Jackie

Synopsis: Jackie is a portrait of one of the most important and tragic moments in American history, seen through the eyes of the iconic First Lady, then Jacqueline Kennedy. Jackie places us in her world during the days immediately following her husband's assassination. Known for her extraordinary dignity and poise, here we see a portrait of the First Lady as she fights to establish her husband's legacy and the world of "Camelot" that she created and loved so well.
Director(s): Pablo Larraín
Production: Fox Searchlight Pictures
  Nominated for 3 Oscars. Another 42 wins & 158 nominations.
 
IMDB:
6.7
Metacritic:
81
Rotten Tomatoes:
88%
R
Year:
2016
100 min
$13,958,679
2,791 Views


FADE IN:

EXT. HYANNIS BEACH -DAY

JACKIE KENNEDY. Jet-black bouffant, regal bearing, perfectsymmetrical features.

But the light behind her eyes has gone out.

She walks alone, shuddering against a frigid wind.

FADE TO BLACK.

SUPER:
Hyannis Port, Massachusetts 1963

FADE IN:

INT. KENNEDY COMPOUND -LIVING ROOM

Jackie --black trim slacks, beige pullover sweater --pacesat the window.

Finally, a cab pulls into the driveway.

INT. KENNEDY COMPOUND -FOYER

A JOURNALIST --handsome yet rumpled --stands uneasily inthe doorway.

JOURNALIST:

Mrs. Kennedy? They told me to come

up.

She studies his unkempt appearance, but doesn't answer. TheJournalist is perplexed but strains to be gentle...

JOURNALIST (CONT'D)

I-I'm so sorry for your loss.

Jackie takes a long moment --her voice raw...

JACKIE:

Have you read what they've beenwriting? Krock and Merriman and

all the rest?

JOURNALIST:

Yes. I have.

2.

JACKIE:

Merriman is such a bitter man.

It's been just one week and alreadythey’re treating him like somedusty old artifact, to be shelved

away.

(beat)

That’s no way to be remembered.

JOURNALIST:

And how would you like him

remembered, Mrs. Kennedy?

Suddenly stern, authoritative -

JACKIE:

You understand that I will be

editing this conversation?

(beat)

Just in case I don’t say exactlywhat I mean.

JOURNALIST:

With all due respect that seemsvery unlikely, Mrs. Kennedy.

Jackie stares at him, polite but firm.

JOURNALIST (CONT’D)

Right. Okay. So this will be yourown version of...what happened.

Holding his gaze, she refocuses, preparing for a performanceof sorts.

JACKIE:

Exactly. Come in.

EXT. KENNEDY COMPOUND -DECK

Jackie and the Journalist sit across from each other at a

table. She smokes a cigarette, lost in the horrible memory.

JACKIE:

I thought it was another backfire.

(beat)

I very nearly didn’t go. What if

I’d been here, or out riding inVirginia somewhere?

(beat)

Thank God I was with him...

She trails off.

3.

JOURNALIST:

Why, thank God?

Instead of an answer-

JACKIE:

Do you know what I think ofhistory?

JOURNALIST:

Of history?

JACKIE:

I've read a great deal. More than

people realize. The more I read,

the more I wonder: When somethingis written down, does that make it

true?

JOURNALIST:

It's all that we have.

JACKIE:

Had. We have television now. Now

people can see with their own eyes.

JOURNALIST:

That tour of the White House youdid a couple of years ago, for CBS,

I always assumed you did thatfor...a purpose? No? After the

fashion magazines? You even won anEmmy...

JACKIE:

I didn’t do that program for me.I

did it for the American people.

JOURNALIST:

That program was my first glimpseinto the White House and for

whatever it’s worth, I thought youwere excellent, very poised.

JACKIE:

Thank you.

An afterthought...

JOURNALIST:

You could have had a career as a

broadcaster. I’m sure.

4.

JACKIE:

What?

The Journalist looks up from his notes.

JOURNALIST:

I’m sorry?

JACKIE:

What did you say?

JOURNALIST:

(nervous)

I said...you could have had acareer as a broadcaster.

JACKIE:

Are you giving me professionaladvice?

He shakes his head, embarrassed...

JOURNALIST:

I’m not.

(beat)

But I’m sure that the whole countrywould like to know what you’regoing to do next.

JACKIE:

I can assure you --not television.

She takes another drag of her cigarette.

CUT TO:

INT. HALLWAY -WHITE HOUSE (1962)

Jackie is a year younger --at the height of her legendarybeauty --wearing a floor-length, scarlet gown.

JACKIE:

Welcome to the White House.

Behind her are LIGHTS and BOOM MIC’s --a full-blown

TELEVISION PRODUCTION.

She stands face to face with NANCY TUCKERMAN, her social

secretary. Life-long friends, Nancy is Jackie's lessstylish, less successful sister.

Displeased with the sound of her voice, Jackie lifts hershoulders, her posture more erect. She tries again.

5.

JACKIE (CONT’D)

Welcome to the White House. We’re

so proud to call it home.

Her brow furrows, still dissatisfied.

NANCY:

Why don’t you try ‘the people’shouse’? Make it more personal.

Jackie considers the suggestion. And now --with thatnotorious, breathy diction...

JACKIE:

Welcome to the people's house.

We're so proud to call it home.

(beat)

Better?

Nancy nods.

JACKIE (CONT’D)

When will Jack join us?

NANCY:

They want to hear from you.

Jackie is skeptical -

JACKIE:

They think I’m a fool --one yearin office, wasting their money.

NANCY:

That’s why you need to show themwhat you’ve done.

Nancy can tell Jackie is still uneasy.

NANCY (CONT’D)

The President will join you in theMonroe Room. At the end of the

tour. You'll be great.

Jackie smiles, grateful and takes a deep breath.

JACKIE:

Stay close.

NANCY:

Of course. You look beautiful.

Jackie walks onto set and the TV LIGHTS turn ON.

6.

INT. STAGING ROOM -WHITE HOUSE (1962)-CONTINUOUS

**This is the legendary White House tour, broadcast by CBS onFebruary 14, 1962, to an audience of 56 million people**

CHARLES COLLINGSWOOD of CBS NEWS narrates over black and

white footage.

COLLINGSWOOD (V.O.)

This is the White House as seen

from its South Lawn. For the next

hour Mrs. John F. Kennedy invitesyou to visit the President’s Houseand see some of the restorations

she’s made in its interior. Mrs.

John F. Kennedy, third youngest ofthe twenty-nine wives to live inthe White House.

Jackie's beauty has been magnified ten-fold. Her nerves have

vanished. She smiles, radiant, and the show is on...

COLLINGSWOOD:

Mrs. Kennedy I want to thank youfor letting us visit your officialhome.

(beat)

This is obviously the room fromwhich most of your work on it isdirected...

All around them, ANTIQUE FURNITURE is arranged in variousstates of restoration and disrepair.

JACKIE:

(playful)

Yes, it's attic and the cellar all

in one. Since our work started we

received hundreds of letters everyday. This is where we evaluate allof the finds and see if we want to

keep them if they’ll fit into ourbudget.

COLLINGSWOOD:

Mrs. Kennedy, every first lady andevery administration sincePresident Madison's time, has made

changes greater or smaller in theWhite House.

Jackie steals a glance off-camera. With a quiet gesture -Nancy

reminds her to smile.

7.

COLLINGSWOOD (CONT’D)

Before we look at some of the

changes you've made...What's your

basic plan?

A beat, as Jackie considers her motivation. And then, from

the heart -

JACKIE:

Well, I really don't have one.

Because I think this house will

always grow and should. It just

seemed to me such a shame when we

came here, to find hardly anything

of the past in the house. Hardly

anything before 19-2.

Off-camera Nancy looks at her notes, nodding along toJackie’s words.

COLLINGSWOOD:

Now suppose you and your committee

were to acquire some of the things

that are in this room, what happens

when the next President’s wife

comes into the White House?

JACKIE:

Well if they don’t want it...in the

past, you see, they could sell it

Rate this script:3.3 / 3 votes

Noah Oppenheim

Noah Oppenheim (born, 1978) is a writer, Emmy-winning television producer, and President of NBC News.[1][2] Previously, Oppenheim was the executive in charge of NBC's Today Show, head of development at Reveille, and senior producer of NBC's Today Show, where he supervised the 7–8am hour of the broadcast. more…

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