane.

Well, it all happened

very suddenly one night.

We were sitting in a little gloomy piano

room at Max Milton's publishing house.

Max thought Eddie had talent,

so he let him use the room as a favor.

Well, Eddie was working with a lyric writer

on one of the best tunes he ever wrote.

But it was no dice.

I was just sitting there

listening to that piano.

They'd been going on for hours.

Something's wrong.

Maybe it's me or the tune.

I don't know, but I'm not clicking.

Well, you will. You will.

Take your time, Billy.

Look, Eddie, I'll be frank with you.

It's silly for us to waste our time.

I just don't like the tune.

Oh.

That doesn't mean we can't get together.

That's not the only tune you'll write.

I don't know whether it is or not.

You're taking it too serious, kid.

Pull yourself together. Let's get coffee.

- What do you say?

- Whatever Eddie says.

No, you go ahead.

I'll stick around for a while.

Okay. No hard feelings?

No, certainly not.

And thanks for getting together with me.

Forget it. If you think you got something,

give me a jingle.

- I want a hit as much as you. Good night.

Good night.

- Night, Dixie.

- Night.

I'm sorry,

I didn't mean to take it out on you.

Eddie...

...I know you're disappointed,

and I don't blame you.

Just because Billy

says the tune's no good...

...that doesn't make it so.

Why, it's beautiful.

You don't understand.

It isn't only the song.

It isn't necessarily Billy. It's just that...

Well, in this business

you've gotta have a hookup, a team.

There's no sense in writing a tune

then peddling it like a hot fur coat...

...from one guy to another

hoping to get a fluke hit.

You've gotta work with somebody

until you've built a style...

...and a quality that's recognizable.

Look at George Gershwin. He had Ira.

There's Rodgers and Hart,

Kern and Hammerstein.

Oh, what's the use?

There are a dozen more.

They work together.

One helps the other and they go places.

Yeah. I know what you mean.

- Eddie?

- Mm?

Would you mind

if a girl wrote the words to your tune?

Of course not. There's Dorothy Fields.

She's one of the best in the business.

Well, could you get her?

No. She's tied up.

Would you listen to some I wrote?

- You?

- Oh...

I know it's ridiculous for me to think

that you could think...

...that I could write some words...

...but the melody kept saying the words

over and over while you were playing...

...and before I knew it, I had a song.

- You have?

- Uh-huh. You wanna hear it?

- Let me see the words. I can tell by looking.

You couldn't read them.

I jotted them down on my handkerchief.

I always do.

It's, well, kind of unobtrusive.

Well, go ahead and play, Eddie.

But don't laugh, will you?

- The way I feel?

- Well, not in my face, anyhow.

You'll never know

If an apple is ripe

Till you bite it

You'll never know

If a fire is gonna burn

Till you light it

You'll never know

What it means to be blue

Till you've lost an old friend

You'll never know

Just how long is your road

Till you've reached the end

You'll never know

How good a book may be

Till you've read it

You'll never know

What one kind word can do

Till you've said it

You and I could find romance

But, darling, till you take that chance

You'll never, never

Never ever

Know

Dixie, you've done it.

- I don't know how, but you've done it.

- Have I?

Why, it makes me sick, it's so wonderful.

You let me die on the vine for lyrics,

and you've got them up your sleeve.

I think it'll swing too.

- I'll bet it will. Let's try it.

- Yeah.

You'll never know if an apple is ripe

Till you bite it

You'll never know if a fire is gonna burn

Till you light it

You'll never know

What it means to be blue

Till you've lost an old friend

You'll never know how long is your road

Till you've reached the end

You'll never know

How good a book may be

Till you've read it

You'll never know what a kind word can do

Till you've said it

You and I could find romance

But, darling

Till you take

That chance

Gosh, Dixie.

Gosh, Eddie.

By golly, that deserves a kiss.

Well, I wouldn't be surprised if Crane and

Donegan had a hit on their handkerchief.

And it was a hit too.

We went to work on another one,

which didn't come so easy, incidentally.

But we fought and wrestled it through,

and it was successful.

So then I thought it was safe for me

to quit my job in the restaurant.

Besides...

...Eddie felt that he could afford

to eat in a better place.

I see.

And this successful collaboration

led to your marriage.

Yes, Your Honor.

That, plus a little item called love.

On whose part?

Well, mine, I guess.

Ah. It didn't last?

I didn't say that.

Oh, one of those.

You love him, but...

Your Honor, may I interrupt once more?

Yes.

I would like to call a witness

if the court pleases.

Someone altogether impartial

who could clarify this portion of the case.

Yes. I think it's going to need

a little clarity. Go ahead.

That will be all for the time being,

Mrs. Crane.

Miss Marilyn Marsh, please.

Name, please?

- Marilyn Marsh.

Raise your right hand.

Do you swear to tell the truth,

nothing but the truth, so help you God?

Rate this script:0.0 / 0 votes

Jack McGowan

John "Jack" McGowan (1894–1977) was an American librettist, director and producer. more…

All Jack McGowan scripts | Jack McGowan Scripts

0 fans

Submitted on August 05, 2018

Discuss this script with the community:

0 Comments

    Translation

    Translate and read this script in other languages:

    Select another language:

    • - Select -
    • 简体中文 (Chinese - Simplified)
    • 繁體中文 (Chinese - Traditional)
    • Español (Spanish)
    • Esperanto (Esperanto)
    • 日本語 (Japanese)
    • Português (Portuguese)
    • Deutsch (German)
    • العربية (Arabic)
    • Français (French)
    • Русский (Russian)
    • ಕನ್ನಡ (Kannada)
    • 한국어 (Korean)
    • עברית (Hebrew)
    • Gaeilge (Irish)
    • Українська (Ukrainian)
    • اردو (Urdu)
    • Magyar (Hungarian)
    • मानक हिन्दी (Hindi)
    • Indonesia (Indonesian)
    • Italiano (Italian)
    • தமிழ் (Tamil)
    • Türkçe (Turkish)
    • తెలుగు (Telugu)
    • ภาษาไทย (Thai)
    • Tiếng Việt (Vietnamese)
    • Čeština (Czech)
    • Polski (Polish)
    • Bahasa Indonesia (Indonesian)
    • Românește (Romanian)
    • Nederlands (Dutch)
    • Ελληνικά (Greek)
    • Latinum (Latin)
    • Svenska (Swedish)
    • Dansk (Danish)
    • Suomi (Finnish)
    • فارسی (Persian)
    • ייִדיש (Yiddish)
    • հայերեն (Armenian)
    • Norsk (Norwegian)
    • English (English)

    Citation

    Use the citation below to add this screenplay to your bibliography:

    Style:MLAChicagoAPA

    "Lady Be Good" Scripts.com. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 21 Jul 2024. <https://www.scripts.com/script/lady_be_good_12141>.

    We need you!

    Help us build the largest writers community and scripts collection on the web!

    Browse Scripts.com

    The Studio:

    ScreenWriting Tool

    Write your screenplay and focus on the story with many helpful features.


    Quiz

    Are you a screenwriting master?

    »
    What is the purpose of a "beat sheet" in screenwriting?
    A To describe the setting in detail
    B To write character dialogues
    C To outline major plot points
    D To provide camera directions