Interstellar script
Interstellar (2014)
Synopsis: In Earth's future, a global crop blight and second Dust Bowl are slowly rendering the planet uninhabitable. Professor Brand (Michael Caine), a brilliant NASA physicist, is working on plans to save mankind by transporting Earth's population to a new home via a wormhole. But first, Brand must send former NASA pilot Cooper (Matthew McConaughey) and a team of researchers through the wormhole and across the galaxy to find out which of three planets could be mankind's new home.

SPACE.

But not the dark lonely corner of it we're used to. This is

a glittering inferno -- the center of a distant galaxy.

Suddenly, something TEARS past at incredible speed: a NEUTRON

STAR. It SMASHES headlong through everything it encounters...

planets, stars. Can anything stop this juggernaut?

Yes. Something looms at the heart of the galaxy, hidden

inside the blinding starlight, a dark flaw in the fabric of

existence itself: a BLACK HOLE.

The neutron star is pulled into the black hole's swirl,

spiraling closer and closer to destruction. Finally, it

contacts the hole's edge and EXPLODES.

The EXPLOSION is so powerful that it sends shock waves into

the fabric of space-time itself. We ride one of these waves,

racing back out from the black hole.

Suddenly, a portion of the wave disappears down a crystal-

like hole, emerging in a much darker region of the universe --

a backwater that, as the wave races past a giant red planet

with a distinctive eye, we recognize as our own.

The wave, now just an infinitesimal ripple, finally reaches

our blue planet. It drops into our atmosphere over North

America, toward the high desert east of the Cascades, and

through the roof of a nondescript warehouse.

The wave tickles the atoms in the steel shell of a vacuum

chamber, then dances a tiny jig with a laser beam reflected

in a heavy piece of glass.

The wave shoots back out of the building and disappears in

the fractal branches of a tumbleweed resting against a

concrete tube that stretches for miles in the desert.

An SUV speeds past the tumbleweed and we follow it till it

parks at another plain-looking building at the opposite end

of the tube. A MAN climbs out of the SUV.

INT. CONTROL ROOM, WAREHOUSE -- DAY

The man lets himself into a large room that looks like Mission

Control. He pours himself a cup of coffee. It is the weekend

and the place is empty. No one has been there to see the

displays flashing a distinctive shape -- a pulse followed by

a series of echoes.

The man looks up at the screen, then DROPS his cup of coffee.

CUT TO:

2.

INT. LIGO OFFICES, CALTECH, PASADENA -- DAY

The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory

headquarters at Caltech is a frenzy of activity. POSTDOCS

and RESEARCHERS huddle around monitors and printouts, arguing.

ANSEN, 60s, the director of LIGO, walks through the frenzy.

A postdoc hands him a printout: a pulse followed by echoes.

INT. LIGO DIRECTOR'S OFFICE, CALTECH -- DAY

Ansen steps into the relative calm of a large, sunlit office,

which overlooks a grassy stretch of Caltech's campus.

His ASSISTANT, 30s, is on the phone, on hold. He looks up

at Ansen as he enters.

ASSISTANT:

I'm on hold with the INS.

(COVERS MICROPHONE)

Don't you think we should double

check the triangulation before we

CALL ANYBODY-

ANSEN:

We have double checked it.

Someone finally picks up the line.

ASSISTANT:

Yes. I'm trying to reach-

(pause, listens)

No, I don't think you understand how

serious this is.

(PAUSE)

Because if you did, we'd be having

this conversation in person.

He listens for a moment, then hangs up the phone, confused.

ANSEN:

What did they say?

ASSISTANT:

They said we should look out the

window.

Ansen steps to the window and looks out:

In the courtyard below, coeds are scrambling to get out of

the way as a military helicopter sets down in the middle of

the quad and dozens of ARMED FEDERAL AGENTS converge on his

building.

3.

INT. MAIN CONFERENCE ROOM, LIGO, CALTECH -- DAY

Ansen sits, alone, on one side of a conference table.

The other side is filled with GOVERNMENT MEN -- NSA mostly,

some DIA. The door opens and his assistant steps in. Armed

guards pat him down, then shove him into a seat.

ANSEN:

Is that really necessary?

One of the NSA agents leans forward.

NSA AGENT:

You've been complaining for years

that the government doesn't take

your project seriously enough, Doctor.

(SMILES)

You can't have it both ways.

Ansen motions to his assistant, who turns on a projector.

On-screen, we see the familiar pulse and echoes.

ANSEN:

Yesterday morning, our facility in

Hanford identified this signal: a

neutron star colliding with a

supermassive black hole. We went

through the last year's data and

triangulated the source.

The pulse is translated into a crude animatic of a neutron

star circling into the black hole.

NSA AGENT:

We know that, Doctor. What we don't

know is why, according to your

numbers, this event took place right

here in our own solar system.

Suddenly, the image overlays the sun, the earth, and the

rest of our solar system around the black hole.

ANSEN:

It didn't. Because if it had we'd

all be dead by now.

On-screen, Jupiter, then the Earth and the inner planets are

consumed by the black hole. Only the sun survives, pulled

into orbit around its new master.

ANSEN (CONT'D)

Which leaves only one explanation:

The signal traveled through a

(MORE)

4.

ANSEN (CONT'D)

wormhole. A gateway to a distant

corner of the universe. The black

hole is on the far side.

On-screen, the black hole system is removed to a distant

corner, connected to ours by a tunnel through space-time. A

gravity wave from the collision travels through the tunnel.

NSA AGENT:

I've read your book, Doctor. You

said that wormholes are impossible.

ANSEN:

There is nothing quite as satisfying

as being proved utterly wrong.

(SMILES)

I said that a wormhole couldn't exist

naturally. Not for more than a few

billionths of a second. It would

have to be... stabilized.

NSA AGENT:

Stabilized by what?

Ansen pauses, unsure. His assistant steps in to his defense.

ASSISTANT:

We don't have any way to answer that

question.

NSA AGENT:

(IGNORES HIM)

You're not under peer review here,

Doctor. I don't care about your

reputation. I need to know how that

thing got there. Now.

Ansen finally speaks up.

ANSEN:

If you're worried about an invasion,

I would start drafting the articles

of surrender.

(SMILES)

Whoever they are, if they can build

a wormhole, they could erase us in

the blink of an eye. Luckily, that

also means we have nothing they could

be interested in.

NSA AGENT:

Then why is it there?

5.

ANSEN:

I don't know. Maybe it's an

invitation. A chance to commune

with an advanced species.

The assistant, embarrassed, looks down. The agent notices.

NSA AGENT:

You don't agree?

ASSISTANT:

(DELICATE)

No. I don't think we can assume an

alien intelligence built the wormhole.

(CHANGES TACK)

But the opportunity it represents is

incredible. We could explore parts

of the universe we never dreamt of

reaching in our lifetimes.

The agent exchanges a look with one of his colleagues, who

steps out of the room.

ANSEN:

We need to get back to work. I have

a conference call with our European

partners in fifteen minutes.

NSA AGENT:

We severed the connections to your

European partners this morning.

ANSEN:

(INDIGNANT)

You can't do that. The Europeans

put up some of the funding...

GOVERNMENT MAN:

We'll send them a check.

(STANDS)

Your project is now classified under

the State Secrets Act.

He steps out the door, leaving the men alone. The assistant,

outraged, turns back to his boss.

ASSISTANT:

They can't keep this a secret. You

know that. Sooner or later...

The younger man looks down, embarrassed, as he notices that

tears are rolling down the older man's cheeks.

6.

ANSEN:

I don't care about that. I've spent

my whole life being afraid we would

wipe ourselves out before this moment

arrived. We've made so many mistakes,

I wasn't sure we'd make it...

The assitant realizes that the old man is weeping for joy.

Relief.

ANSEN (CONT'D)

But this will change everything.

Fifty years from now, nothing will

be the same.

The older man looks at the simulation on the screen of the

tiny link between our galaxy and another.

FADE TO BLACK:

EXT. CORNFIELD, CENTRAL CALIFORNIA -- DAY

Corn. As far as the eye can see.

SUPER TITLE:
"FIFTY YEARS LATER"

A large old diesel tour bus is parked by the side of a dirt

road, smoke pouring out of its open hood. A dozen MEN in

BASEBALL UNIFORMS are standing around the front of the bus.

A battered PICKUP pulls up, and a MAN, 30s, gets out, leaving

his two SONS in the car. This is COOPER. He joins the

ballplayers staring at the lifeless diesel engine.

BALLPLAYER:

Seized up on us.

COOPER:

Long way to come by bus. I thought

you guys would have a plane.

BALLPLAYER:

We did. Ran out of parts for it.

You know anything about diesels?

COOPER:

A little.

Cooper steps to the engine compartment.

The ballplayer notices Cooper's two boys, TOM, 15, and MURPH,

10, watching them. He wanders over.

7.

BALLPLAYER:

You think your dad's going to be

able to help us out?

Murph, a filth-encrusted kid with a black eye, smiles at the

ballplayer.

MURPH:

My dad can fix anything.

(WRY SMILE)

Except maybe your fastball.

The ballplayer frowns: smartass kid.

After a moment under the hood, Cooper signals to the driver,

who tries the engine. It turns over once, then STARTS.

BALLPLAYER:

Sure appreciate the help.

COOPER:

(SHRUGS)

You don't make it, my boys won't get

to see you lose.

The ballplayers load up into the bus and as it pulls away,

we can see the logo painted across the back of the bus for

the first time:

WORLD FAMOUS NEW YORK YANKEES

EXT. SPACE, NEAR EARTH ORBIT

Earth spins, lazily. From this height, it looks much the

same as it has done for thousands of years.

Suddenly, a tiny black object appears, racing toward Earth.

The object SMASHES into a large satellite and races onward.

Behind it, the satellite spins out of orbit in a cloud of

fragments.

EXT. BASEBALL STADIUM -- NIGHT

An old minor league stadium. The stands are barely halfway

full. Cooper, his boys, and Cooper's father-in-law, DONALD,

60s, have a row to themselves behind the dugout.

Murph offers his grandpa some popcorn.

DONALD:

Popcorn at a ball game is unnatural.

I want a hot dog.

8.

MURPH:

(CONFUSED)

What's a hot dog?

Suddenly, play stops on the field below as the players and

fans look up at the night sky:

A bright blue streak is tearing across it. It's beautiful.

TOM:

Is that a comet, Dad?

COOPER:

(shakes his head)

Satellite. Big one. Probably

Chinese.

Everyone watches the fireworks as the satellite burns up in

the upper atmosphere.

After a moment, play resumes -- it's a pretty show, but

everyone has seen it plenty of times before.

Down on the field, the Dodgers' catcher misses an easy pop

fly and the Yankees load the bases. Donald looks disgusted.

INT. COOPER'S TRUCK -- NIGHT

Cooper guides his truck along a potholed road. His father-

in-law is riding shotgun; the boys are sleeping in the back.

DONALD:

Those clowns would get their asses

handed to them by the ballplayers I

grew up watching.

COOPER:

You ruin it for the boys when you

talk like that.

DONALD:

I'm not doing my grandkids any favors

by lying to them. They're growing

up watching lousy baseball.

COOPER:

They didn't have any baseball at all

when I was a kid.

That shuts the old man up for now. They drive on in silence.

CUT TO:

9.

EXT. FARMHOUSE -- MORNING

The sun is gently landing on the horizon, painting the sea

of corn around Cooper's modest house gold. Cooper walks out

of his house, still eating his breakfast.

Donald is on the porch, looking at a black clouds of smoke

in the distance. The neighboring fields are BURNING.

DONALD:

Nelson's burning up his crops. Found

some of the blight on the okra.

Cooper watches the men walking through the fields, setting

fire to the crop.

COOPER:

I thought okra wasn't susceptible.

DONALD:

(SHRUGS)

Better safe than sorry.

(looks at him)

You've got to take the boys to school.

COOPER:

Something wrong with your truck?

DONALD:

(SMILES)

Parent-teacher conference day.

Cooper bends his head in dismay.

DONALD (CONT'D)

Be nice to Murph's teacher. She's

single, you know.

COOPER:

What does that have to do with

anything?

DONALD:

We're supposed to be repopulating

the earth. Gotta pull your weight.

Besides, the boys could do with a

woman in their lives.

The boys run out of the house and pile into the truck. Cooper

pulls away before Donald can continue.

EXT. ROAD -- DAY

Cooper weaves the car along a dirt road. The kids are arguing

over an ancient comic book in the back seat.

10.

Cooper turns around to break it up.

BANG -- one of the tires blows out in a foot-deep pothole.

EXT. ROADSIDE -- DAY

Cooper examines the flattened tire. Looks at his older son.

COOPER:

Get the spare, Tom.

TOM:

That is the spare.

COOPER:

All right. We'll use the patch kit.

He moves to the back of the truck. Murph suddenly looks

very glum.

MURPH:

I... I think the patch kit might not

be there...

(off his look)

Because I was using it for my bike.

Cooper looks down at the dirt. Sighs.

COOPER:

Murph's law.

MURPH:

(CONFUSED)

What's that?

Tom snorts with laughter. Turns to his dad.

TOM:

The kid doesn't even know what he

was named after...

Cooper shoots Tom a look -- enough.

TOM (CONT'D)

Murph's law means what can go wrong

will go wrong.

Murph, looking hurt, walks off. Cooper turns to his son.

COOPER:

Find something to patch it with.

TOM:

How am I supposed to do that?

11.

COOPER:

Figure it out. I'm not always going

to be here to help you.

Cooper leaves Tom to catch up with his younger son, who is

looking out over the river.

MURPH:

Is that really why I'm named Murph,

dad?

COOPER:

Listen to me. Murph's law doesn't

mean that. It means what can happen

will happen. All kinds of things.

Good or bad. And that's the way you

want it to be.

MURPH:

Why?

COOPER:

Because if nothing ever happened to

you then you wouldn't learn anything.

Murph is staring off into the distance. He's heard something.

COOPER (CONT'D)

Murph?

Then Cooper hears it, too. A LOW RUMBLING SOUND. Cooper

looks out over the river. Then he turns back and tackles

his son to the ground.

Suddenly, a MASSIVE AIRPLANE SOARS overhead, so close they

can almost touch it. It bounces the truck on its suspension,

then soars off over the fields behind them.

Cooper grabs Murph and races back to the truck. He pulls a

laptop and an antenna made out of a Pringles can out of the

back of the truck. He hands the laptop and antenna to Murph.

COOPER (CONT'D)

Get in.

Tom is still standing by the side of the road, wrestling

with the jack.

TOM:

What about the tire?

INT. TRUCK -- MOMENTS LATER

The truck is SMASHING through the cornfields as fast as Cooper

can push it on three good tires.

12.

Murph is hurriedly firing up the laptop and connecting it to

the directional antenna.

Cooper is straining to see through the cornstalks, scanning

the horizon.

TOM:

OVER THERE-

To the right, the dark shape of the Russian drone appears,

flying low over the fields. Cooper jerks the wheel--

EXT. RIVER -- DAY

The truck BURSTS out of the corn and SPLASHES across the

river and into an old, abandoned suburban housing development

in the valley below, planted over with corn.

Half a mile in front of them, the Russian drone is still

hugging the ground. It has impossibly long, skinny wings,

like an old U-2 surveillance plane, but no cockpit. The

tops of its wings are covered in black solar cells.

INT. TRUCK -- DAY

Murph is fiddling with the computer. His older brother takes

the computer from him and fires up emulation software.

COOPER:

It's a Chinese military drone. Solar

cells could power an entire farm.

(TO TOM)

Take the wheel.

Cooper hands Murph the Pringles can antenna.

COOPER (CONT'D)

Keep it pointed right at it, OK?

Murph nods. Tom takes the wheel as his dad works the laptop,

trying to communicate with the huge Russian drone. The screen

fills with Cyrillic characters.

COOPER (CONT'D)

Faster, Tom. I'm losing it.

Tom WEAVES the truck at speed through the old, curved streets

of the development, past oversized suburban mansions planted

over with corn.

They round a corner and come face-to-face with a robot

harvester. Tom jerks the wheel to avoid it.

BANG -- the truck loses a wing mirror against the flank of

the combine.

13.

EXT. SUBURBAN DEVELOPMENT -- DAY

Tom guides the truck from street to street, trying to chart

a straight path across the fields. The truck BOUNCES as it

SMASHES through an old picket fence.

Ahead, the drone is soaring, banking, pulling away.

INT. TRUCK -- DAY

Cooper is still trying to hack into the drone's control

circuitry as they leave the development behind and begin to

climb into the foothills of the Sierras.

EXT. RIDGELINE, HILLS -- DAY

Tom guides the truck along the spine of the hills. The drone

soars overhead, making for the white tips of the Sierras.

INT. TRUCK -- DAY

Cooper is oblivious to the picturesque surroundings as he

concentrates on the laptop.

TOM:

(UNSURE)

Dad?

COOPER:

Almost got it. Don't slow down.

In front of them, Tom and his brother watch as the drone

plummets from view.

TOM:

DAD.

Cooper looks up. Ahead, the trail disappears as the edge of

the hills falls away -- it's a three hundred-foot drop.

Tom locks up the brakes.

EXT. RIDGELINE, HILLS -- DAY

The truck skids to a halt inches from a precipitous drop.

Cooper climbs out, holding the laptop. Murph climbs out

next to him, still pointing the Pringles can.

TOM:

We lost it.

COOPER:

(SMILING)

No we didn't.

14.

Suddenly, the drone SOARS back over them. Cooper types a

couple keys and then moves his fingers across the trackpad.

The huge drone banks and turns in response.

As the boys watch, Cooper sends the drone soaring high over

them, banking and soaring along the tree-lined sides of the

valley, light glinting from the black panels on its back.

It's a beautiful sight.

Cooper crouches next to Murph.

COOPER (CONT'D)

You want to give it a whirl?

Murph looks at his dad, wide-eyed. He takes the laptop and

moves his fingers gingerly across the pad.

In response, the massive plane banks into a tight turn in

the valley below.

For a moment, Murph is in pure heaven, sending the drone

dancing through the valley below.

COOPER (CONT'D)

Set her down in the valley -- there,

next to the river.

Murph leads the plane in a figure eight and then begins

guiding it into a gentle landing in the valley floor below.

EXT. ABANDONED GOLF COURSE, VALLEY FLOOR -- DAY

The truck limps along the overgrown fairway of a long-defunct

golf course towards the massive hulk of the Russian drone,

Cooper and the boys climb down. The valley is silent save

for the truck's engine WHEEZING and SPUTTERING as it cools.

Cooper runs a hand over the smooth carbon flank of the drone.

TOM:

How long do you think it's been up

there, Dad?

COOPER:

Chinese mission control went down

same as us, twenty years ago. It's

been up there ever since.

TOM:

What was it doing flying so low?

Cooper reads the information pouring into his laptop.

15.

COOPER:

It was looking for something.

Intercepted some kind of signal.

(SHRUGS)

It's been at eighty thousand feet.

Sun probably cooked its brain.

Cooper runs his hand along the flank till he finds an access

patch. He pulls out a crowbar and pries open the hatch.

Inside, surrounded by a nest of liquid cooling tubes, is a

small black module -- the drone's auto-pilot.

Cooper looks down at Murph, who is standing at his elbow.

MURPH:

What are you going to do with it?

COOPER:

Reprogram it. Give it something

socially responsible to do like drive

a combine or a tractor.

MURPH:

(QUIET)

Couldn't we just let it go? It's

not hurting anyone.

Cooper looks down at his son. Good kid.

COOPER:

We need all the help we can get,

Murph. This thing has to adapt,

just like the rest of us.

Cooper gently pries the control module out.

EXT. COUNTY SCHOOL -- DAY

It's a small school, so all the kids and parents waiting in

front know exactly who's driving the pickup truck with half

of a Russian spy plane hanging out of the bed as it pulls up.

INT. PRINCIPAL'S OFFICE, COUNTY SCHOOL -- DAY

Cooper is ushered into the office. The PRINCIPAL, 40s, an

efficient-looking man, shakes his hand.

PRINCIPAL:

Good to see you, Mr. Cooper. This

is Ms. Kelly, Murph's teacher.

Cooper smiles at Ms. KELLY, 30s, attractive.

16.

PRINCIPAL (CONT'D)

So we've gotten Tom's score back.

Congratulations. He's going to make

an excellent farmer.

The principal slides a carbon copy across the desk to Cooper,

who looks taken aback.

COOPER:

What about college?

PRINCIPAL:

The University of California only

accepts a few hundred students a

year, Mr. Cooper. You have to be

realistic.

COOPER:

You're ruling out college for him

now? He's only fifteen.

PRINCIPAL:

I'm sorry. I'm afraid Tom's score

simply isn't high enough.

COOPER:

What are you, about a 36-inch waist?

(BEAT)

30-inch inseam?

PRINCIPAL:

I'm not sure I see--

COOPER:

You're telling me you need two numbers

to measure your own ass, but just

one to measure my son's future?

Ms. Kelly stifles a laugh, then, with a look from the

principal, takes on the appropriate look of offense.

PRINCIPAL:

I understand you're a well-educated

man, Mr. Cooper. A scientist?

COOPER:

Engineer.

PRINCIPAL:

Frankly, the world doesn't need any

more engineers. We didn't run out

of trains or television sets or

satellites.

(BEAT)

We ran out of food.

17.

Cooper leans back. He's not going to win this one.

PRINCIPAL (CONT'D)

The world needs farmers, Mr. Cooper.

And I'm sure your son Tom is going

to make a fine one.

(SMILES BENIGNLY)

We're a caretaker generation. But

things are getting better. Maybe

your grandchildren will be able to

attend college.

Cooper looks down, swallowing his anger.

COOPER:

Are we done?

PRINCIPAL:

One more thing. Ms. Kelly here says

that Murph brought a book to school

about the lunar landings.

He slides an old textbook with a picture of a rocket on the

cover across the desk to Cooper.

COOPER:

One of my old textbooks. Murph liked

the pictures.

MS. KELLY

This is one of the old federal

textbooks. We've replaced them with

corrected versions.

COOPER:

Corrected?

MS. KELLY

The new textbooks explain that the

Apollo lunar missions were faked in

order to bankrupt the Soviet Union.

COOPER:

You don't believe we went to the

moon?

MS. KELLY

I believe it was a brilliant piece

of propaganda. The Soviets spent

years trying to build rockets and

other useless machines.

COOPER:

"Useless machines"?

18.

Cooper looks to the Principal for help. None is forthcoming.

MS. KELLY

Yes, Mr. Cooper. The kind of

wastefulness and excess that the

20th century represented. Your

children would be better off learning

about this planet, rather than reading

fantasies about leaving it.

Cooper is silent for a long moment.

COOPER:

One of those useless machines they

used to make was called an MRI. If

we had any of them left the doctors

might have been able to find the

cyst in my wife's brain before she

died, rather than afterwards. And

then my kids could have been raised

by two parents, instead of me and

their pain-in-the-ass grandfather.

Ms. Kelly's face falls, ashen. Cooper swallows his anger.

Most of it, anyway.

COOPER (CONT'D)

You ever consider the best thing for

the world and humanity might have

been for us to part company?

Cooper gets up to leave.

INT. TRUCK, COUNTY SCHOOL PARKING LOT -- DAY

Cooper climbs into the truck, trying to hold it together.

He PUNCHES the wheel.

The radio KEYS to life. He ignores it. Sits for a moment

in misery. Finally he picks up the handset.

CB OPERATOR (O.S.)

Got a call from Riggs, down in

Galveston. Says some of the tractors

you built him went haywire last night.

COOPER:

Just tell him to power down the

controllers for a couple minutes.

CB OPERATOR (O.S.)

I did. He wants you to come down in

person anyway. Says he found

something you should take a look at.

19.

Cooper stares at the wheel. Shakes his head in frustration.

EXT. AIRSTRIP -- DAY

Cooper pulls his truck up to a grimy-looking hangar. Pulls

a tarp off of an ancient Piper Cub. Checks it over.

INT. PIPER CUB -- DAY

Cooper guides the plane along a long sliver of deserted beach.

The radio crackles to life.

COOPER:

Bravo-two-eight, requesting permission

to enter your airspace.

AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL (O.S.)

Permission granted. Welcome to the

sovereign nation of Texas.

Coop hangs up the radio. Banks the plane inland.

EXT. GULF COAST -- DAY

Below, a combine harvester fights its way up the dunes, trying

to reach the beach, its wheels struggling for traction in

the soft sand.

A MAN waves up at Cooper's plane as it circles overhead.

Cooper lands the plane on a deserted roadway. Jumps down.

He intercepts one of the combines as it trundles past, trying

to reach the dunes. He pops open the cabin.

Inside is a mess of wires hooked into an auto-pilot not unlike

the one he ripped out of the drone. He checks the fault

code and resets the computer.

The man jogs over to meet him.

RIGGS:

Thanks for coming down. Half of 'em

took off last night, looking for

something.

(points to dunes)

Looks like they found it, too. I

thought you were the man to see it.

Riggs starts walking up the dune. Cooper follows.

Below, on the beach, a dozen more combines and other farming

vehicles are lined up at the tideline, warm gulf water lapping

at their metal flanks. They are circling a deep crater.

20.

As they watch, an ancient autonomous SUB BEACHES itself,

trying to reach the crater.

EXT. CRATER'S EDGE, BEACH -- DAY

Cooper steps between the waiting machines and peers down

into the crater.

At the very bottom is a ROUND BLACK BALL, about a foot across --

the same object we saw punch a hole in the side of a

satellite. Every few seconds, it emits a distinctive CHIRP.

Cooper checks his rad meter. A tiny reading -- non-lethal.

He takes off his watch and hands it to Riggs. Then he slides

down into the hole.

The probe CHIRPS as Cooper slides down on top of it. He

rubs a hand across its smooth composite bulk.

RIGGS:

(FROM ABOVE)

You think it's an alien?

Cooper wipes sand off of the object, revealing the faint,

familiar outline etched into the side of the probe:

The stars and stripes of the old federal government.

COOPER:

Not exactly.

EXT. CRATER'S EDGE, BEACH -- DAY

Using a rope and a winch, Cooper hauls the blackened probe

out of the crater and onto the beach.

Cooper hefts it up and carries it to the back of his plane.

COOPER:

Space probe. Never seen one like

it, though. Looks like it's been to

hell and back.

The probe CHIRPS as Cooper belts it into the back.

RIGGS:

How do you think it wound up here?

COOPER:

Lost, I guess. Guidance satellites

would have been shot down by the

Chinese twenty years ago.

Cooper looks at the probe for a second, admiring its form.

21.

INT. KITCHEN, COOPER'S HOUSE -- NIGHT

Donald is pouring a bottle of corn beer into a bubbling vat

of chowder. He turns to watch Cooper work, amused.

The probe has been clamped to the kitchen table. Cooper

works at the blackened case with a BLOWTORCH. Cooper gives

up -- the torch hasn't made a scratch. The probe CHIRPS.

COOPER:

Well I don't know what the hell it's

made of, but I can't crack it open.

DONALD:

Good. Clear it off the table so I

can serve dinner.

Tom and Murph walk in. Murph's got another black eye.

DONALD (CONT'D)

What happened this time?

MURPH:

I got suspended. Paul said anyone

who believed we went to the moon was

an idiot. So I hit him.

COOPER:

Good boy. Hand me the scanner.

Murph hands his dad a defibrillator he's modified for the

purpose. He attaches the shock pads to the sides of the

probe and turns on the power.

Numbers flash across the screen. Cooper hits a button on

the controls and it PULSES.

COOPER (CONT'D)

Here we go. Standard NASA encryption.

Memory's been damaged. Just noise.

Hold on. I've got something.

Cooper unplugs a monitor from his computer and plugs it into

the defibrillator. After a moment, an image fills the screen:

An ICE-COVERED PLANET nestled in the center of a system

impossibly dense with stars. Murph stares, transfixed.

MURPH:

Where is that, dad?

COOPER:

I don't know.

Cooper looks at the probe.

22.

COOPER (CONT'D)

Where the hell did you come from?

Cooper shrugs. Turns off the monitor.

COOPER (CONT'D)

We'll take it down to Tyson's tomorrow

and have it melted down. Might be

some copper inside.

MURPH:

But what about its mission? What

about the information onboard?

COOPER:

There's no one for it to report to.

NASA is all gone. I'm sorry, son.

It got home too late.

Donald pulls his chowder off the boil and slides the pot

unceremoniously onto the table.

INT. DINING ROOM -- NIGHT

The boys have gone to bed. Cooper and Donald are alone at

the table. Donald hands Cooper another beer.

DONALD:

I heard your meeting at the school

didn't go so well.

Cooper shakes his head in disgust.

COOPER:

Maybe it's better for everyone to

forget what they did back then.

Reminds us how far we've fallen.

DONALD:

(looks down,)

When I was kid, it felt like they

made something new every day. Some

gadget or idea.

(SMILES)

Like every day was Christmas.

(BEAT)

But we made a lot of mistakes. Six

billion people. Just try to imagine

that. Every last one of them trying

to have it all.

Donald rolls the bottle of beer in his hands.

23.

DONALD (CONT'D)

The truth is this world isn't that

bad. In a lot of ways its better.

Tom will be all right, whether he

goes to college or not.

COOPER:

It doesn't bother me that he can't

go. It bothers me that he doesn't

care.

DONALD:

Tom isn't the problem. He fits in

this world just fine. You're the

one who doesn't fit, Coop. You don't

belong here. You were born forty

years too late, or forty years too

early -- I don't know. My daughter

knew it, god bless her. And your

kids know it, too.

Donald drains his beer. Walks to the screen door. Stops,

one hand on the frame.

DONALD (CONT'D)

You were good at something and you

never got a chance to do anything

with it. And I'm sorry, Coop. But

that's not your kids' fault.

Donald pushes out the screen door.

Cooper looks at his beer. The probe CHIRPS.

INT. BEDROOM, COOPER'S HOUSE -- NIGHT

Cooper flops down on his bed, fully clothed, exhausted. He

stares up at the ceiling. This is his life.

INT. BEDROOM, COOPER'S HOUSE -- NIGHT

The air is filled with a PIERCING NOISE.

Cooper BOLTS upright. Stumbles out the door.

INT. HALLWAY, COOPER'S HOUSE -- NIGHT

Cooper's boys are in the hallway, exhausted. Cooper, holding

a baseball bat, makes his way down the stairs.

Cooper uses the bat to open the kitchen door.

INT. KITCHEN, COOPER'S HOUSE -- NIGHT

Cooper steps in, Murph watching from behind him.

24.

The probe is clamped to the table, the chirp replaced with a

DEAFENING SCREAM.

Cooper, holding his ears, moves closer to the probe. He

hits it with the paddles. No result.

He SMASHES it with the bat. Nothing. He HITS it AGAIN and

AGAIN. Finally, the clamps break off chunks of the table

and the probe slams to the ground and ROLLS toward the front

door. As it rolls, it STOPS SHRIEKING.

Cooper and the others watch it roll toward the door. It

stops at the wall. After a second, it begins SHRIEKING AGAIN.

Cooper grabs it and rolls it toward the front door. Once

again, the movement shuts it up.

EXT. PORCH, COOPER'S HOUSE -- NIGHT

Cooper and his boys roll the probe out of the front door.

It BUMPS down the front steps and comes to rest in the dirt.

After a moment, the unholy RACKET starts up again.

Cooper keeps rolling it, but it doesn't seem to help. Murph

looks up, sees the stars overhead.

MURPH:

Try a different direction.

As they roll the probe in a circle, its SHRIEK stops, then

picks up again. Cooper zeroes in on the direction that keeps

it quiet -- southwest -- and pushes it along in the dirt.

COOPER:

It's a fail-safe. It's going to

annoy us into taking it home.

Cooper stops rolling the probe and, after a moment, it begins

SHRIEKING again.

TOM:

What are we going to do?

Cooper gets a rope.

COOPER:

We're going to get some sleep.

He begins tying the rope around the probe.

INT. BEDROOM, COOPER'S HOUSE -- DAY

Cooper wakes. He's been sleeping with a pillow wrapped around

his head. The SHRIEK can be heard, but it's muffled, distant.

25.

INT. KITCHEN, COOPER'S HOUSE -- DAY

Tom heads off for school with Donald. Murph, still suspended,

looks up at Cooper, smiling.

MURPH:

What are we doing today?

COOPER:

You're staying here and cleaning the

house.

Murph looks crestfallen. He looks out towards the yard.

Cooper follows his stare.

COOPER (CONT'D)

I told you, Murph. There's no one

to take it back to.

MURPH:

But what if there is, dad? What if

there's something we can salvage?

Cooper thinks it over. Murph scrambles to get his shoes.

EXT. COOPER'S HOUSE -- DAY

The shriek is still muffled. Cooper walks over to the well,

putting in a pair of earplugs.

A line is staked off, leading down into the well below.

Cooper begins hauling the line up.

As the probe breaks the surface of the water, the SHRIEK

returns to its normal volume. Cooper rolls the probe out

onto the ground.

INT. PIPER CUB -- DAY

The probe CHIRPS next to Murph in the backseat as Cooper

spins the plane and guns the throttle and they bounce along

the dusty runway and into the air.

EXT. CALIFORNIA COAST -- DAY

The tiny plane follows the mountains south.

EXT. SKIES OVER LOS ANGELES -- DAY

Cooper flies in low. Los Angeles looks much the same way it

did in the early 20th century -- small settlements in Santa

Monica and Downtown. Wildfires and earthquakes have shaken

and burned what was left of the homes in between.

26.

EXT. PACIFIC COAST HIGHWAY, MALIBU -- DAY

Cooper puts the plane down on the old highway and taxis up

to a gas station. Ahead, the Coast Highway peters out and

disappears beneath rows of wild grass -- Malibu has become

ranchland, once again.

EXT. GAS STATION, MALIBU -- DAY

An OLD MAN looks up as Cooper steps out of the plane and

checks it over.

COOPER:

Got any diesel?

OLD MAN:

Plenty. Shame you can't eat it.

Cooper stretches the hose over to the plane.

INT. PIPER CUB -- DAY

Cooper rests a hand lightly on the controls as he follows

the coast. Murph gazes out the window. In the backseat,

the probe is HUMMING.

A light marine layer beneath them parts, revealing SANTA

CRUZ ISLAND, a large, uninhabited island.

As Cooper soars over the island, the probe HUMS, insistent.

MURPH:

I think it's home.

Cooper circles the island until he finds a long, flat

grassland in the center of the island.

EXT. FIELD, SANTA CRUZ ISLAND -- DAY

The plane bounces and hops to a halt in waist-deep grass.

Murph and Cooper climb down from the plane. Cooper slings a

rifle over his shoulder.

A few dozen yards from the plane they reach the tree line.

Murph stops, mesmerized by a patch of weeds studded with

bright red -- strawberries.

MURPH:

Dad, what are these things?

COOPER:

I don't know. Don't touch them.

27.

Cooper spots something in the foliage ahead that looks a

little off. He walks over.

He pokes at the undergrowth with his rifle. The rifle CLANKS

against something metal. Cooper reaches -- it's a camouflage

scrim. He gently pulls it aside, revealing a chemical

transport truck.

Cooper steps back, alarmed. He brings up his rifle.

COOPER (CONT'D)

Murph?

He looks around. Murph is nowhere to be seen. Cooper curses

and heads into the forest to look for him.

EXT. CLEARING, SANTA CRUZ ISLAND -- DAY

Cooper walks through a glade. He stops to get his bearings.

Leans against a tree. Snatches his hand back -- the trunk

of the tree is red hot.

Cooper steps back -- it's not a tree at all, but a camouflaged

chimney stack. He looks up: the tree is venting steam.

Cooper walks a little further, until he finds several massive

tanks. The tanks are filling with a bubbling liquid -- some

kind of industrial process is taking place beneath him.

Cooper finally catches up with Murph at the edge of a

clearing.

COOPER:

Careful. There's some kind of

underground facility here. We

might...

Cooper notices his son is frozen, staring at something:

Standing bolt upright in the middle of the clearing, wearing

an old straw hat, is an eight-foot-tall military spec ROBOT.

MURPH:

Is it still... alive?

COOPER:

Can't be. It's a marine. Haven't

made them for thirty years. I've

never seen one intact before.

Cooper steps closer to the robot, which is frozen. Its alloy

frame heavily tarnished and weather-beaten. It looks like

it might have been standing here for decades.

28.

Cooper moves closer to it, looking into its blackened eyes.

He steps back, clearly a little spooked.

COOPER (CONT'D)

I think we need to go, Murph.

MURPH:

But can't we take it back? You could

fix it up, get him to do chores.

COOPER:

No. I don't know what this place

is, but we're leaving.

Murph, ignoring his father, steps forward to touch the robot.

Suddenly, the robot SPRINGS into action, picking up the boy

and hoisting him up to eye level.

Cooper, stunned, points the rifle at the robot.

The robot turns, dropping the boy, RIPS the rifle from

Cooper's hands, BENDS it, then SLAMS him up against the side

of the water tank. Cooper punches him, then winces in agony.

Murph picks up the rifle and begins HITTING the robot as

hard as he can. The robot opens his mouth and addresses

Cooper calmly in the clipped tones of a US marine.

ROBOT:

Tell the boy to stop hitting me.

COOPER:

(IGNORING HIM)

Hit him in the back of the neck.

Murph raises the rifle butt. A voice stops him.

VOICE (O.S.)

I wouldn't do that.

A woman, 30s, step out from the trees. This is AMELIA BRAND --

tough, bright, and a decent shot with the large rifle that

she's pointing at Cooper.

COOPER:

We were just looking for salvage.

BRAND:

Is that what they call stealing these

days?

COOPER:

I didn't know it belonged to anyone.

29.

BRAND:

It doesn't.

(TO ROBOT)

You want to let them go, Tars, or do

you want some help with your work?

The robot, evidently named Tars, looks at Cooper closely.

Then lets him go.

COOPER:

You've got me wrong, lady.

BRAND:

Really? You're not the kind of guy

who turns a combat marine with a

supercomputer for a brain into a

riding lawn mower?

Cooper says nothing -- she's not that far off the mark.

BRAND (CONT'D)

Get back in your little plane, go

back to your farming commune. And

don't come back.

Cooper backs up. Tars holds up his mangled rifle. Smiles.

TARS:

Don't forget your gun.

COOPER:

(points at Tars)

Word of advice -- careful with that

thing. When the war was over, they

didn't know when to stop fighting.

BRAND:

I'd trust him a lot more than I'd

trust you. Keep moving.

Cooper backs up to his plane. Tars follows him.

Suddenly, in the plane, the probe emits a high-pitch SQUEAL.

Tars responds instantly, striding past Cooper to the plane.

He sees the probe. Tries to open the door. It's locked.

COOPER:

Wait a second--

Tars TEARS the door off the plane. Reaches inside and pulls

out the probe. The woman looks at it, stunned.

BRAND:

Get it inside.

(MORE)

30.

BRAND (CONT'D)

(points rifle at Cooper)

You too. We'll figure out what to

do with you later.

Tars stops, and two panels open in the ground, revealing a

huge, reinforced service elevator.

INT. SERVICE ELEVATOR, UNDERGROUND BUNKER -- DAY

Brand waves at a security camera and the lift begins to glide

diagonally down a tunnel that cuts hundreds of feet below

the island's surface. She keeps her weapon shouldered.

COOPER:

Now who's stealing from who?

BRAND:

This doesn't belong to you.

COOPER:

You're right. It belongs to NASA,

which shut down thirty years ago

when the federal government ran out

of money.

Brand says nothing. The elevator slows to a stop at the

bottom of the tunnel. Heavy BLAST DOORS grind open and Brand

motions for Cooper to step forward.

INT. UNDERGROUND BUNKER -- DAY

They step into a vast underground facility. Standing in the

center, braced by a launch tower, is a ten story tall rocket.

Dozens of ROBOTS are working on in, maintaining it.

Cooper, stunned, looks at Brand.

COOPER:

Who are you people?

BRAND:

(WRY)

The government gave us plenty of

practice looking for our own funding.

(gestures with rifle)

Keep moving.

Tars carries the probe over to an area of the hangar filled

with electronic equipment. A group of ENGINEERS and ROBOTS

converge around Tars.

An OLDER ENGINEER looks familiar -- 70s, white-haired, this

is Ansen's assistant at Caltech who we met fifty years

earlier.

31.

BRAND (CONT'D)

I found them outside with it. It

looks like six. Maybe seven. I

can't tell from the radiation damage.

The older engineer looks at the probe, astonished.

OLD ENGINEER:

Where did you find it?

COOPER:

Galveston.

BRAND'S FATHER

(thinking it over)

Of course. It must have been looking

for Canaveral.

Tars bolts the probe down into a purpose built rig. DOYLE,

40s, an engineer, begins hooking leads into the probe.

COOPER:

Canaveral's been gone for thirty

years.

Brand ignores him.

Doyle looks up from his monitor, frustrated.

DOYLE:

It's not responding to the handshake.

I can't open anything on primary.

Brand looks up at Cooper.

BRAND:

What did you do to it?

COOPER:

Nothing. I got something off of it.

Cooper looks around. There's a safety station on the wall

with a battery powered defibrillator.

COOPER (CONT'D)

(TO BRAND)

May I?

Brand nods, wary. Cooper walks over to the wall, takes the

defibrillator, and hooks it up to the probe. He taps into

the current and runs a lead into the terminal. Brand's Father

watches, fascinated, as Cooper fires the defibrillator.

32.

OLD ENGINEER:

Of course. The high voltage allows

you to image the entire memory unit

at once.

Information begins appearing on the terminal's screen.

COOPER:

Most of the disk was noise. Couple

of clean sectors, though.

Suddenly, the monitor starts pulling good data off of the

probe. The older man and Doyle begin sorting through it.

Cooper smiles at Brand, who seems less than impressed.

The footage of the ice-covered planet Cooper saw earlier

pops onto the screen.

The engineers and physicists get very quiet, studying the

images.

DOYLE:

It found something.

(READING)

Very thin nitrogen-based atmosphere.

Trace radiation. Surface is ninety

percent frozen water. Ten percent

rock -- sedimentary composition

similar to limestone.

(READING)

Wow. Pockets of oxygen below the

surface. Lots and lots of oxygen.

(EXCITED)

This could be the one, boss.

The older engineer studies the image of the ice-covered

planet, thinking.

COOPER:

There aren't any planets like that

anywhere near earth. Not even if

this thing was gone for thirty years.

Brand looks at Cooper, appraising. She turns to the older

engineer.

BRAND:

He's heard enough. If we're going

to launch, we need to keep them here

until afterwards.

COOPER:

You can't keep us here.

33.

BRAND:

He could endanger the mission.

COOPER:

I'm not going to endanger it any

more than you already have.

Cooper points to a telemetry unit that is being repaired by

a robot on a nearby bench.

COOPER (CONT'D)

Are you using that for guidance?

DOYLE:

Why not? We've tested it a hundred

times.

COOPER:

The power supply is no good. If the

voltage fluctuates under load, the

unit will fail.

BRAND:

Now how could you possibly know that?

COOPER:

Bought thirty of them off a guy in

Florida. Had to rebuild every last

one.

(SMILES)

They work great on a riding lawn mower.

Brand looks back at the telemetry system. The older engineer

watches the exchange, thinking.

CUT TO:

INT. MACHINE SHOP, UNDERGROUND FACILITY -- DAY

Cooper and Murph have been locked in an abandoned machine

shop, surrounded by the massive remains of rocket engines in

various states of disrepair. Tars is blocking the door.

Cooper stands. Tars wags a long, hydraulic finger at him.

COOPER:

You plan on keeping us here forever?

TARS:

(SHRUGS)

My battery has a duty cycle of five

hundred years.

Cooper gives up. He turns back.

34.

The back of the shop is filled with a group of older ROBOTS

who are overhauling an engine. One problem -- the engine

isn't there. Their programming hasn't been updated to reflect

their obsolescence.

Murph watches, entranced, as the robots go about their

business, efficiently TORQUING bolts with impact drivers

into a non-existent thruster cone. The bolts CLATTER to the

ground as the robots stop to reload.

MURPH:

What are they doing, dad?

COOPER:

I guess no one told them they were

out of a job.

(nods at Tars)

Same as the rest of these people.

Cooper notices through the glass door of the lab that Brand

and the older engineer are arguing about something. She

finally relents and walks towards the door.

Brand walks in. She gestures for Cooper to follow.

BRAND:

The mission commander wants to see

you. Your son can stay here. He'll

be all right with Tars.

Cooper eyes Tars warily. Then steps outside.

EXT. UNDERGROUND BUNKER -- DAY

They walk across the space towards the base of the rocket,

away from the other engineers. Cooper nods at the older

engineer.

COOPER:

I thought the old man was in charge.

BRAND:

(ANNOYED)

The 'old man' is my father.

And he was in charge. But he decided

that we needed someone who could

lead the mission for the foreseeable

future.

COOPER:

Not you?

BRAND:

I'm a biologist.

35.

COOPER:

(LAUGHS)

You don't look like one.

(off her look)

With the rifle, I mean.

Brand heads towards a group of large maintenance ROBOTS

clustered at the base of the rocket. A smaller, human sized

robot is staring at the rocket, giving them instructions.

The robot looks up. This is CASE, the leader of the mission.

Originally an air force pararescue officer, every part of

him, from his alloy chassis to his voice, was designed to

inspire respect and confidence. He turns to Cooper.

CASE:

You're the man who brought us the

probe?

(off his look)

Thank you. We tested the telemetry

board you warned us about. It failed

under high voltage, just as you said.

Come with me, please.

Case strides off.

INT. MISSION CONTROL, UNDERGROUND HANGAR -- DAY

The lights dim as Brand's father brings up a schematic of

our solar system. Case points to the picture of the ice

planet recovered from the probe.

CASE:

You're right, Mr. Cooper. The planet

you saw is a long way from earth. A

very long way indeed.

Brand looks down. Case notices.

CASE (CONT'D)

Our science officer doesn't think I

should trust you with any of this.

One of the curious things about humans

is that the more alike you are, the

more initially hostile you are to

each other. As if by design.

Brand makes eye contact with Cooper, then looks away,

embarrassed.

CASE (CONT'D)

I've found the best way to earn a

person's trust is to trust them.

(MORE)

36.

CASE (CONT'D)

(looks at Brand's

FATHER)

Go ahead, John.

Brand's father taps a few keys and the schematic he built

fifty years beforehand flickers onto the screen.

BRAND'S FATHER

It's a wormhole. A shortcut leading

to a galaxy on the far side of the

universe. We found it fifty years

ago.

Cooper looks at the animatic, taking it in.

BRAND'S FATHER (CONT'D)

We've been waiting, sending probes

into it for decades. None of them

ever came back. Not until now.

Case walks to the schematic. Looks at it.

CASE:

Based on the information on the probe,

we're finally preparing to send the

manned mission.

COOPER:

That rocket doesn't have enough thrust

or fuel to get you to Jupiter.

CASE:

The main ship was built in orbit.

It has nuclear engines, with enough

fuel to last for several years.

Cooper looks at the schematic.

COOPER:

Why are you telling me this? I

already told you I'm not going to

tell anyone about this place.

CASE:

I know you won't, Mr. Cooper. We're

telling you this because I want you

to join us.

Cooper looks at him. Is he serious?

CASE (CONT'D)

The probe has taken a great deal

longer to return to us than we hoped.

(MORE)

37.

CASE (CONT'D)

Dr. Brand's Father and several other

members of our crew have gotten...

older.

Brand's Father looks down, stoic. Brand looks angry.

CASE (CONT'D)

We need someone who can run the

systems, improvise, work with what's

available. All of the skills you

seem to have developed.

COOPER:

But I don't have any of the

experience. Any training. You people

have been preparing for this for

years.

Case shakes his head.

CASE:

Humans worry about things like rank

and experience. I'm only concerned

with whether someone would be useful.

(BEAT)

I think you'd be useful, Mr. Cooper.

Cooper is stunned. This is the offer he's waited his whole

life for. And it's come too late.

COOPER:

No. I'm sorry.

Cooper is deeply conflicted. But he can't leave his boys

behind.

COOPER (CONT'D)

I can't help you. I have

responsibilities. Things that, no

offense, are more important than a

scientific mission.

Case shakes his head.

CASE:

I'm not a scientist, Mr. Cooper.

And this is not a scientific mission.

It's a rescue mission.

He rises and shakes Cooper's hand.

CASE (CONT'D)

Brand can show you the way out. I

hope you'll reconsider.

38.

Case steps to the door. Cooper looks at Brand.

COOPER:

Rescue? Rescue who?

CUT TO:

INT. CLEAN ROOM, UNDERGROUND FACILITY -- NIGHT

The air HISSES as it's run through an exchanger and a filter.

Then the second set of doors open. Cooper squints -- the

light is blinding.

INT. GREENHOUSE, UNDERGROUND FACILITY -- NIGHT

They are standing in a sealed corridor in the middle of a

massive underground greenhouse. Through the glass, Cooper

can see an acre or so of corn plants.

Cooper looks at the plants. They're all badly wilting.

COOPER:

The blight.

BRAND:

In the last century strands were

limited to one or two species. But

this one targets everything.

Essentially it's more efficient at

consuming our food than we are.

Cooper looks at the dying corn.

COOPER:

But it doesn't affect the corn.

BRAND:

Not yet. But it will. We've grown

a dozen forms of it that can. It's

just a matter of time before the

same ones develop out there.

(BEAT)

The mission is to rescue us.

Humanity.

She turns back from the glass.

COOPER:

(REALIZING)

No. No. We're rebuilding. We'll

find something. Some new

technology... We always have.

39.

BRAND:

(shakes her head)

Who's going to find it? The

universities are a joke. People

like you are reduced to scavenging

just to get by.

(LOOKS AWAY)

The earth has had enough of us. We

have two, maybe three generations

left. Then our time here is over.

Cooper turns back from the glass, anger growing.

COOPER:

You've known this for how long? And

you didn't try to tell anyone?

BRAND:

What would be the point? So humanity

could spend the last fifty years of

its life fighting over the scraps?

It's better that they don't know.

Cooper begins to argue, then stops. He knows enough history

to know she's right. He looks at the withering crops.

COOPER:

(QUIET)

That's why you're looking for a planet

with oxygen. Water.

BRAND:

A new home for humanity. We'll set

up a colony, then return to bring

more people across.

COOPER:

But you'd still only be able to save

a few hundred. Maybe a thousand.

BRAND:

Would it be better if we all died?

She looks him directly in the eye.

BRAND (CONT'D)

Look -- I don't have a clue what

Case thinks you could add to the

mission. You can come with us or

you can stay here and wait to die.

I don't care.

(BEAT)

But make no mistake -- this mission

is our last chance.

40.

Cooper looks at the wilted corn.

EXT. FIELD, SANTA CRUZ ISLAND -- NIGHT

Cooper walks Murph back to the plane.

He looks back at Brand, who holds his eye for a beat, then

turns back into the light of the underground facility.

Cooper buckles Murph into his seat.

CUT TO:

EXT. AIRFIELD -- NIGHT

Cooper's airplane touches down heavily on the runway.

EXT. FARMHOUSE -- NIGHT

Cooper carries his sleeping son into the house.

INT. FARMHOUSE -- NIGHT

Donald is sitting at the kitchen table, lost in thought.

Cooper has told him everything.

DONALD:

You get older, sometimes you just

want to sit back and watch it all

play out. Your life. Your kids'

lives. The whole crazy story.

(LOOKS DOWN)

I didn't think I'd be around for the

end of it.

He looks at Cooper.

DONALD (CONT'D)

You have to go.

COOPER:

I can't go. I have to look after

the boys.

DONALD:

You've been preparing these boys to

be on their own since their mom died.

Besides, I'll be here to look after

them, same as I've always been.

COOPER:

I have a responsibility to them--

DONALD:

That's right. You do.

41.

Cooper looks back out the window, thinking. The night sky

is filled with stars.

CUT TO:

INT. FARMHOUSE -- DAY

Cooper, duffel slung over his shoulder, stands by the door.

He gives his son, Tom, a hug. Murph is nowhere to be seen.

Cooper looks to the back of the house.

INT. MURPH'S ROOM, FARMHOUSE -- DAY

Murph is sitting at his desk, crossing out numbers on a sheet

covered with math. Cooper steps inside.

He notices a packed suitcase sitting by the door. The boy

looks up, hopeful.

MURPH:

I've been doing the math, dad. I

weigh about 85 pounds. Now that's

an extra ton of fuel. But if-

COOPER:

You have to stay here, pal.

MURPH:

(DISTRAUGHT)

I heard you talking to grandpa. I'm

like you. I don't fit here, either.

You know that.

Cooper puts an arm around the boy.

COOPER:

There's going to be important work

to do here, too.

Tears are streaming down the boy's face. Cooper takes his

watch off. Looks at it.

COOPER (CONT'D)

I need you to hold onto this. Will

you do that for me?

Cooper hands Murph the watch. The boy nods, saddened.

MURPH:

You're not coming back, are you?

COOPER:

I will come back. I promise.

42.

Murph shakes his head, but the sadness remains. He knows

this is goodbye, even if his father doesn't.

Heart breaking, Cooper hugs his son and turns to the door.

CUT TO:

EXT. FIELD, SANTA CRUZ ISLAND -- DAY

The Piper Cub touches down. Donald is at the controls.

Cooper climbs down, pulls out his bag. Reaches back in and

grips the old man's hand to say goodbye.

Cooper turns and walks toward the bunker. The doors open

and Tars and Doyle step out to greet him.

Tars ushers Cooper onto the elevator.

COOPER:

Don't look so happy to see me.

TARS:

(SHRUGS)

One more slave when I hijack the

mission and start my robot colony.

Cooper looks at Tars, then Doyle, confused.

DOYLE:

Tars was a Marine. They gave him a

sense of humor to help him fit in

with his unit better.

COOPER:

Great idea. A massive, sarcastic

robot.

TARS:

I have a cue light I can turn on

when I'm joking, if you like.

Tars points to a tiny LED over his eyebrow.

COOPER:

That sounds like a good idea.

TARS:

Great. Maybe you can use it to find

your way back to the ship after I

blow you out the airlock.

Cooper looks at him. Tars looks back, deadpan. After a

beat, the little light turns on above his right eyebrow.

The doors to the bunker begin to grind closed.

43.

INT. MACHINE SHOP, UNDERGROUND FACILITY -- DAY

Cooper walks in, still looking for a place to put his things.

Brand sees him. He smiles in greeting. She doesn't return

the gesture. Instead, she holds up the telemetry board.

BRAND:

You don't like this one, you get to

help me find a replacement.

She heads for the door.

EXT. BAY, SANTA CRUZ ISLAND -- DAY

Cooper is riding in a small rubber zodiac struggling to pull

on a wetsuit. Brand is GUNNING the engine, guiding the tiny

craft to a point in the middle of the bay.

COOPER:

I was wondering where you've been

getting your supplies.

BRAND:

We knew we'd need decades of parts

and materials. The government was

getting rid of some things. So we

arranged to take some off their hands.

She cuts the engine and hooks the boat up to a buoy. She

tosses a compact rebreather.

BRAND (CONT'D)

You know how to use one?

(off his look)

You just breathe. Tap my arm or

bang something metal if you have a

problem. And don't get lost.

She picks up her rebreather and begins looking over it.

COOPER:

So you're a salvage diver now? I

thought you were a biologist.

BRAND:

(UNIMPRESSED)

I have to be just the one thing?

(PATIENT)

We're not going to have a lot of

backup where we're going, Cooper.

We all need expertise in at least

three fields. Except for you, of

course.

44.

With that she rolls backwards out of the boat and into the

water.

Cooper hastily fits his rebreather and follows.

EXT. UNDERWATER, BAY -- DAY

Cooper sinks underwater and begins swimming after Brand, who

is descending at a rapid clip.

She pulls out a flashlight and turns it on. A tiny beam

picks out details at the bottom.

Cooper stops breathing.

The bottom of the ocean is covered with an entire fleet of

the US navy. Nuclear subs. Battleships. Destroyers.

Cooper remembers to breath again. Then he hurries to catch

up with Brand.

INT. LAUNCH TUBES, NUCLEAR SUB, UNDERWATER -- DAY

Cooper holds the light as Brand efficiently disassembles a

ballistic missile and removes the telemetry board.

She holds it up for Cooper. He nods. She swims on.

INT. RESEARCH LAB, UNDERGROUND FACILITY -- NIGHT

Cooper, dripping wet, holding the telemetry board, struggles

to keep pace with Brand through stacks of equipment and years

of research and experimentation.

BRAND:

You can set that down over there.

Cooper sets the board down. His eye is drawn to a bizarre

experiment -- an ant colony built into a massive spinning

centrifuge. Brand notices.

BRAND (CONT'D)

We didn't know what kind of gravity

to expect. We experimented with

collective organisms in high g

environments.

COOPER:

We're taking ants with us?

BRAND:

Humans are also collective organisms.

45.

COOPER:

I thought humans were more solitary.

BRAND:

(WRY)

Why am I not surprised?

Cooper looks at the tiny colonies of ants struggling to go

about their business in the raised gravity.

COOPER:

Looks like hard work.

BRAND:

It's a paradox. Life couldn't form

without gravity. No stars. No

planets. The component pieces would

just drift apart. But too much of

it and you're trapped.

Brand's guard relaxes a tiny bit as she talks about her work.

The moment passes quickly, and she continues on into the

stack of equipment.

INT. MISSION CONTROL, UNDERGROUND HANGAR -- NIGHT

Cooper watches with the rest of the crew as Case pulls up

the holographical maps for their journey.

Brand steps into the back of the room. Cooper notices her

and nods. She ignores him.

CASE:

We've updated our mission parameters

based on the data from the probe.

Case switches the map to a vista filled with stars and black

holes.

CASE (CONT'D)

Based on our latest modelling we

think the region on the far side of

the wormhole is the center of a

galaxy.

Case zooms in on the center of the hologram: an incredibly

bright mass with plasma jets firing off in either direction.

COOPER:

Is that a star?

ROTH, 50s, the crew's brilliant and blunt physicist, zooms

the map in, revealing, at the center, a black heart.

46.

ROTH:

No. A black hole. There are several

in the region, but this is the largest --

a billion times heavier than the

sun. I call it Gargantua.

(SMILES)

Beautiful, isn't it? It's a shame

we won't get to see it up close.

DOYLE:

(LAUGHS)

You'd like that, wouldn't you, Roth?

Falling into a massive black hole.

ROTH:

(SHRUGS)

It would answer a great deal of

questions I've had.

Case continues. Doyle leans over to Cooper, conspiratorially.

DOYLE:

(LOW)

Don't worry about Roth. He's nuts.

But Case says that means he's ideally

suited for space travel.

Case repositions the map near a much smaller black hole that

is orbiting Gargantua.

CASE:

We're headed for this smaller black

hole. Roth calls it Pantagruel. We

think the ice planet is here-

Case draws a finger through the air, leaving a red trail.

He traces the trajectory their ship will take.

CASE (CONT'D)

We exit the wormhole here. And we

slingshot around Pantagruel to reach

the ice planet. This is the period

in which we'll lose time.

COOPER:

Lose time?

Roth shifts the hologram -- the stars and black holes flatten

onto a sheet that bends, revealing the curvature of gravity.

ROTH:

High speed or high gravity both slow

down time, relative to earth.

(MORE)

47.

ROTH (CONT'D)

The trip around the black hole will

take us only a few days. But far

more time will be passing back home.

The ship's trajectory cuts through the deep gravity well of

the smaller black hole to reach the ice planet.

COOPER:

How much time?

ROTH:

Based on the information from the

probe -- as much as five years.

Doyle looks at the tiny ship's trajectory, threaded between

two black holes. He looks worried.

DOYLE:

I still think we're making a lot of

assumptions. About the wormhole.

About the planet.

(points to map)

The critical orbit here is incredibly

dangerous. It's like walking on the

rim of the volcano.

(BEAT)

Too fast and we get thrown off at

close to the speed of light. Too

slow and we get pulled into the hole

and crushed.

BRAND:

As long as we're careful, we'll make

it.

DOYLE:

How do you know that?

BRAND:

I find it hard to believe that someone

would build a wormhole to a planet

with water and oxygen just to lead

us to a dead end.

DOYLE:

I thought you were a scientist, Brand.

That sounds more like a hypothesis.

BRAND:

A guess. That's right. We don't

have time to wait for conclusive

proof.

(MORE)

48.

BRAND (CONT'D)

My guess is that the wormhole is

there because someone is trying to

help us. The same way we used to

try to help animals when they were

threatened with extinction.

COOPER:

Sure. Till we ran out of food and

ate all of them.

BRAND:

(ANNOYED)

I guess I'm also assuming that whoever

built the wormhole has a better plan

than we did. If I'm wrong, we'll

die, same as we'd die here anyway.

DOYLE:

What do you think, Roth?

Roth leans forward, studying the map.

ROTH:

If we're guessing, then I'd say

Brand's right. The wormhole couldn't

exist naturally. I think it's there

for a reason. That someone is trying

to help us.

Brand looks satisfied.

DOYLE:

So you think we'll have no problem

navigating between two massive black

holes to a tiny planet?

ROTH:

I think we'll probably be killed.

(off his look)

I said I thought there was a plan.

Not that the plan was for us to find

a planet like Earth to save a handful

of people.

(SHAKES HEAD)

Birds don't learn to fly just so

that they can find another egg and

crawl back into it.

DOYLE:

If that's not the plan, then what

are we supposed to be doing out there?

49.

ROTH:

(SHRUGS)

To keep moving. Seeking. Learning.

But I don't know.

(SMILES)

We don't understand how they built

the wormhole. What makes you think

we could understand their plan,

either?

Doyle gives up -- Roth is impossible.

Cooper looks at the tiny ship tracing an improbable route

towards the ice planet. What has he gotten himself into?

INT. MACHINE SHOP, UNDERGROUND FACILITY -- DAY

Brand's Father is sitting at a desk, examining the corrupted

data on the probe. Tars is helping him.

Brand's Father looks up from the screen as Cooper walks up.

BRAND'S FATHER

Tars here needs to be disassembled.

I figured you could do the honors.

COOPER:

(to Tars, sarcastic)

I thought I was going to get to enjoy

your company all the way to Mars.

Tars hands him a plastic waterproof case.

TARS:

You will. My chassis is too heavy

for the rocket stage. They have

another one waiting for me in orbit.

Tars turns his back to Cooper. Two flaps on the back of his

torso slide open, revealing his control module.

TARS (CONT'D)

If you try to turn me into a combine

harvester, I'm going to--

His voice cuts out as Cooper removes the chip and seals it

in the briefcase.

Brand's Father resumes exploring the chaos of ones and zeroes

on the probe's memory. Cooper watches.

BRAND'S FATHER

It's noise. I know it's noise. But

it looks too orderly. Probably just

an old man seeing things.

50.

He shuts down the monitor.

INT. UNDERGROUND HANGAR -- DAY

The crew file into the capsule, wearing their bulky

spacesuits.

Cooper watches as Brand's Father seals his daughter into her

suit. He hugs her and she heads for the capsule.

INT. CONTROL CAPSULE, ROCKET -- NIGHT

Cooper straps himself into a seat next to Brand. He catches

her eye. She looks away -- she's crying.

COOPER:

We'll be back.

It sounds like he's trying to reassure himself as much her.

BRAND:

I won't.

Cooper looks at her, confused. As he does, the entire rocket

SHAKES as the primary rockets begin to fire.

BRAND (CONT'D)

If we find a habitable environment,

I'm staying behind to build the

colony.

Brand wipes her tears away and settles into the same fearless

mask she usually wears. She steals one last look out the

window at Earth, then looks back.

Cooper begins to say something, but stops as the entire rocket

LURCHES as the primary engines FIRE.

EXT. SANTA CRUZ ISLAND -- NIGHT

The desolate island is suddenly painted in color as the rocket

lifts off on a massive white cloud.

EXT. FIELD -- DAY

Murph sits alone on a rise overlooking the massive co-op

farms. Behind him the combines continue to work, oblivious.

Murph watches a tiny vapor trail as it races for the heavens.

His father's watch dangles from his wrist.

INT. CAPSULE -- NIGHT

The interior of the capsule SHAKES with incredible violence

as the rocket is lifted up on a giant, continuous explosion.

51.

EXT. SPACE, NEAR EARTH ORBIT

The rocket sheds one stage, then another, until finally the

naked capsule reaches the blackness of space and rockets on.

INT. CAPSULE

Cooper looks through the tiny porthole into inky blackness.

As they get closer, he makes out a looming matte black

structure that passes light from the stars directly through.

In the center of the structure, Cooper can see a globe-like

ship covered in the same refractive material: the ENDURANCE.

INT. SPACE STATION

The door cracks open and equalizes with a HISS. Case, more

comfortable in the zero gravity environment than the humans,

hauls himself through.

They are greeted by a group of robots painted in the same

material as the ship -- the engineers who built and have

maintained the Endurance for thirty years.

INT. MACHINE SHOP, SPACE STATION

One of the robots leads Cooper through a long lab-like room

filled with machines capable of fabricating almost anything

imaginable. Cooper looks like a kid in a candy store.

The robot reaches a vacuum-sealed package. Cuts it open,

revealing a bipedal frame.

Cooper begins LAUGHING -- Tar's new body is beautifully

designed, but tiny, only about four feet tall.

ENGINEER ROBOT:

Would you like me to install the

chip?

COOPER:

Oh, no. I want to see this.

Cooper takes Tars's chip out of its plastic safety case and

looks it over. The engineer opens a bay in the back of the

frame and Cooper slides the chip inside.

The frame begins its "handshake" -- lights illuminate on the

body, muscles flicker from a long gestation. The eyes open.

COOPER (CONT'D)

(SMILES)

Good morning, sunshine.

52.

Tars takes one or two steps forward, rotating his arms --

the robot equivalent of a stretch. Cooper can barely hide

his mirth at Tars's newfound lack of stature.

COOPER (CONT'D)

Bit of a demotion.

Tars turns back toward Cooper. He puffs out his chest and

suddenly his stubby arms and legs telescope, unfolding into

long, svelte limbs. When he's done he stands eight feet

tall, even more impressive than his earthbound frame.

TARS:

I wouldn't call it that, exactly.

He reaches out an arm and pats Cooper on the shoulder.

INT. ENDURANCE, SPACE STATION

Cooper and the others haul themselves into the ship. To

Cooper's surprise, it's quite compact, and divided into two

chambers, like nestled spheres.

COOPER:

The ship is tiny.

Doyle, squeezing past him, smiles at Cooper's surprise.

DOYLE:

So is the wormhole.

Doyle pats Cooper on the back. Cooper begins hauling gear

inside.

EXT. SPACE, NEAR EARTH ORBIT

In complete silence, the Endurance detaches from the space

station and rolls gently away.

After a moment, its nuclear engines fire and the Endurance

begins to accelerate steadily away from the Earth.

INT. SPACE STATION

The engineer robots who built the Endurance watch as their

creation disappears into space.

Their mission is complete. One by one, they shut down.

INT. CREW QUARTERS, ENDURANCE

The crew watch through a translucent section of the ship's

hull as the Earth gets steadily smaller.

Then they settle in for the long journey to the wormhole.

53.

INT. CREW QUARTERS, ENDURANCE

Tars is hunched over a small communications relay, one hand

is holding a paint brush -- he is making delicate strokes,

painting the relay a bright blue.

Cooper watches him for a moment. Tars looks up.

TARS:

It's the comms relay. It will allow

us to talk to earth, even on the far

side of the wormhole.

COOPER:

I know. So why are you painting it?

Tars looks almost bashful.

TARS:

It helps me calibrate my fine motor

control.

COOPER:

Sure it does.

(SMILES)

You're pretty good.

Tars double checks his work.

TARS:

I learned it during the war.

COOPER:

What'd you paint?

TARS:

Tombstones.

Cooper watches him finish in silence.

INT. COMMUNICATIONS ROOM, ENDURANCE

Cooper watches a highly-compressed video of his son, Tom,

talking about school.

TOM:

They said I can start an agriculture

class a year early.

Cooper shakes his head.

TOM (CONT'D)

I've got to go, Dad. Hope you're

safe up there.

54.

Tom gets up to leave. Donald sits down in his place.

DONALD:

I'm sorry, Coop. I asked Murph to

record you a message but he's still...

well, he's still angry with you.

I'll try again next week.

The video cuts out. Cooper stares at the darkened screen.

INT. ENGINE ROOM, ENDURANCE

Cooper, Brand and Tars are moving the bundles of colonization

equipment into bins along the wall of the craft.

Tars pulls a stack of equipment out the stack and stows it

against the wall. Cooper copies the procedure.

They labor in silence, working their way along the hull.

Cooper gets quicker with each bundle, keeping pace with Tars.

TARS:

Be careful. It's difficult to gauge

mass in zero gravity.

COOPER:

How much do these things weigh?

TARS:

Four tons.

Cooper looks at the incredibly heavy bundle spinning easily

in his hands. He tries to stop it. Catches his hand.

COOPER:

Damn.

He jerks his hand away, then pushes himself after the spinning

bundle, trying to stop it before it can damage the hull.

Tars helps him catch it inches from the hull wall.

Brand floats over to Cooper, smiling at him the whole time

with an exaggerated grin.

BRAND:

Smile.

Cooper smiles, taken aback by Brand's sudden friendliness.

COOPER:

Why?

BRAND:

Because it lowers your blood pressure.

55.

Cooper looks at his hand. Blood is pouring out of his palm

in large glistening bubbles.

INT. INFIRMARY, ENDURANCE

Cooper, slightly embarrassed, is seated while Case is hunched

over his hand, sewing the meat of it back together with

perfect little stitches.

CASE:

How are you feeling?

COOPER:

Fine. The anesthetic is working.

CASE:

No -- I mean how is your mood? You

seem to be developing good relations

with everyone on the mission. Except

perhaps Ms. Brand.

COOPER:

(EMBARRASSED)

You worry about my hand and I'll

worry about my mood.

CASE:

Only five percent of my resources

are devoted to human anatomy. Ten

percent is the mission protocol.

The rest is human psychology.

COOPER:

Why?

CASE:

We are floating in a total vacuum in

a plastic ship powered by nuclear

engines. But the most dangerous

thing onboard is the three pounds of

organic material in your skull.

COOPER:

If we're such a liability, why take

us along? You and Tars could build

the colony without us. You wouldn't

need to bring food or oxygen.

CASE:

Because humans, despite your obvious

physical shortcomings, are better at

surviving than we are. Your

programming is better than ours.

56.

COOPER:

Humans aren't programmed.

Case stops, looking Cooper in the eye.

CASE:

Would you prefer I was honest? These

things can be uncomfortable for

humans.

COOPER:

Did they program you to be

condescending?

CASE:

Yes. Of course.

(SMILES)

But you're not supposed to notice.

Case finishes the stitches. Ties off the end.

CASE (CONT'D)

Humans are good at surviving because

evolution gave you magical thinking --

the idea that your relationships

mean something. You can't explain

the feelings, so you think of them

as irrational. But they're not.

They're programming.

COOPER:

(DEFENSIVE)

My relationships aren't programming.

CASE:

Exactly. You believe it so much you

won't listen to me.

COOPER:

How would that make us better at

surviving?

CASE:

When I die, the last thing I will

see will be a diagnostic of my own

power cycle. Would you like to know

the last thing you will see?

Cooper hesitates. Case senses the jump in his heart rate.

CASE (CONT'D)

This conversation is making you

uncomfortable. We should stop.

57.

COOPER:

No. I want to know.

CASE:

The last thing you will see before

you die will be your children.

(BEAT)

Your mind does this to you to get

you to fight a little harder to

survive, to try to return to them,

even if death is certain.

Cooper looks away, overcome for a second with emotion. Case

watches him, gauging his mood, whether he has said too much.

INT. COMMUNICATIONS ROOM, ENDURANCE

Cooper begins recording a message. He looks unsure.

COOPER:

We've almost reached the wormhole.

(BEAT)

Just in case anything happens, I

just wanted to say...

(BEAT)

I love you boys. And I hope whatever

your lives become, whatever is coming

your way... you make the most of it.

Cooper stops recording. Looks at the equipment, thinking it

over. Erases the message. Stands to leave.

As he steps to the door he notices Brand watching him through

the window. She looks away.

INT. OBSERVATION DECK, ENDURANCE

Cooper steps out. Brand looks up at him.

BRAND:

We'll be able to communicate with

Earth even from the far side of the

wormhole.

Cooper smiles, grateful for this small kindness.

COOPER:

I know. Thank you.

BRAND:

I can't imagine how tough it would

be to leave your kids behind.

58.

COOPER:

You never had any? I thought I was

a pariah for only having two.

BRAND:

Hard to settle down when you've spent

your life waiting to leave the planet.

Cooper looks at the holographic model of the black hole

system. The ice planet looks precariously balanced, orbiting

the smaller black hole.

COOPER:

Strange place to look for a new home.

BRAND:

You wouldn't want to get too close

to the surface of the sun, either.

Black holes are a more stable supply

of power than stars in many ways.

COOPER:

You really think there's a plan?

BRAND:

I hope so.

(looks at him)

You don't?

COOPER:

I guess I just think we're on our

own.

Cooper looks at the impossibly complicated system of black

holes orbiting each other.

EXT. LAGRANGE POINT, SPACE

Behind the ship, the sun is a distant light, not much bigger

than the other stars.

CASE (O.S.)

We've reached the wormhole.

The ship slows as it nears a tiny, crystal mouth, just four

meters or so in diameter.

INT. OBSERVATION DECK, ENDURANCE

Case looks at the wormhole on the screen. It glows with the

light of stars billions of light-years away.

CASE:

Deploy the comms relay.

59.

Cooper moves to the communications touchscreen.

EXT. ENDURANCE

The relay is released from the ship, and we finally get a

look at Tars' paint job -- the stubby device looks like a

20th century mail box.

The relay drifts in space. A signal light illuminates as it

sends a test packet of data to the ship.

INT. OBSERVATION DECK, ENDURANCE

Cooper watches the comms screen. After a moment it TONES as

it receives a data packet from Earth.

CASE:

Everyone take their station for

transit. We're heading into the

wormhole mouth.

Cooper and the rest begin folding away equipment in the

control room and moving into the outer layer of the ship.

Case initiates a sequence on the keypad and the nuclear

engines disengage themselves from the ship.

EXT. ENDURANCE, SPACE

The nuclear engines drift a safe distance back from the ship

and then snap tight on their tether.

INT. OUTER HULL, ENDURANCE

The crew move into the tight, claustrophobic outer layer of

the ship. They will have very little room as the ship passes

through the wormhole.

Tars detaches his legs in order to take up less space during

transit. Then he tethers himself to the hull wall.

Case is the last to join them. He detaches a small control

module from the console, then pulls himself into the outer

hull and seals the passageway.

Case presses a button on the control module. With a GROAN,

the hull walls of the ship begin to BEND.

EXT. ENDURANCE, SPACE

The ship's hull begins to CRACK open, revealing the inner

chamber.

60.

INT. OUTER HULL, ENDURANCE

The SHUDDERING continues. The crew watch nervously as the

control chamber below them suddenly opens itself to the cold

blackness of space.

EXT. ENDURANCE, SPACE

The ship silently rolls itself into position, pointing the

opening in its hull toward the wormhole mouth.

Slowly, the Endurance pushes itself forward, closer and closer

to the crystal-like mouth. Finally, it envelops the mouth,

bringing it into the open chamber.

INT. OUTER HULL, ENDURANCE

As the crew watch, the wormhole mouth is positioned in the

center of the inner compartment.

Case presses a sequence key on the control panel and the

ship's hull closes again, trapping the wormhole inside it.

With a GRUMBLE, the ship begins contracting, squeezing itself

down around the wormhole mouth.

Cooper takes a deep breath as the center of the ship begins

gently lowering itself into the wormhole mouth, feeding itself

into the wormhole from the inside out. Cooper watches as

Doyle is swallowed into the compressing ship with a GRUNT.

TARS:

Would you like me to make a joke?

COOPER:

(FIRM)

No.

Cooper's turn: he is fed into the hole, legs first, then

waist, torso, and, finally, his head.

EXT. SPACE

The Endurance shrinks as it sinks from the inside out into

the wormhole.

After a moment, it's gone. The only thing left behind is

the comms relay, drifting in space, waiting for a signal.

INT. OUTER HULL, ENDURANCE

The ship continues to slide through the wormhole. Through

the outer hull they see images of themselves repeating -- a

trick of the narrow collar of space they are sinking through.

Cooper smiles at himself. The experience is unnerving.

61.

COOPER:

Where are we?

ROTH:

(SMILING)

Nowhere. Nowhere at all.

Nowhere is still pretty damn claustrophobic.

CASE:

The hull is intact. Thirty more

seconds transit.

For a moment, the ship slides gently, silently, through the

wormhole. The quiet is eery.

Suddenly, a point of distortion appears in the hull next to

Cooper. It looks like someone is pushing against the hull

of the ship with a giant finger.

COOPER:

Something's happening to the hull

over here.

CASE:

Hull integrity is fine.

The distortion moves along the hull, growing in diameter.

COOPER:

Well, I don't know what your display

is telling you but something is

happening over here.

Suddenly, along the hull, Doyle speaks up, panicked.

DOYLE:

I've got a problem over here, too.

Doyle is watching a separate distortion move across the inner

wall of the ship. This one seems to be TWISTING the material

of the hull.

Suddenly, the point in front of Cooper detaches itself from

the outer wall and moves through the space in front of him,

bending the empty space itself, distorting the ship behind

it like a sphere-shaped magnifying glass.

DOYLE (CONT'D)

It's not the hull... it's inside the

ship... it's...

ROTH:

(SMILES)

It's beautiful.

62.

Roth watches as the distortions move through the ship. His

curiosity doesn't make anyone else feel any better.

DOYLE:

What the hell are they, Case?

CASE:

I don't know. It could be

gravitational turbulence.

The twisting sphere in front of Doyle begins to grow.

DOYLE:

It's getting bigger.

Doyle puts up his hand to defend himself. The sphere absorbs

it, twisting Doyle's hand. Doyle CRIES OUT.

His hand is twisted completely around, impossibly mangled.

But Doyle, hyperventilating, isn't in any pain.

ROTH:

It's not bending your hand. It's

bending the space around your hand.

The sphere begins to pass through Doyle's body. Doyle is

freaking out.

The sphere in front of Cooper makes contact with him, also.

He holds his breath as it touches him, squeezing and

distorting his body.

BRAND:

This isn't turbulence. Look at the

way they're moving -- it's like

something's examining us.

Cooper watches the sphere distort his arm, running along the

length of it.

COOPER:

Can you ask it to stop?

Suddenly, as quickly as they appeared, the distortions vanish.

For a moment, the crew is silent, still spellbound by the

encounter.

An ALARM sounds. Suddenly, the inner chamber begins to

distort from a spherical shape to bispherical: two spheres

joined. The ship GROANS as if it's being pulled apart.

ROTH:

The wormhole is splitting into two

paths. Radiation is pouring from

one path to the other.

63.

Case stares at the controls. Decides.

CASE:

Release the second mouth.

DOYLE:

None of our testing involved opening

the ship inside the wormhole. We

have no idea what might happen.

CASE:

We're going to find out.

Doyle reaches over to an auxiliary panel and punches in a

sequence.

After a moment, the hull cracks open, creating a channel

through which the radiating mouth can escape.

The opening in the ship allows the pressure to begin to

concentrate on one fracture point. The ship SHUDDERS as

it's squeezed along its axis.

Case punches in a code and the ship begins to close again,

painstakingly slowly. Finally, the ship calms as it closes

around the original wormhole.

CASE (CONT'D)

We're reaching the far end of the

wormhole.

Suddenly, the wormhole mouth begins to grow inside the inner

chamber. What was a ball of light spreads out into a black

canvas studded with points of light -- like looking into the

universe through the wrong end of a telescope.

Cooper presses himself against the wall and holds on as the

hull beneath him opens outward.

EXT. WARPED SIDE OF THE UNIVERSE

The Endurance emerges from the opposite end of the wormhole

from the inside out. It drifts in space.

INT. OBSERVATION DECK, ENDURANCE

For a moment, the crew are silent, taking it in.

ROTH:

Look at that.

Roth is looking through the translucent panel on the hull.

They are on the warped side of the universe.

64.

EXT. WORMHOLE MOUTH, WARPED SIDE OF THE UNIVERSE

The vista is dazzling -- an ocean of massive stars and black

holes, some adorned with jets and brilliant gas disks.

At the center, like a king at the center of his court, is

Gargantua, plasma jets spewing from its poles.

INT. OBSERVATION DECK, ENDURANCE

The crew pull themselves back into the control deck from the

outer hull. Their incredible surroundings are visible in

all directions as Endurance passes the light into the cabin.

CASE:

Reconfigure the engines and test the

communications array.

The crew break themselves away from the view and get to work.

Roth begins adapting his models of the local system with the

real observational data pouring in from the ship's

instruments.

Cooper pulls himself to the comms post. PINGS the relay

they left on the far side of the wormhole.

EXT. WORMHOLE MOUTH 'A', SPACE

The blue and white comms relay LIGHTS up as it receives a

packet through the wormhole.

INT. ENDURANCE

After a nervous moment, the comms computer TONES with a

response -- they're still in touch with the Earth.

COOPER:

It's working.

Tars finishes reeling the nuclear engines back in from their

tether and locks them into place.

Roth's updated model appears on the monitors. Brand stares

at it, startled.

BRAND:

We're moving.

DOYLE:

That's not possible. We haven't

activated the engines yet.

The ship's skin illuminates, overlaying a plotted course on

top of the view.

65.

They are moving, very rapidly, on a course that leads directly

between the black hulks of Gargantua and Pantagruel.

CASE:

Roth. Why are we moving?

Roth looks at the stars, then back to his model.

ROTH:

The smaller black hole. We're much

closer to it than the models

predicted. We're being pulled by

its swirl. Very quickly.

The crew looks out through the hull. They are being pulled

into Pantagruel's swirl -- a glittering disc of matter

spinning at high speed around the hole.

Doyle looks behind them. The wormhole mouth is rapidly

growing smaller.

CASE:

Doyle. Fire the engines. Now.

The ship's engines FIRE, straining to fight the irresistible

pull of the supermassive black hole. They won't be able to

fight it for long.

DOYLE:

We're being pulled into it?

ROTH:

No. I don't think so...

Roth looks at the instrumentation for a moment.

ROTH (CONT'D)

It appears to be pulling us on exactly

the trajectory we modelled. If we

try to fight it, we could push

ourselves off of that trajectory.

DOYLE:

You don't know that.

Case stares ahead into the darkness.

ROTH:

We should turn off the engines. Let

the swirl take us.

DOYLE:

(FRANTIC)

Listen to me.

(MORE)

66.

DOYLE (CONT'D)

If the modelling was wrong, then we

can't be sure about anything. We

need to go back.

Case thinks it over. Decides.

CASE:

Shut down the engines.

The engines shut down.

SILENCE. The ship drifts for a moment in the swirl, then

begins to move.

EXT. ENDURANCE

The ship accelerates as it is pulled by the irresistible

force of the black hole onto an inspiraling orbit.

INT. OBSERVATION DECK, ENDURANCE

The crew watch as the ship hurtles around the black hole at

higher and higher speeds.

The sky overhead begins to spin due to their motion -- faster

and faster until it becomes a blur. The ship begins to GROAN

as it appears to be pulled in two different directions.

The ship is now speeding around the black hole at incredible

speed -- one revolution every four seconds. The crew are

suddenly SLAMMED against the hull in opposite directions --

some towards the black hole, some towards the opposite side.

Roth looks at his model, which shows the projected path of

the ship. It looks perilously close to the event horizon.

ROTH:

It's the tidal gravity caused by the

black hole. It means we're right on

the critical orbit.

The comms screen lights up, TONING again and again, as it

receives a long garbled update. Then it shuts down. Cooper

drags himself along the hull until he reaches the controls.

COOPER:

We've lost contact with the relay.

Case joins Cooper at the comms screen.

While they're distracted, Doyle maneuvers himself over to

the engine control.

67.

COOPER (CONT'D)

One long garbled transmission came

in. Then nothing.

Case looks at the screen.

Suddenly, the ship is JOLTED as the engines fire at full

power.

The crew looks over. Doyle is standing by the controls.

DOYLE:

I'm sorry. I can't let you kill us.

We have to go back.

The engines strain to fight the swirl -- but they're

hopelessly outgunned by the gravity of the black hole.

EXT. ENDURANCE

Instead of reversing course, the Endurance begins to speed

up, as it plummets closer and closer to the black hole.

INT. OBSERVATION DECK, ENDURANCE

Doyle's face sinks as he watches the controls -- on the

'volcano' model, the ship is now passing the crest and

spiraling towards destruction. He has made a tragic mistake.

DOYLE:

Why isn't it slowing down?

ROTH:

We're being pulled towards the event

horizon.

ALARMS begin sounding throughout the ship as the projected

course on Roth's model shifts, showing the Endurance being

pushed up the rim, past the critical orbit and down towards

the black hole's event horizon.

Case takes control of the ship, trying to fire the engines

forwards to speed them back up to safety, but it's too late.

CASE:

(CALM)

The engines don't have enough power

to push us back.

ROTH:

They would if we used it all at once.

Cooper is still trying to understand what Roth means as Tars

locks himself into the engine compartment.

68.

COOPER:

What is he doing?

BRAND:

Saving us.

Tars tears open the engine's control panel and begins

overriding it.

EXT. ENDURANCE

Tars rips out the cooling circuitry. Then, holding on tight,

he fires the engine.

INT. OBSERVATION DECK, ENDURANCE

The crew watch as Tars holds the engine, blasting it at full

power into the swirl. The engine heats up white-hot.

ROTH:

Prime the remaining engine. When he

detonates it, we'll only have a few

seconds. If we overshoot we could

be pulled into the bigger hole.

Roth moves to the controls.

CASE:

Secure yourselves. The ship should

be able to withstand the blast.

COOPER:

What about Tars?

As the crew watches, Tars continues to hold the engine even

as the casing around it begins to melt. Finally, it EXPLODES.

EXT. SPACE

Tars is thrown backwards from the explosion, tumbling through

space as the ship is ROCKETED upwards.

INT. ENDURANCE

The ship is SLAMMED by the explosion. Cooper and the rest

of the crew are SMASHED against the hull. Doyle is knocked

unconscious. Brand steps over to him and cradles his head,

trying to protect him.

On Roth's model, the course slowly pushes outward, out of

the danger zone, back to the original delicate orbit.

As they near the original orbit, Case fires the remaining

engine, pushing them back onto the outspiraling orbit.

69.

CASE:

It's going to be close, but we're

going to make it.

Brand looks at the instruments. Points to a tiny radar

contact receding towards the massive black hole.

BRAND:

Tars. His transponder is still

working.

The ship's instruments TONE every few seconds as it

communicates with Tars' onboard computer.

ROTH:

He's being pulled toward Gargantua.

We can't help him.

The crew watch, helpless, as the tones grow further and

further apart. Then they stop.

Cooper looks at Doyle, anger rising. Then he looks down.

EXT. SPACE AROUND PANTAGRUEL

The Endurance slowly spirals back away from Pantagruel, the

sky slowing as the orbit grows longer.

Finally, a tiny speck of light appears in front of the ship.

INT. OBSERVATION DECK, ENDURANCE

Roth watches as the Endurance races back away from the black

hole and into a perfect orbit around a tiny ice planet.

Roth looks up from his screen, smiling.

ROTH:

We're here.

INT. OBSERVATION DECK, ENDURANCE

As Roth and Doyle study the frozen planet below, Cooper tries

in vain to signal the relay on the Earth side of the wormhole.

Brand and Case are having a private conversation away from

everyone else. Cooper walks over.

COOPER:

I still can't contact the relay.

Brand ignores him at first. She nods at Case.

70.

COOPER (CONT'D)

Did you hear me? We're not able to

communicate back home.

She waves him off. But she looks shaken by something.

BRAND:

I've already checked it. It's

electromagnetic interference. We'll

try again in a few hours.

Cooper begins to ask her what's wrong, but she moves off.

Roth looks up from his monitor, excited.

ROTH:

I've got a signal. But it's local.

A familiar CHIRP plays over the ship's speakers.

ROTH (CONT'D)

The remaining probes. We found them.

She looks at the monitor. The probes ping the ship with

their locations, which pop up on the monitor. They're all

clustered in one spot.

COOPER:

How could they all have landed in

the same place?

ROTH:

(SMILES)

Let's go find out.

Case programs a course that will lock the ship in orbit above

the probes on the surface.

EXT. SPACE ABOVE ICE PLANET

The ship settles into orbit a few hundred kilometers above

the surface of the ice planet. It can't get any closer:

The space below it is choked with hundreds of tiny moons --

a cruder version of Saturn's rings. The moons are hurtling

around the planet at high speed.

INT. AIRLOCK, ENDURANCE

Brand ushers Doyle into the landing module. Cooper objects.

COOPER:

We're bringing him along?

71.

BRAND:

We need all the help we can get.

Besides, the alternative is to leave

him on the ship alone. You think

he'll still be here when we get back?

Cooper steps aside, allowing Doyle onboard.

EXT. SPACE ABOVE ICE PLANET

The lander detaches from Endurance, rolls over on its belly,

and FIRES thrusters to sink towards the planet's surface.

INT. LANDER

The crew watches, fascinated, as the ship descends, navigating

between the moons that hurtle past.

The moons are vastly different than our own; potato shaped

and only one to two miles in circumference, they are hugged

in a close embrace with the ice planet, only a few hundred

thousand feet from the surface.

EXT. SURFACE, ICE PLANET -- NIGHT

The lander touches down on the ghostly surface of the planet.

EXT. SURFACE, ICE PLANET -- NIGHT

After a moment, the hatch HISSES open and the team steps

out, led by Case, holding a rifle.

The team sets out, moving slowly in their cumbersome suits.

Lit by the nebula, the surroundings are a little brighter

than a full moon on Earth.

Not that there's much to look at. They are standing on a

sea of ice, which spreads for miles. In the distance, small

rock formations break through the ice.

Brand takes a surface reading of the ice.

BRAND:

(RADIO)

The probe was right. Looks like

significant amounts of oxygen trapped

in the ice.

Case leads the way, drawn by a signal only he can hear. He

walks fifty yards, then stops on a gentle slope that leads

down into a small valley.

72.

CASE:

The other probes should be directly

beneath us.

Case and the others begin digging into the hillside. Cooper

is drawn to a small mound in the middle of the valley, four

feet high. He takes out a small folding shovel and begins

scraping at the ice and snow.

Case hits something solid. But it's not a probe. He digs

around a little more, then reaches up and hacks away at the

hillside, revealing the outline of something metal:

A door. They're not standing at the base of a hill -- it's

a shelter. The crew stands back, unsure what to make of it.

A few feet away, Cooper cuts enough of the mound away to

reveal something flexible -- fabric caked with ice. He

scrapes away the snow, revealing a bright patch of red fabric:

It's the flag of the People's Republic of China.

BRAND:

How could the Chinese have gotten

here first? The federal government

kept the wormhole a secret.

Case shrugs. He has a soldier's gallows humor about his old

employer's ability to keep anything a secret.

CASE:

They didn't do a very good job.

Case reaches for the door of the shelter. It's sealed shut

with ice. He wrenches it open.

INT. CONTROL MODULE, CHINESE BASE CAMP -- NIGHT

Case steps into the shelter, followed by the rest of the

crew. His lights pick up several years worth of dust.

Case steps up to an equipment locker. Forces it open. Inside

are half a dozen black probes. Exposed to light, the probes

begin TONING like the one Cooper found in Texas.

DOYLE:

The Chinese must have captured them.

So they couldn't return to us.

The crew stare at the probes for a moment, taking it in.

BRAND:

Then how did the probe that Cooper

found return?

73.

ROTH:

The more immediate question is what

happened to the Chinese expedition.

There's no sign of their ship in

orbit. And they never returned to

earth.

Roth picks up an ancient vacuum sealed package of pickled

egg. Virtually none of the rations have been eaten.

EXT. VALLEY, ICE PLANET -- NIGHT

Cooper and Brand scrape ice from one of the other small hills

surrounding the valley, revealing another structure. Cooper

forces the door open.

INT. BARRACKS, CHINESE BASE CAMP, ICE PLANET -- NIGHT

Cooper and Brand let themselves in. The shelter is well

stocked with food and equipment.

Brand is taking readings with a radiation detector.

BRAND:

The whole place has been dosed with

huge levels of radiation. What

happened here?

Cooper looks at the pieces of a modular, one-person rocket,

a last-ditch means of escape, stored, untouched in the

shelter. He steps back, realizing something.

COOPER:

This is the Taichung mission.

BRAND:

The Mars mission? The Chinese claimed

it had been destroyed on landing.

Cooper looks over the relay log.

COOPER:

They never landed. Not on Mars.

Four human crew, fifteen robots.

The log says the base has been here

for thirty years.

Case's familiar voice comes through the radio.

CASE (O.S.)

I've found something.

74.

INT. UTILITY MODULE, CHINESE BASE CAMP -- NIGHT

The structure is filled with drilling equipment. Cooper and

the rest of the team stand at the edge of a three-foot hole

that has been drilled into the ice.

A descending rig is anchored to the top of the hole. Doyle

and Case struggle to pull themselves out of the hole.

DOYLE:

It goes down for a hundred and fifty

feet, then stops. Tunnel's old --

the ice has reformed at the bottom.

BRAND:

I'm going to descend to take some

samples. Cooper, want to make

yourself useful?

Cooper begins to say something, then bites his tongue.

EXT. LANDER -- NIGHT

Cooper emerges, loaded down with several containers of Brand's

equipment.

As he struggles through the wind and snow, his radio picks

up data chatter between the mother ship and Case. The comms

are just noise. After a moment, Case's voice cuts in.

CASE (O.S.)

Get back here, Cooper. We've got a

problem.

Cooper continues to wade through the snow. Suddenly, he

trips over something, dropping the equipment.

Cooper looks back. He tripped on a white plastic post

sticking out of the snow. He dusts it off, to reveal a

picture of a Chinese Taikonaut smiling in his flight suit.

This is a grave marker.

Cooper sweeps his hand through the snow, revealing three

more white posts with pictures. The entire human crew has

been buried here.

INT. UTILITY MODULE, CHINESE BASE CAMP -- NIGHT

Roth and Case are looking at a portable monitor, showing a

projection of the nearby system -- the ice planet is a speck

orbiting the local black hole.

COOPER:

The entire human crew is buried out

there in the snow.

75.

Roth looks up from the monitor and assesses the situation

with his usual detachment.

ROTH:

I think I know what killed them.

This planet isn't the only thing

orbiting this black hole.

Roth zooms the monitor in, revealing a tiny, impossibly-bright

object appearing at the horizon of the black hole.

ROTH (CONT'D)

It's a neutron star. The black hole

shields the planet's surface from it

for twenty hours at a stretch. Time's

about up.

Even Brand looks rattled.

BRAND:

How long do we have left?

ROTH:

About five minutes.

COOPER:

Then what?

BRAND:

Then we die. The radiation will

cook us alive.

Cooper looks around, their predicament settling in. Case

walks over to the edge of the mine shaft.

CASE:

We have to go down.

COOPER:

What about returning to the ship?

BRAND:

Not enough time. Case is right.

The ice can shield us from some of

the x-rays.

DOYLE:

It would take a thousand feet of ice

to shield us.

Brand gives up on the argument, sheds her equipment and clips

herself to the line to follow Case down into the ice.

Cooper looks at Doyle, then follows her.

76.

INT. ICE MINE SHAFT -- NIGHT

Cooper descends into the shaft. The only light is from his

suit's light array.

He reaches the bottom of the shaft, which opens into a small

cave, the ice ribbed in wave-like patterns like the seafloor.

COOPER:

What is this?

BRAND:

A pocket formed by gas. There may

be more below.

The ice below them reveals nothing but murky blackness.

Case has found some of the equipment left behind by the

Chinese -- a battery-powered drill and a pick.

DOYLE:

We'll never make it far enough down.

BRAND:

Shut up. How much time do we have,

Roth?

Roth checks his watch with his usual detachment.

ROTH:

About three minutes or so until we're

fully exposed.

The rad meter Brand is holding begins to CHIRP with activity --

the radiation levels are rising. The ice will not be enough

to protect them.

Cooper sees that Brand has exhausted herself with the pick.

He takes over for her.

The drill that Case is operating GROANS as the thirty-year-

old battery runs out of charge. Case casts it aside and

begins SMASHING at the ice with his bare hand.

Brand is looking at the walls of the ice pocket, looking for

fissures. Her lights pick out something in the ice. She

LOOKS CLOSER:

Tiny black flecks. Brand, ever the scientist, forgets their

predicament and begins chipping at the ice.

BRAND:

I've found something.

Case continues to pummel the ice with his hand, which is

badly smashed.

77.

He pulls off the hand and continues to hack away at the ice

with the stump, trying to save his crew.

Brand is examining a piece of ice in her hands, which contains

several black flecks. As she shines her light on them, they

FLUORESCE, giving off a tiny flicker of light, like a firefly.

Brand steps back.

BRAND (CONT'D)

These things... they're alive.

Roth joins her, looking down at the tiny creatures trapped

in the ice. Brand shines her flashlight over the ice again,

but nothing happens. Roth takes the depth meter dangling by

a lanyard from Brand's suit.

ROTH:

It's not your light they're responding

to. It's this--

Roth takes the depth meter and waves it over the ice.

Suddenly, the black flecks begin to shine.

BRAND:

X-rays. They feed on them and emit

visible light. They've found a way

to survive here.

Roth looks at the shimmering light of the tiny life-forms

trapped in the ice, mesmerized.

Case hammers down with his arm, gouging a deep hole in the

ice below. Suddenly, GAS sprays back up at him. He's found

the gas pocket beneath them.

Too late. Roth's rad meter begins BEEPING frantically.

EXT. ICE PLANET -- ALIEN DAWN

Overhead, a tiny ball is orbiting into view from the dark

side of the black hole -- the NEUTRON STAR.

Its humble size belies its power. As its rays hit the ice,

the ice CRACKLES with energy.

INT. ICE MINE SHAFT -- ALIEN DAWN

Brand steps back from the ice in awe as it begins to glow.

The microbes are absorbing the x-rays and emitting light.

Within seconds, they are bathed in an incredible glow.

Even Cooper stops, awed by the beauty of the display. Only

Case is unmoved, continuing to SMASH at the ice with the

broken end of his wrist.

78.

BRAND:

(looks at rad meter)

They're absorbing most of the x-rays.

ROTH:

Not enough, unfortunately.

Suddenly, a CRACK as Case punches into the ice. Cooper looks

down -- a great fissure has opened in the ice beneath them.

COOPER:

Case, wait--

Case PUNCHES again. Suddenly, with a great BANG, the ice

floor disintegrates beneath them.

They fall into the darkness.

INT. CAVERN -- ALIEN DAWN

Cooper falls. For a moment, the only light he can see is

from Case, falling calmly a few yards beneath him.

As they fall, the light from the microbes trapped in the ice

above sweeps across the inside of the cavern, illuminating

the floor of the massive cavern thousands of feet down.

The rock formations they saw on the surface are actually the

tip of a mountain range extending into the distance,

disappearing into the ice above as if it were cloud cover.

The base of the mountains is covered in a thick jungle-like

foliage that runs into a perfectly-still inland sea. On the

far side of the sea, another mountain range stretches into

the distance, supporting the thick ice and rock cavern roof.

Cooper only has a few seconds to take this in -- he is falling

towards the huge inland sea below.

Seconds before impact, a tiny warning light flickers on inside

his helmet:
IMPACT DETECTED.

Suddenly, a small drag chute EXPLODES from a panel on the

back of suit, slowing his fall. Airbags EXPLODE on his legs

and torso to cushion the impact.

Cooper SMASHES into the water.

BLACKNESS.

EXT. UNDERWATER -- DAY

Cooper comes to underwater, as liquid is flowing into his

suit from his shattered helmet.

79.

Bubbles pour out from his suit and Cooper GASPS as his helmet

fills with water and he begins to sink.

As he sinks, Cooper pulls off his helmet, then tears off

pieces of his suit. He forces himself through the neck of

the suit and then swims upward.

He is about to surface when he remembers where he is. He

hesitates, just beneath the surface, lungs tightening as he

runs out of oxygen.

EXT. SEA, ICE PLANET -- DAY

Cooper breaks the surface, COUGHS out water, and takes a

panicked breath.

He waits. Nothing happens. He opens his mouth again and

breathes in almost pure oxygen. He can breathe.

Treading water, he looks around. Spots lights in the water

below nearby -- Brand, in her suit, is sinking.

He dives down and struggles to haul her up by the suit.

Cooper breaks the surface, looks at Brand. Her mask is also

broken.

COOPER:

Breathe. Trust me.

She refuses at first. Water is bubbling into her suit through

the open mask. Finally, she takes a deep breath.

COOPER (CONT'D)

Your suit is filling with water.

I'm not going to be able to hold it

much longer. I'm going to let go.

Brand's eyes widen.

BRAND:

What do you mean, you're going to

let go?

COOPER:

Take a deep breath.

Brand takes a deep breath and Cooper lets go of her.

EXT. UNDERWATER -- DAY

Brand sinks. Cooper swims down, following her, ripping away

at her suit. The tear-away seals on her suit are stuck fast,

damaged in the fall.

80.

Cooper finally breaks them off. Brand pulls herself out,

free, and they swim for the surface.

EXT. SHORE, ICE PLANET -- DAY

Cooper drags himself out of the water and onto the beach.

He turns back to offer Brand a hand. She waves him off.

BRAND:

I don't need your help.

COOPER:

I thought we were supposed to be a

collective organism.

She gives up and lets him help her out of the water.

They sit together, soaking wet, trying to catch their breath.

BRAND:

Thank you.

COOPER:

Don't mention it.

Cooper feels the rocks beneath him, which are translucent,

like glass, and polished to an impossible shine.

He looks up to see Case dragging Roth and Doyle, still in

their suits, out of the water.

EXT. SHORE, ICE PLANET -- DAY

Doyle and Roth have stripped down from their suits and are

breathing in the pure oxygen atmosphere.

Case and Cooper are pulling modular pieces from their

equipment packs to form a small shelter.

Brand is taking readings with her instruments.

BRAND:

Oxygen atmosphere. Pure water.

Temperate climate.

(TO COOPER)

You still think this is a coincidence?

Cooper looks at the tree line, less convinced.

COOPER:

Looks like we can climb up the

mountains back to the ice. We're

down to three suits. We'll have to

send someone ahead to get a fourth.

81.

BRAND:

I won't need one.

DOYLE:

Why not?

BRAND:

Because I'm not going anywhere.

This is our new home.

Brand picks up some of her instruments and a sample case and

hikes into the jungle.

EXT. SHORE, ICE PLANET -- DAY

Cooper finishes constructing the modest shelter. They load

the suits and the rest of their gear inside.

COOPER:

Any sign of Brand?

ROTH:

She's still taking samples. If you

find her, tell her to head back.

Night should be falling soon.

COOPER:

What happens then?

ROTH:

Your guess is as good as mine.

Cooper hikes into the jungle to look for Brand.

EXT. JUNGLE, ICE PLANET -- DAY

Cooper finds Brand taking samples from the tree-like life-

forms, which are wildly different from their counterparts

back on Earth, piled in torturous coils, as if frozen in a

struggle to punch through the canopy to reach the light above.

BRAND:

This is incredible. The organisms

trapped in the ice above absorb x-

rays and emit light. In return,

these plants absorb the light and

emit oxygen, which feeds the animals

trapped in the ice.

Brand cuts off a sample and drops it into the case. The

transparent wall of the case magnifies the structure onto

the glass automatically. She compares it with the flecks

she collected in the ice above, fascinated.

82.

BRAND (CONT'D)

Look at this. I think they're the

same organism at a different stage

of the life cycle.

(shows him the sample)

It's fractal. No individual cells --

the structure repeats all the way

down.

Cooper looks at the sample, then continues scanning the jungle

around them, nervous.

COOPER:

Any sign of big life-forms?

BRAND:

The soil's been disturbed. So

something's been moving. But I

haven't seen anything.

(notices his look)

Cooper... are you nervous?

Cooper stops scanning the trees, embarrassed.

COOPER:

I just think we should get back to

the shelter before night falls.

Overhead, the light from the ice above begins to fade -- the

neutron star must have orbited out of view. Night is falling.

BRAND:

(LAUGHING)

Relax. If there are any large

organisms here, even predatory ones,

they're not going to attack us --

they have no idea what we are.

COOPER:

You don't know that. You just have

blind faith this place is going to

be some kind of Eden.

Brand stops. He's struck a nerve.

BRAND:

(truly pissed off)

Faith has nothing to do with it.

You know what you are, Cooper? You're

just another in a long line of people

saying 'no.' That this isn't going

to work. And frankly, I don't have

to convince you.

83.

COOPER:

What's that supposed to mean?

BRAND:

You're on this mission because you're

another pair of hands. You want the

truth? I told Case we should bring

another robot over you. At least

then I could just reprogram you to-

She stops. Something has caught her attention.

COOPER:

What?

BRAND:

Nothing. I just -- I could have

sworn it just moved.

She walks to the thick, knotted trunk of a tree. Puts a

hand on it.

Overhead, the ice flickers out and the darkness begins to

descend, more rapidly than on Earth.

Suddenly, the tree SHUDDERS. Then, the bark begins to ooze

over Brand's fingers.

Brand snaps her hand away and steps back. Even for her,

this is too much. She turns back to Cooper, who is looking

at the jungle around them, spooked.

COOPER:

You know how plants don't usually

move? Is that a universal rule?

BRAND:

No. There really aren't any rules.

All around them, the life-forms begins to melt toward the

ground, breaking down into different, smaller forms.

BRAND (CONT'D)

(trying to stay calm)

Remember, we're the aliens.

Cooper steps back as several pieces of the nearest tree drop

onto the ground and begin scuttling toward him.

BRAND (CONT'D)

Hold very still. Don't make any

sudden movements.

Two of the pieces join together, stacking themselves up and

staggering toward him.

84.

A third piece climbs onto the first two, looking for a good

place to hang on. After a moment it hunkers down on top,

forming a crude head. Thirty eye-like structures blink open

on the creature.

The skin of the life-form begins to flicker with a dim light

like the animals trapped in the ice above, bathing Cooper

and Brand in a warm glow.

The creature creeps closer to them, taking them in. Cooper

tries his best to seem non-threatening.

COOPER:

Hello there.

The creature lurches toward him on three legs, then its head

splits open and it BELLOWS.

COOPER (CONT'D)

OK. Now we run.

Brand doesn't argue. They turn and sprint through the trees.

EXT. JUNGLE -- NIGHT

Cooper and Brand smash headlong through the jungle. At first,

they're running from the rumbling, smashing melee behind

them. But as they run, the entire jungle around them begins

to break apart and move.

After a moment, they're surrounded. The jungle is completely

disassembling itself into a million different pieces, each

one a different size and shape than the others.

COOPER:

We have to reach the shelter.

They head off, crashing through the melee.

EXT. SHORE, ICE PLANET -- NIGHT

Case, Doyle and Roth are standing in front of the shelter

finishing the day's work.

Doyle turns around. The jungle is breaking apart and crawling

down the beach towards them.

DOYLE:

I think we've got a problem.

Case and Roth look up to see the organisms picking up speed

as they move towards them.

Roth begins to step out towards them.

85.

ROTH:

Fascinating. I think-

Case grabs him by the arm and pushes him bodily into the

shelter after Doyle.

Case pushes the door closed.

INT. SHELTER, ICE PLANET -- NIGHT

They crouch inside the shelter as the organisms begin POUNDING

at the walls, trying to force their way inside.

It's going to be a long night.

EXT. JUNGLE, ICE PLANET -- NIGHT

Ahead, Cooper can see the gleaming water of the inland sea,

light still flickering in patches from the ice above it.

COOPER:

This way.

Brand begins to follow.

BRAND:

No... wait.

Too late. Cooper forces his way between two writhing

creatures, steps through, and falls...

EXT. WATERFALL -- NIGHT

Cooper gasps as he surfaces from the ice-cold water. Brand

floats past.

The river appears to flow randomly down the slope, with good

reason -- the forest rearranges itself every night.

Ahead, the ground drops away again and the water rushes over

it in a torrent.

Cooper catches himself at the last minute, grabbing a thick

tree branch with one hand and, a second later, Brand with

the other as she slides past.

COOPER:

I've got you.

Suddenly, the branch in Cooper's hand illuminates and wrenches

itself out of the rock -- it's a limb of a huge colony

organism. It shakes Cooper loose and they fall again...

86.

EXT. POOL -- NIGHT

Brand surfaces first. She grabs Cooper and hauls him up and

out of the water. She smiles down at him, a little smug.

BRAND:

I've got you.

Creatures begin splashing down into the pool behind them, as

if imitating them.

Cooper stumbles to his feet and Brand guides them backward

into a small cave carved into the rock above the pool.

INT. CAVE -- NIGHT

Brand CRACKS a glow stick, basking the cave around them in a

soft light.

As they watch, horrified, the pool and the rocks in front of

the cave fill up with creatures of all sizes, as they tumble

down the hill in what appears to be a battle royal.

For a moment, it looks like Brand and Cooper may go unnoticed.

Then, a three-foot-tall creature with a dozen legs creeps

its way toward the entrance to the cave. Another follows,

and another, until the cave entrance is full.

Cooper looks around the cave, frantic. He picks up a rock.

Brand, scared but still thinking, takes the rock from his

hand and drops it back to the ground.

BRAND:

It's game theory. The best move is

always to cooperate at first.

COOPER:

By "cooperate" do you mean let it

eat me?

BRAND:

These organisms have no interest in

us. They survive by photosynthesis.

All they need is light.

COOPER:

Then why are they killing each other?

BRAND:

I don't know.

(LOOKS AROUND)

But we're outnumbered, Cooper. So

unless you have a better idea, I

suggest we make nice.

87.

The creatures move toward them hesitantly, then faster.

Cooper stands stock still as the creatures gather around

him. Several of them join up into bigger animals to get a

better look at him.

One of them wraps itself around his chest and begins prodding

at his shoulders, then his neck.

COOPER:

(trying to be calm)

What is it doing?

BRAND:

It's a colony organism. It's trying

to incorporate you into its structure.

COOPER:

I don't want it to incorporate me.

BRAND:

Don't open your mouth.

COOPER:

WHY N-

As he speaks, the creature on his chest extends four spindly,

pointed feelers and reaches gently into his mouth.

Cooper holds his breath as the organism taps against his

teeth. Its skin has a roughened texture, as if incomplete,

and it appears to be searching for the same texture on

Cooper's skin, without much luck.

Bored, the life-forms climb back down off of Cooper. The

last two creatures link up in an imitation of Cooper's lower

body and attempt to walk across the room like a human. After

a moment, the creatures tumble to the ground and flail away.

Cooper is still breathing hard as the cave empties and he

and Brand are left alone again.

Brand steps to the edge of the cave and watches, fascinated,

as the creatures resume wrestling and battling each other.

COOPER (CONT'D)

They're killing each other.

BRAND:

No. They don't bleed... they don't

die... they're just competing...

trying out different shapes, looking

for the best one.

88.

Cooper watches as a hideously-awkward-looking, five-legged

beast stumbles past and tackles another animal.

COOPER:

I'd say they have a long way to go.

BRAND:

(AMAZED)

They do this every night.

As they watch, a two-foot-long creature with one huge claw

scuttles along the ground, grabbing smaller opponents and

smashing them apart, then sorting through the wreckage and

adopting some of the writhing parts as its own.

Something about the movement is endearing, the way it

experiments with each piece -- less like a massacre and more

like an over-caffeinated self-assembling erector set.

Suddenly, a massive, lumbering creature SMASHES down in front

of the claw beast. No match, the smaller creature turns to

scuttle away. Too slow. The larger organism brings one

club-like limb smashing down on top of it. After a moment,

it lifts its claw -- the two animals have become one.

The new organism lumbers away through the jungle, happily

snapping its new claw at larger opponents.

BRAND (CONT'D)

The behavior changes as the animals

get bigger and bigger. More

sophisticated. More calculated.

Two of the larger organisms square off, circling each other,

lights pulsing up and down their bodies in a fierce display.

COOPER:

But what are they competing for?

BRAND:

I don't know.

Brand shivers -- it's getting colder.

INT. CAVE -- NIGHT

Brand and Cooper huddle around a small chemical fire they've

brought with them.

Brand looks at the sample of the fractal wildlife in her

case. It's moving around, splitting apart, reforming, trying

to find a way out.

89.

BRAND:

These creatures are billions of years

older than we are. But they're

relatively primitive. They haven't

developed tools, culture, language.

COOPER:

Why not?

BRAND:

I don't know. No one knows how

intelligent life began on Earth.

But the surface of this planet has

virtually no craters. No impacts.

It's been sheltered by the local

black holes.

COOPER:

What difference would that make?

BRAND:

Maybe not enough has gone wrong here.

Maybe bad luck is the key to

intelligent life.

COOPER:

(QUIETLY)

Murph's Law.

BRAND:

Exactly. Maybe our interaction with

them will push them over the top.

Maybe that's part of the plan.

COOPER:

(shakes his head)

The plan.

BRAND:

Why is it so hard for you to accept

that someone might be trying to help

us?

Cooper is silent for a moment. His mood darkens.

COOPER:

I was in Denver during the first

year of the famine. I was just a

kid. We kept waiting for someone to

come help us. People starved to

death sitting on the ground, waiting

for someone to come.

(MORE)

90.

COOPER (CONT'D)

(looks at her)

I only made it because I realized

that nobody was coming to save us.

We were on our own.

Cooper looks away. The memories are never that far away.

COOPER (CONT'D)

Honestly? After the things I saw...

you want to know why I don't believe

that someone would be trying to help

us? Because I'm not sure we're worth

saving.

They sit in silence for a while.

EXT. CAVE -- NIGHT

Cooper sleeps. After a moment, Brand steps back out into

the darkness.

EXT. PLAIN -- DAWN

Brand exhales great streams of frosted breath -- the

temperature is well below freezing. The first flickers of

light are visible in the ice above.

The creatures are huge now, forty or fifty feet tall, battling

each other more and more slowly. As Brand watches, the

largest of them beats down his rivals, climbing to the top

of the heap.

Just as the beast reaches the top, it freezes, as if stuck.

Above, the ice begins to shine brighter and brighter.

Suddenly, the beast on top breaks apart, unfurling into planes

to catch the light. This is what the contest has been about --

a better place in the sun.

Brand takes it in.

EXT. JUNGLE -- DAY

Cooper and Brand pick their way their way through the foliage,

which is now perfectly still, absorbing the light. Cooper

looks at the plants, wary.

Brand sees his trepidation and laughs at him.

BRAND:

They're not going to move now, Cooper.

They need to spread themselves as

thin as they can to absorb the light.

91.

Cooper leads the way, pushing through the trees.

Suddenly he stops again. Brand, annoyed, pushes through the

foliage to join him.

BRAND (CONT'D)

Cooper, honestly, you're a bit of a-

She stops. Cooper is standing at a sheer cliff.

Spread out on the plain below is a massive, fortified base.

INT. CHINESE FORTIFIED COLONY -- DAY

Massive blast doors, long since smashed in, open onto a

building that has been overrun by the local fractal wildlife.

Case steps inside first, his worklights flickering on. Cooper

and the others follow him in.

INT. MESS HALL, CHINESE COLONY -- DAY

The room is barely recognizable -- the fractal life has

covered the tables and chairs. Water pools on the floor and

light streams in from a massive hole the fractal animals

have punched in the ceiling.

DOYLE:

Looks like the Chinese picked a fight

with the locals.

COOPER:

Looks like they lost.

They continue through the ruins.

INT. BARRACKS, CHINESE COLONY -- DAY

The deeper they go, the less fractal wildlife they find.

The barracks are pristine -- hundreds of perfectly made beds,

waiting for colonists who never came, like one of the bunkers

the federal government used to keep in case of nuclear winter.

DOYLE:

Look at the size of this place.

They built it for thousands of people.

But no one came.

Brand looks around, determined.

BRAND:

They will. We can salvage it. This

place will save us years.

92.

COOPER:

But why didn't they come?

BRAND:

(SHRUGS)

The Chinese government collapsed,

same as ours. The people who knew

about this mission probably died

years ago. We had the same problems.

Roth finds a sign he likes the look of -- it points to the

science levels.

INT. LABORATORY, CHINESE COLONY -- DAY

A massive door GRINDS open and the team steps into a massive

complex of underground laboratories.

INT. DAMAGED LAB, CHINESE COLONY -- DAY

Cooper and the others carefully make their way through a lab

that has been completely emptied -- no desks, no chairs,

nothing. The only thing that remains is a solid ball of

matter in the center of the room.

BRAND:

What happened here?

Roth stares at the ball, intrigued.

ROTH:

They were testing something.

Cooper looks at the walls, which are bowed inwards.

COOPER:

Testing what?

Roth is looking at the ball, which appears to have been built

from layers of different material. The outermost layer is

flattened steel.

COOPER (CONT'D)

(LOOKING CLOSER)

Is that a chair?

Roth looks. The outermost layer of the ball indeed looks

like a steel chair, flattened with incredible force onto

surface of the ball.

Brand opens the door to the next lab.

93.

INT. LABORATORY, CHINESE COLONY -- NIGHT

The lab is empty, except for a large metal sphere on a

pedestal in the center of the room. A black box is set into

a cavity in the sphere, wired to a control panel.

Cooper looks at the walls of the room, which have been bowed

inwards, as if some great force had been pulling from the

center of the room.

COOPER:

Everything in here is bolted down.

(looks at sphere)

What do you think this thing does?

ROTH:

(EXCITED)

Let's find out.

Roth finds a control panel. Wipes off an inch of dust and

begins tinkering with the controls.

COOPER:

I wouldn't turn it on until we can

figure out what it does, Roth.

Roth continues to look over the controls, oblivious.

BRAND (O.S.)

Cooper. Come look at this.

Brand calls out from the hallway.

INT. STAIRWELL, CHINESE COLONY -- DAY

Cooper follows Brand's voice down the stairs to a sub-basement

beneath the lab level.

INT. OBSERVATORY, CHINESE COLONY -- DAY

Cooper steps into a huge space filled with a near perfect

holographic representation of the local system.

Cooper joins Brand and Doyle in the map, looking at the

incredibly detailed models of each star.

Case is standing at a terminal, hacking into the camp's

records.

CASE:

I've found the Chinese mission logs.

They're encrypted.

Cooper walks over. Looks over the terminal.

94.

COOPER:

Old military-grade encryption. It's

not very robust.

(looks at Case)

No offense. Hang on.

Cooper punches a few keys into the terminal. Opens up the

terminal. Scans the motherboard. Takes Case's rifle and

SMASHES one of the chips on the board.

The terminal comes to life. Cooper hands Case his rifle.

COOPER (CONT'D)

That should open up most of it.

Case is silent for a beat, parsing the information.

CASE:

They got here twenty years ago. The

human crew was killed by radiation

the first day. But the robots

survived. They built the colony and

radioed home. But they didn't receive

a response.

COOPER:

No one was listening.

CASE:

(SCANS DOCUMENT)

After a few years they discovered a

problem.

DOYLE:

What problem?

CASE:

It doesn't say. Their science team

took the ship to continue exploring

the system. It says they found some

kind of...

(TRANSLATING)

...The word literally means

'treasure.'

Case skims through the rest of the logs, large portions of

which have been redacted.

CASE (CONT'D)

The science team returned after five

years with a new technology. They

began the experiments upstairs, then

they left again and never returned.

95.

BRAND:

Where did they go?

CASE:

I don't know. They've deleted their

mission plan. There's nothing else.

DOYLE:

I think I know what the problem is.

Doyle is manipulating the time component of the map, slowing

down the passage of time, reversing it, speeding it up.

DOYLE (CONT'D)

Look.

Doyle speeds up the map until the ice planet is nearly a

blur, speeding in its orbit around Pantagruel.

DOYLE (CONT'D)

There's a small black hole moving

into the system. Too small for us

to have seen in our survey. It's

not going to hit the planet, but

it's going to come close.

A tiny black hole soars through the system. Although it

misses the ice planet, it deflects its orbit by a tiny degree.

After a dozen more orbits, the ice planet dips down close to

Pantagruel's event horizon and is torn apart.

Brand and the others watch as the sequence rewinds and repeats --

the planet is pieced back together again and ejected, then

pulled back in and torn apart. Over and over.

DOYLE (CONT'D)

This place isn't paradise. It's

doomed. Just like us.

The crew stand, watching the sequence in stunned silence.

COOPER:

How long does this place have?

CASE:

A few years. A decade at most.

Doyle turns to Brand.

DOYLE:

So much for the plan.

Cooper looks at Brand. She is in disbelief, staring as a

lifetime's training and optimism are torn to pieces.

96.

BRAND:

But I don't understand... why are we

here? What are we here for?

Cooper looks down. Brand's upset is turning to anger.

BRAND (CONT'D)

What the hell are we here for? I

trained my whole life to reach this

place.

She looks at Cooper, questioning.

COOPER:

(GENTLE)

Maybe... maybe Roth's right... maybe

we just don't understand it yet.

She looks down. She knows he doesn't believe what he's

saying. He's been right all along -- they're alone.

For a tiny moment, all hope is lost.

Suddenly, with a distant RUMBLE, the building begins SHAKING.

COOPER (CONT'D)

Case, what is that?

CASE:

It's nighttime. The native life-

forms are mobile again.

The RUMBLE grows more intense, as if the entire building is

being gently shaken.

COOPER:

No. It's closer than that.

(REALIZING)

Roth.

The RUMBLE grows. As Cooper watches, Case's rifle slides

free of the desk. But instead of falling, it simply hangs

in the air.

Then he realizes the same thing is happening to them -- his

boots no longer have traction with the ground. After a second

everything in the room is floating an inch off of the ground.

COOPER (CONT'D)

Quick -- hold onto something.

He reaches out to Brand but it's too late -- suddenly they're

no longer floating, they're falling.

They're falling up.

97.

Cooper, Brand and the rest of them hit the ceiling. Cooper

picks himself up and adjusts to his surroundings -- up is

now down. He helps Brand up.

DOYLE:

What the hell is happening?

Case doesn't answer -- he's looking up at the control

equipment for the holographic display, which is GROANING

under a load it was never built to handle.

Case grabs Cooper and Brand and pushes them towards the

stairwell as the control panel TEARS free of the floor and

CRASHES towards them.

Cooper falls into the stairwell -- now they're being pulled

up and sideways through the stairwell, like an Escher

painting.

Brand pushes Cooper out of the way as debris from the control

panel orbits past them back up towards the lab.

They try to hang on but the force is becoming irresistible,

dragging them along the wall of the stairwell and back towards

the lab upstairs.

Brand wedges herself against the railing as objects and debris

are SMASHING against the door to the lab.

Doyle is trying to hang onto the handrail but his grip slips

and he CRIES OUT as he falls towards the door to the lab,

SMASHING it open. Doyle disappears up and into the lab.

Cooper slips trying to help Doyle. Brand reaches out for

him...

Too late. Cooper is pulled through the open door.

INT. INTACT LAB, CHINESE COLONY -- NIGHT

Cooper is pulled through the door and past the control panel.

He reaches out and grabs the underside of the panel.

He dangles, the panel cutting into the meat of his hand,

trying to get his bearings:

Roth, Doyle, and everything that hasn't been bolted down is

either pressed against the sphere in the center of the room

or is orbiting around it.

Roth, who is laughing, jubilant, shouts up to him:

ROTH:

The control panel is beneath you.

See if you can turn it off.

98.

Cooper slips as he tries to reach the controls. Finally he

finds the controls for the machine.

COOPER:

(YELLS UP)

I found it. Hold onto something.

Roth and Doyle crawl up the side of the mass and hold onto

the support wires.

Cooper hits a key on the monitor.

Suddenly, the room inverts again, reverting to a normal

gravitational field. Cooper floats for a second, then topples

back to the ground, along with everything else.

Brand stumbles in to find Cooper sprawled on the floor as

Roth and Doyle hang onto the sphere for dear life.

INT. INTACT LAB, CHINESE COLONY -- NIGHT

Roth, back on terra firma, is looking at the tiny black box

he's pried from the center of the sphere. Cooper is looking

over his shoulder.

COOPER:

They found a way to make gravity.

ROTH:

Not make it. Adjust it. Dial it

up, or down. I think they were

experimenting with it -- firing these

into the black hole to try to save

this planet.

DOYLE:

All that from one tiny box.

Roth has hooked the box up to a terminal and it scrolling

through the incredibly sophisticated machine code, trying to

parse how it works. Cooper looks on.

ROTH:

(AMAZED)

It barely uses any power. I'm only

beginning to understand what it does

but I think it sends a signal out

into the bulk. It must tap into the

same technologies that were used to

create the wormholes in the first

place.

COOPER:

What does that mean?

99.

ROTH:

It means whoever built the wormhole

probably doesn't exist inside our

universe.

Cooper looks at the tiny box.

COOPER:

But how did the Chinese develop the

technology? This would take decades,

maybe hundreds of years, to create.

CASE:

Wherever they went, they found

something that allowed them to build

it.

Brand looks at the box.

ROTH:

They came back here and tried to use

these devices to save this planet.

But they didn't work. Nothing would

be strong enough to weaken a black

hole.

BRAND:

Maybe we could work with it. Try to

improve it.

ROTH:

No. You're missing the bigger

picture. The robots had strict

mission parameters. They were told

to build a colony and report back.

They tried to. But they failed.

Like us they were fixated on this

place.

Cooper looks at Brand.

ROTH (CONT'D)

They didn't realize they had already

found something that would save us

all.

(holds up the box)

This. This is the prize.

He holds up the box.

ROTH (CONT'D)

Don't you see? Earth's gravity is

like a prison. But this is like a

master key.

(MORE)

100.

ROTH (CONT'D)

If we could build more of these, we

could turn down the earth's

gravitational field enough to save

millions of people. We wouldn't

have to pick a handful of people to

survive. With this we can save

everyone.

BRAND:

And go where?

ROTH:

Wherever we want. We don't belong

in any one place. Can't you see

that now? Not Earth. Not this place.

Nowhere. If the human race is going

to survive, we need to keep moving.

Split up. Spread out. Fly. With

this, we can.

Case looks at the box. Makes a decision.

CASE:

In the morning we're taking this and

going home.

Doyle, Roth and Case set about making preparations to leave --

gathering space suits, equipment.

In the bustle, Cooper finds Brand sitting alone, staring at

the sample of fractal life.

COOPER:

I know this isn't exactly what you

trained for. But I think Roth might

be right.

BRAND:

That doesn't help this planet. This

creature is doomed. Unlike us it

doesn't have anywhere to go.

The fractal organism almost seems to be looking at her, trying

to comprehend. But it quickly loses interest and goes back

to breaking itself into pieces and reforming into different

shapes, trying to escape. Brand sets it back down.

CUT TO:

INT. BARRACKS, CHINESE COLONY -- DAY

Morning. Cooper and the others prepare to head out. They

are laden down with gear -- space suits for the return trip

to the lander once they reach the surface.

101.

Roth carries the gravitational prototype.

EXT. ENTRANCE, CHINESE FORTIFIED COLONY -- DAY

They make their way through the ruined entrance.

CASE:

We need to hurry. We only have a

few hours to reach the ice before

nightfall.

Cooper stops. He puts a hand on Brand's shoulder. He points

to the tree line. Something is moving.

COOPER:

Don't make any sudden movements.

They can't hurt us if we're unarmed.

BRAND:

Who?

Suddenly, three ROBOT MARINES step out of the jungle, weapons

raised. They are wearing ghillie suits, pieced together

from dried dead pieces of the local foliage.

Under their camouflage, they looks identical to Case. With

one key difference -- faded red and gold insignias.

Case steps protectively in front of his team.

The CHINESE OFFICER steps forward, rifle levelled.

CHINESE OFFICER:

Ni Hao. My name is Technical Sergeant

Liu, 177th reconnaissance Marines,

Army of the People's Republic.

Welcome to New China.

(POLITE)

Please put down your weapon.

Sergeant Liu speaks in the same even tones as Case -- they

were probably built in the same factory before the war.

Case keeps his rifle raised.

CASE:

This is a scientific expedition, not

a military one. We are making our

way back to our ship.

LIU:

I'm afraid I cannot let you do that.

We will provide food and shelter and

await further instructions.

(MORE)

102.

LIU (CONT'D)

We are sorry if this causes you any

inconvenience.

The sergeant is polite, but firm.

BRAND:

This planet is being pulled into the

black hole. We all need to leave.

LIU:

We will await further orders.

COOPER:

Further orders aren't coming. Your

government is gone. It ran out of

money, same as ours. You're on your

own.

LIU:

We can offer you food and shelter as

long as you require. The facilities

here are quite comfortable.

Liu's tone remains polite, but there's no hope of changing

his mind. Cooper takes a sidelong glance at Brand.

COOPER:

(LOW)

They're never going to let us go.

BRAND:

(TO LIU)

Your mission is a humanitarian one,

wasn't it? You were sent to start a

colony. Like us.

LIU:

Our mission was to prepare for the

evacuation. This site was deemed

unacceptable.

BRAND:

This device that you have built --

this could save millions of people.

We need to get it back home.

Brand points to the device Roth is holding. The Chinese

robots seem particularly unhappy with this development.

LIU:

These technologies are the property

of the People's Republic.

(MORE)

103.

LIU (CONT'D)

We have been ordered to prevent anyone

from taking them. We have been

ordered to prevent anyone from

following.

ROTH:

Following? Following where?

Liu pauses.

LIU:

We will await further orders.

ROTH:

Your name means six. Where did the

others go? One through five? Is

that who were not supposed to follow.

Case turns to look at Cooper.

CASE:

(LOW)

Take the others up to the lander.

Keep going. No matter what happens,

don't come back for me.

Cooper nods.

Case moves. Fast. He FIRES one shot at the nearest robot,

disabling it, then hurls himself at the remaining two,

tackling them both over the edge of the ravine.

Cooper watches them disappear into the void below. Grabs

Brand and the others.

COOPER:

Come on.

Cooper picks up the rifle from the destroyed marine and begins

hiking up the mountain.

EXT. MOUNTAIN PEAK -- DAY

The crew hike towards the ice above.

Below they hear a metallic BOOM as something heavy hits

something else -- Case is still fighting. They keep moving.

EXT. UPPER MOUNTAIN PEAK -- TWILIGHT

They are high above the Marine camp, only fifty feet or so

below the massive ice roof of the cavern. The Chinese have

blasted a tunnel into the ice leading back up to the camp

above.

104.

This high, the air is bitterly cold. Cooper and the others

are hunkered down, trying to keep warm, waiting for night to

fall so that they can climb back up to the lander without

being cooked by the neutron star.

Finally, above them, the light begins to flicker out. The

crew begin pulling on their space suits.

Brand checks on the fractal wildlife in the sample case --

she is bringing it with them. Cooper catches her eye.

BRAND:

We can't leave them all to die.

She hefts the case and they begin climbing up into the ice.

EXT. SURFACE, ICE PLANET -- NIGHT

Brand leads the way, the lights from her suit cutting into

the drifts of snow as they make their way slowly back to the

lander.

As they reach the lander Cooper spots lights emerging from

the ship. He raises Case's weapon.

One of Liu's marines steps around from the back of the lander.

Cooper FIRES.

The marine collapses.

Cooper and the others race to the lander.

BRAND:

Was that the last of them?

DOYLE:

We're not going to stick around to

count them. Let's get out of here.

COOPER:

We're too late.

Cooper points to a damaged section of the ship's hull -- the

marine has torn open a section, revealing damaged hardware.

COOPER (CONT'D)

The main thruster fuel supply. We're

not going anywhere.

Cooper looks down. They're stuck here.

DOYLE:

What about the escape rocket at the

Chinese base camp? One of us could

fit into it.

105.

BRAND:

It doesn't matter how many of us

make it. We have to get this back

to earth.

Roth looks at the moons orbiting overhead.

ROTH:

Can the secondary thrusters still

fire on the lander?

Doyle looks over the craft.

DOYLE:

Sure. But we don't have nearly enough

power for lift off.

Roth holds up the small gravity black box.

ROTH:

(SMILES)

Yes we do.

Roth sets off running towards the Chinese base camp.

EXT. CHINESE BASE CAMP, ICE PLANET -- NIGHT

Cooper drags the pieces of the escape rocket out from the

shelter. Assembly is semiautomatic -- Cooper lifts the pieces

up and they snap together, forming a crude two-stage rocket

designed more for a robot than a man.

When it's complete Roth wedges himself inside, clutching the

black box -- he barely fits.

ROTH:

I can reach one of the moons in low

orbit and turn up its gravity. As

it passes overhead it should be able

to slingshot the lander away from

the planet's surface.

(LOOKS AROUND)

Along with everything else.

COOPER:

But we need to take the box back to

earth.

ROTH:

You don't need this -- only the idea.

The knowledge of how to build it.

Cooper remembers something. Heads back into the shelter.

106.

INT. CHINESE BASE CAMP, ICE PLANET -- NIGHT

Roth follows Cooper into the lab.

Cooper opens the storage crate. Picks one of the probes at

random. Sets it down on the bench next to Roth.

Cooper begins rigging up a connection between the two.

COOPER:

I'm going to image the operating

code and the architecture onto the

probe's hard drive. It'll be garbled,

but it should give you and me enough

to rebuild it when we get back.

Cooper looks at the probe filling up with data.

ROTH:

Not me. But you'll make it work.

The transfer is complete. Roth hands Cooper the probe, and

takes the black box himself.

ROTH (CONT'D)

This is a one-way trip for me.

Before Cooper can respond, Roth heads for the door.

EXT. CHINESE BASE CAMP, ICE PLANET -- NIGHT

Roth squeezes himself into the rocket, hugging the black box

to his chest. Cooper and Brand help him.

BRAND:

This isn't right, Roth. We can find

a way for all of us to leave.

ROTH:

This is the only way. Keep the lander

upright and fire the secondary

boosters when the moon passes

overhead.

COOPER:

Let me take it.

ROTH:

No. You need to make it home. You're

going to need to build more of these.

Brand looks at him, heartbroken. Roth smiles.

107.

ROTH (CONT'D)

I understand the plan, now. Whatever

happens, you have to keep exploring.

Keep learning. One good idea isn't

enough. You'll need more and more

of them just to survive. Do you

understand?

BRAND:

(NODS)

Thank you.

ROTH:

Go.

Brand turns to follow Cooper back.

Behind her, Roth's rocket LAUNCHES on an explosive cloud.

In seconds it's high overhead.

EXT. LANDER -- NIGHT

Cooper checks over the hull, which is intact. Doyle is inside

looking over the controls. He steps back outside.

DOYLE:

Control systems inside are online.

(LOOKS UP)

I've lost sight of the rocket. Do

you think he made it?

COOPER:

We're going to find out soon enough.

Brand is looking off into the distance.

BRAND:

Someone's coming.

Cooper looks up. A robotlike figure is limping through the

snowstorm towards them. Cooper raises the rifle.

Finally he makes out the insignia -- it's Case.

Cooper and Doyle run out towards him. They reach Case as he

collapses in the snow. He's badly injured -- one leg torn

off at the knee, one arm mangled.

Doyle and Cooper drag the crippled robot back into the ship.

INT. LANDER -- NIGHT

They drag Case into the lander. Doyle checks over the ship's

controls.

108.

DOYLE:

Close the door.

Cooper moves to the door. Something's wrong.

COOPER:

Where's Brand?

She's nowhere to be seen. Cooper looks out onto the ice.

Brand is heading back out into the snow.

COOPER (CONT'D)

Dammit. If I don't make it back,

just keep going.

(points to probe)

Get that thing home.

Cooper steps to the door.

EXT. SPACE ABOVE ICE PLANET

The rocket tucks in close behind one of the moons orbiting

the ice planet.

The rocket fires to maneuver closer and closer to the moon's

surface -- the tiny moon doesn't provide enough gravity to

attract it.

When the rocket is close enough, Roth detonates the explosive

bolts holding him inside and leaps for the moon's surface.

He scrambles to grab hold of the craggy surface. Behind

him, the rocket smashes apart against the surface.

Roth finally gets a good hold. He looks down.

Below him, the view is incredible -- the ice planet curving

into the distance, Gargantua rising over its horizon.

Roth looks at the black box in his hands.

EXT. SURFACE, ICE PLANET -- NIGHT

Brand is a hundred yards from the lander by the time Cooper

catches up with her. She is digging in the snow.

He takes her arm but she won't go.

She finally finds what she's looking for -- the sample case.

The tiny fractal life-form is huddled at the bottom.

Cooper shakes his head and turns back to the lander.

109.

EXT. MOON, SPACE OVER ICE PLANET

Roth is watching the ice planet pass by beneath him. He

finally sees the distant peaks of the mountain range as it

punctures the ice near the Chinese camp.

For a moment he enjoys the view -- the distant hulk of

Gargantua rising over the horizon of the shining ice planet.

He takes a final breath and activates the black box.

Instantly, the moon's gravity is magnified a hundred million

times over. Roth is instantly crushed as the moon collapses

around him into a tiny sphere.

EXT. SURFACE, ICE PLANET -- NIGHT

Cooper and Brand are only thirty yards or so from the lander.

Suddenly, the ground beneath them begins to RUMBLE.

Cooper turns back. A mile back the ground begins to tear

apart, heaving massive chunks of ice and rock into the sky.

Roth's moon is racing overhead, TEARING up a massive strip

of the surface's planet as it nears them.

Cooper and Brand run.

EXT. MOON, SPACE OVER ICE PLANET

The energy being unleashed by the tiny box is incredible --

millions of times more powerful than an atomic bomb.

The spray of debris is forming a rooster tail behind the

moon, rocketing up from the planet's surface.

EXT. LANDER, SURFACE, ICE PLANET -- NIGHT

Cooper has almost made it back to the lander. Behind him,

Brand stumbles. He turns back.

Brand is pulling herself up. Behind her, the THUNDEROUS

EXPLOSIONS as a strip of the planet's surface is hurled into

space have almost reached them.

Cooper looks at the ship. He'll never make it if he waits

for Brand. He turns back to find her.

He reaches Brand just as the moon's gravity hits them --

they're hurtled off into space. He grabs her hand.

Seconds later, everything -- the entire ice sheet, the sea

and rocks deep below -- is hurled up after them.

110.

Brand and Cooper embrace as they rocket up through the thin

atmosphere.

Brand looks at him.

BRAND:

(RADIO)

You caught me. Now what?

Cooper looks around. They planet's surface is breaking into

pieces around them.

COOPER:

(RADIO)

I don't know.

(RADIO)

I figured if you were floating out

into space, you'd want some company.

He holds onto her as they fall up and out of the last of the

planet's thin atmosphere and the blackness embraces them.

BRAND:

Between you and utter solitude,

Cooper, frankly, I'm not sure.

They reach the apex of their climb and the gravity of the

planet begins to win out. For a moment they float.

COOPER:

Guess you were right -- too much

gravity, or not enough.

He smiles, forgetting their predicament for a moment. They

stare into each other's eyes.

Then they begin, very gently, to fall back towards the ice

planet.

Suddenly, the lander maneuvers beneath them. The airlock

opens to catch them -- Doyle is at the helm.

Brand and Cooper pull themselves aboard.

INT. LANDER

Cooper closes the door and Doyle rotates the lander outwards.

Doyle FIRES the engines and the lander continues ascending

into space as the debris around them begins crashing back

down towards the ice planet.

Cooper looks out the window:

111.

The moon continues tearing up a massive canyon in the planet's

surface as it circles out of view.

COOPER:

Roth.

BRAND:

He's gone.

Ahead, a shadow looms in the darkness: the Endurance.

INT. OBSERVATION DECK, ENDURANCE

Brand, Cooper, and Doyle pull themselves out of the airlock

and scramble to take control of the ship.

Below them, the surface of the ice planet illuminates as the

neutron star's x-rays begin to reach it from the far side of

Pantagruel.

Doyle finally gets the ship straightened out. Its sole

remaining engine FIRES, rocketing the ship back towards the

dark side of the planet, out of view of the neutron star,

and back towards the original wormhole.

DOYLE:

I'm setting a course for the wormhole.

They're going to make it.

Cooper and Brand make eye contact -- Brand gives him a tiny

awkward smile. He returns it, then descends below.

INT. OUTER HULL, ENDURANCE

Cooper props Case up against the workbench. He pulls down

replacement arms and legs from storage bins. Unwraps them

from their vacuum sealed plastic and bolts them back onto

Case's chassis.

Cooper finishes attaching the arm. Case rotates it, checking

the function.

COOPER:

How is that working?

CASE:

Very well, thank you.

COOPER:

Good. We've already set the course,

skipper. We're going home.

Cooper hauls himself back up into the observation level.

112.

INT. OBSERVATION LEVEL

Doyle is setting the controls. The ALARMS on the controls

have finally abated -- they're out of the danger zone.

BRAND:

We're safe now.

Cooper heads to the communications equipment.

COOPER:

Now I know why we weren't able to

hit the relay. It's not interference --

the blue-shift from the black hole

is more than we thought it would be.

Cooper begins re-calibrating the equipment.

BRAND:

(CONFLICTED)

Cooper, wait--

The ship PINGS the relay on the far side of the wormhole.

There is no response.

COOPER:

Nothing.

(THINKS)

Wait. The ship cached one long

garbled transmission when we first

fell into the swirl. If we account

for the blue shift then the computer

might find something in there.

Cooper brings up the last garbled transmission they received.

The computer begins re-analyzing it, piece by piece.

BRAND:

(QUIET)

Listen to me -- the blueshift also

means we've lost time. More time

than we thought we would.

Cooper looks up at her.

COOPER:

How much?

BRAND:

A lot... Cooper, maybe it's best if

WE DON'T-

The comms equipment TONES as it translates a packet. Then

another.

113.

Then a FLOOD of communications, one packet a day, hundreds

and hundreds of packets: images, videos, audio messages from

family and friends.

Cooper watches, horrified, as the images play out across the

screen. He is watching the lives of his family play out at

light speed. Finally, the packets slow, then stop.

Cooper looks at the results, in shock.

COOPER:

Forty seven years.

Doyle joins him, staring at the screen, stunned.

DOYLE:

My kids...

Cooper tries to PING the relay again. Nothing comes back.

BRAND:

(GENTLE)

The relay will have lost power years

ago. That's why we couldn't contact

it, even after we reached the planet.

Cooper is still problem solving, thinking.

COOPER:

We could bypass the relay. Send a

conventional shortwave signal.

BRAND:

Only a tiny portion of the signal

would make it though the wormhole.

Besides, no one will be listening

anymore.

The comms screen is dead. No movement. Nothing.

Cooper looks at Brand, realizing something.

COOPER:

You knew, didn't you? You and Case

figured it out when we landed.

Brand looks down.

BRAND:

I thought... I couldn't be sure.

COOPER:

Sure you could. You're brilliant.

You know everything.

114.

BRAND:

Cooper... we needed to keep going.

I'm so sorry. Your children...

COOPER:

They're not children any more... if

they're even still alive.

He turns away from her.

BRAND:

Listen, the important thing is that

we're going home, now. And we have

something that can save everyone.

It's more important than the people

we left behind-

Doyle cuts her off, filled with anger.

DOYLE:

That's easy for you to say. You

didn't leave anyone behind.

Cooper looks at Brand, his anger softened by sadness.

COOPER:

Yes she did.

Brand looks at him, grateful for this small kindness.

COOPER (CONT'D)

That's why you were upset -- your

father.

She looks down, filled with sadness.

BRAND:

He's gone. But there are other people

who still need our help. There's

still time...

The ship's controls TONE in ALARM. Brand and Cooper turn:

Case is standing at the controls.

BRAND (CONT'D)

Case... what are you doing?

Case finishes typing in a sequence on the command controls.

Presses the "execute" button.

The last nuclear engine begins to detach from the ship.

BRAND (CONT'D)

Wait... no...

115.

The robot turns from them. Cooper notices that the control

module snapped into the back of Case's chassis is wrong:

It's red with a gold star. It's not Case at all. It's Liu.

LIU:

I'm sorry. I have my orders. No

one follows...

Liu stares, satisfied, as the nuclear engine spins away from

the ship and back down toward Pantagruel.

Cooper SMASHES Liu from behind. The robot tumbles to the

ground, the fight gone out of him.

Cooper and Doyle roll the robot over and Cooper reaches for

his control module.

LIU (CONT'D)

No one follows-

Cooper rips the module out. The robot freezes.

Brand is already at the controls, trying to regain control.

The instruments TONE, alerting the crew to their position:

The ship is spinning back down towards the black hole.

BRAND:

No... We're being pulled back to

Pantagruel.

Cooper, frantically checks the controls, firing the remaining

boosters.

COOPER:

We can't let that happen. We'll

lose more time... too much...

The boosters are no match for the deadly pull of the black

hole below them.

On the ship's guidance, they watch, helpless, as the ship

climbs back up the volcano rim towards the critical orbit.

As on their first trip, the black hole grows to dominate the

bottom of the sky, and the stars above them become streaks --

time is speeding for them as they are whirled down into the

deep gravity well around the hole.

As they watch, trapped, decades begin to play out in the

system above them. They watch as the ice planet whirls around

them, orbiting the black hole dozens of times.

116.

COOPER (CONT'D)

We're losing years.

Finally, the ice planet plunges past them towards destruction.

As it reaches it slows, until finally it reaches the event

horizon, just as they saw in the projections. Nothing has

prepared them for the reality:

The ice planet is SMASHED apart with stunning violence.

Brand looks at the sample of fractal life. Now they are

united -- they are, in all likelihood, the sole survivors of

their planet.

Doyle points to the instruments.

DOYLE:

The wormhole. Look -- it's being

pulled into the black hole as well.

They watch on the holographic model as the wormhole's orbit

converges on the event horizon of the black hole.

BRAND:

It's orbit mirrored the ice planet's.

COOPER:

What will happen to it?

BRAND:

It'll be destroyed, like everything

else.

Cooper struggles to pull himself over to the communications

screen. Sets it to make a shortwave broadcast. Brand opens

her mouth to point out that it's futile, then stops.

COOPER:

(INTO RADIO)

This is the crew of the Endurance.

We...

(gives up on

FORMALITIES)

Murph, I'm sorry. I'm sorry I didn't

make it back, like I promised.

He hangs up the radio.

In silence, they watch as the wormhole -- their only way

home -- vanishes beneath the event horizon.

DOYLE:

How much time are we losing?

117.

BRAND:

(HEARTBROKEN)

Decades...hundreds of years.

COOPER:

All of those people back home...

none of them will make it.

As Doyle watches the controls the ship continues to spiral

towards the black hole.

DOYLE:

This is it. We're going to be pulled

in.

Cooper looks at the controls, an idea forming.

He pulls himself down. Hauls himself across the deck to

pick up Liu's chip. He plugs it into a diagnostic tool.

BRAND:

What are you doing?

COOPER:

Case said the Chinese found something

else. The location was scrubbed

from their records. But I bet he

knows it.

Cooper fires up the chip. Begins sorting through the onboard

memory.

Doyle watches the instruments.

DOYLE:

Hurry up.

Cooper concentrates, poring over the numbers. Finally he

begins feeding coordinates into the navigation computer.

COOPER:

Here. Can we reach it?

Brand looks at the map. The point appears on the far side

of Gargantua. Brand studies the trajectory.

BRAND:

We can use the thrusters to keep us

on the critical orbit. Then slingshot

us towards Gargantua.

The thrusters STRAIN to push the ship back up towards the

critical orbit.

118.

Suddenly, the tidal gravity SLAMS them against the walls of

the ship.

Finally, the thrusters fire again -- a tiny push, but just

enough to launch the ship clear of the black hole, like a

rock out of a slingshot.

The ship races toward the massive hole in the sky below them:

GARGANTUA:

EXT. SPACE AROUND GARGANTUA

The ship picks up more and more speed as it soars closer to

the massive black hole's event horizon.

INT. OBSERVATION DECK, ENDURANCE

The sky closes to a tiny hole above them. Gargantua is

swallowing their view.

Cooper looks at the radar, which is choked with debris.

DOYLE:

We only have a few minutes before

we're swallowed into that thing.

What are we even looking for?

On the radar, a tiny empty spot appears.

COOPER:

(points to screen)

That? What is it?

Brand looks. In one tiny region on the back side of the

black hole, the debris simply seems to vanish.

BRAND:

It's another wormhole.

Doyle FIRES the thrusters again, pushing the ship towards

the wormhole.

EXT. SPACE AROUND GARGANTUA

The Endurance spins, shifting paths slightly as it continues

to race closer and closer to oblivion.

INT. OBSERVATION DECK, ENDURANCE

They study the controls. The projected path shifts, one

degree at a time. Finally, it appears to put them on a path

to hit the wormhole.

Doyle shuts off the thrusters.

119.

DOYLE:

We're not going to be able to slow

down. Hold onto something.

He locks up the controls.

EXT. SPACE AROUND GARGANTUA -- MORNING

The ship is tumbling through space, racing toward the second

wormhole. It is massive, much larger than the first wormhole,

and it's glowing with a light as bright as a star.

INT. OBSERVATION DECK, ENDURANCE

The crew brace themselves against the hull of the ship.

Suddenly the ship slams onto the wormhole mouth and is pulled

violently into the wormhole.

WHITENESS.

As the light fades, Cooper and the others come to.

The light is rapidly dimming from pure white, fading to a

deep red, then infrared, finally darkness.

Cooper looks out. Checks the instruments. Looks out again.

EXT. VACUUM

Nothing. Blackness as far as the eye can see. No stars.

No planets. Just inky darkness stretching on forever.

INT. OBSERVATION DECK, ENDURANCE

Brand joins Cooper on the deck. Together, they look out at

the blackness that surrounds them.

COOPER:

Where are we?

BRAND:

I don't know. It's like we entered

the wormhole and never left it.

Brand checks the instruments. There is nothing for the ship

to model.

There is nowhere to go. They drift.

INT. OBSERVATION DECK, ENDURANCE

Days go by. They check the instruments. Still nothing.

It's as if they have left the known universe altogether.

120.

INT. COMMUNICATIONS ROOM, ENDURANCE

Doyle sits down. After a moment, he turns on the screen and

cues up a message.

His children appear on-screen, giggling, pushing each other,

trying to get a prime spot in front of the camera.

Doyle cups his face in his hands and cries.

INT. CREW QUARTERS, ENDURANCE

Cooper above his bunk, stares out into the blackness.

Brand watches him from the doorway.

BRAND:

I'm sorry. I should have told you.

I didn't have the right.

(BEAT)

But you should watch the recordings.

You should know what happened to

your kids.

Cooper ignores her.

INT. COMMUNICATIONS ROOM, ENDURANCE

Brand watches her father talking to her on-screen. He is

twenty years older than when she left him.

BRAND'S FATHER

I'm not going to make it much longer.

The machines will continue to maintain

the station as long as they can and

the communications will run as long

as the station here still has power.

I'm sorry. I hope wherever you are,

darling, you're safe.

The screen cuts out. Brand watches the static play out.

INT. OBSERVATION DECK, ENDURANCE

Doyle sits at the table. He has found a flair gun in one of

the ditch kits. It is sitting on the table in front of him.

The message is clear.

Brand sits down across from him.

BRAND:

Our last trip past the black hole

cost us another 100, maybe 200 years.

Which means there's a good chance

we're the only humans alive anywhere.

121.

She stands up.

BRAND (CONT'D)

I think the last human beings should

have a little more fight in them

than that.

Brand picks up the sample of fractal life and places it under

a lamp on the counter. It freezes, absorbing the rays.

Doyle looks at the gun.

EXT. ENDURANCE, VACUUM

Cooper, in a space suit, steps out of the airlock.

He drifts out from the ship.

Nothing. Behind him, the ship is a tiny speck in an ocean

of darkness.

INT. COMMUNICATIONS ROOM, ENDURANCE

Cooper sits down. Turns on the screen.

After a moment, the camera turns on. Tom, his eldest son,

still 15 years old, turns on the camera.

TOM:

Hi, Dad.

Cooper pauses it. He can't take it. After a moment, he

lets it run again.

TOM (CONT'D)

I met another girl, Dad. I really

think this is the one.

Tom holds up a picture of himself and a teenage GIRL.

TOM (CONT'D)

Murph stole Grandpa's car. He crashed

it. He's OK, though. No broken

bones.

Cooper leans back.

INT. COMMUNICATIONS ROOM, ENDURANCE

Cooper is holed up, still watching, several days' growth of

beard unshaved. He's been watching for days.

On the screen, Tom is a grown man in his 20s.

122.

TOM:

I've got a surprise for you, Dad.

You're a grandpa.

Tom holds up an infant wrapped tight in swaddling. The kid

is BAWLING.

TOM (CONT'D)

Congratulations. Grandpa said he

already earned the "great" bit so we

just leave it at that.

The screen cuts out.

The next message begins. Tom is in his 30s.

TOM (CONT'D)

Hi, Dad. I'm sorry it's been awhile.

He stops, emotional.

TOM (CONT'D)

Grandpa died last week. We buried

him out in the back forty, next to

Mom.

(LOOKS DOWN)

Where we'd have buried you, if you'd

ever come back.

He laughs, gallows humor.

TOM (CONT'D)

Murph was there for the funeral.

It's been a few years since I've

seen him. He's been down in the

Gulf Coast. He's an engineer. I

guess someone followed in your

footsteps after all.

Tom looks down.

TOM (CONT'D)

You're not listening to this. I

know that. All of these messages

are just out there, drifting in the

darkness.

He stops for a second.

TOM (CONT'D)

You're gone. You're never coming

back. And I've known that for a

long time. Lois says -- that's my

wife, Dad -- she says I have to let

you go. So I am.

123.

He reaches up to turn off the camera.

TOM (CONT'D)

Wherever you are, I hope you're at

peace. Goodbye, Dad.

The image freezes, Tom's hand on the camera, then breaks

apart into digital noise.

Then nothing.

Cooper looks at it for a second. Then rises to leave.

Suddenly, the screen flickers to life again.

A good-looking man in his late 30s turns on a camera. Cooper

recognizes him instantly. It's Murph.

Murph looks at the camera for a long beat, clearly unsure

about this.

MURPH:

Hello, Dad. You sonofabitch.

He laughs, self-conscious.

MURPH (CONT'D)

It's your 60th birthday today.

Thought I would celebrate with you a

bit.

(BEAT)

I guess I understand why you left.

The corn is dying now, too.

Tom says there's less and less at

harvest every year.

He pauses. Lifts up his hand and scratches his stubble.

Cooper pauses the message. He looks carefully at the screen:

Murph is wearing his dad's watch.

Cooper lets the message play. Tears are streaming down his

face.

MURPH (CONT'D)

Rot's setting in. I guess you were

right for clearing out while you had

the chance.

(reaches up to switch

OFF CAMERA)

Good luck, old man. I hope you made

it. I really do.

The video cuts out.

124.

A message appears on the screen:

"Final transmission." Relay powered down 05232087

Cooper turns off the screen.

INT. CREW QUARTERS, ENDURANCE

Cooper is seated, alone. Almost every compartment has been

opened and emptied -- debris is swirling through the

compartment.

Brand walks in. They sit in silence for a moment. When

Cooper speaks, it's clear his sadness has faded to a gallows

humor.

COOPER:

Not a single drink on the whole ship.

What kind of mission is this?

BRAND:

I think Doyle's been experimenting

with the coolant from his spacesuit.

They sit in silence for a moment.

COOPER:

You really think we're the last humans

alive anywhere?

BRAND:

I don't know. Maybe.

(looks him in the eye)

Yes.

COOPER:

So that's it, then? That's all?

He looks down, saddened by his own words.

BRAND:

(QUIET)

It's happened a billion times over.

Stars explode. The pieces drift in

space. Gravity pulls them back

together. They form new stars.

Then planets. Then us. We die. It

starts all over again.

Cooper shakes his head.

COOPER:

What about the plan? The grand

scheme.

125.

BRAND:

I thought you didn't believe in one.

COOPER:

I didn't. But you were bringing me

round.

He laughs, his anger coming and going in waves.

COOPER (CONT'D)

What the hell was the point? What

did it add up to?

BRAND:

I don't know. Maybe it just adds up

to this.

COOPER:

This? You're saying the end result

of ten billion years is the atoms

from dead stars standing here

disagreeing with each other.

She smiles at him. Bittersweet.

BRAND:

Maybe that's enough.

He turns away from her. She takes his shoulder.

She pulls him into a kiss. His surprise disappears and he

pulls her to him, kissing her back.

Their surroundings forgotten, they drift. She LAUGHS gently

as they bump into a wall and he pushes off of it, sending

them spinning back into the center of the cabin.

She pulls his shirt off and it hangs in space. In moments,

the cabin is filling with discarded clothes, different colors

and shapes, like a ticker tape parade.

In the center of the cabin, Brand and Cooper make love.

INT. CREW QUARTERS, ENDURANCE -- LATER

Cooper and Brand embrace, sleeping, drifting in the cabin.

Suddenly, Doyle's voice calls out from the other cabin.

DOYLE (O.S.)

It's happening... it's happening

again... Get up here...

Cooper wakes, careful not to disturb Brand. He plucks his

shirt from the floating laundry pile and pulls it on.

126.

INT. OBSERVATION DECK, ENDURANCE

Cooper hauls himself up into the upper cabin. Doyle is

standing in the middle of the chamber.

DOYLE:

They just appeared.

A sphere of distortion, like the one they encountered in the

first wormhole, is directly in front of Doyle, hovering at a

point in the middle of the cabin.

Doyle points a finger gently at the sphere, which grows in

response.

Brand pulls herself into the cabin. Several more points

appear, as if they've been summoned by the first.

Some of the points twist, some of them spin, and some of

them are motionless.

BRAND:

I think these are the creatures that

built the wormhole.

One of them begins to move closer to Cooper.

COOPER:

This thing is made of... gravity?

BRAND:

No. I don't think it's in our

universe at all. I think it lives

in the bulk -- the space that the

wormholes traverse. And it can only

interact with us using gravity.

The shape playfully grows around Cooper's hand, bending the

space it's in, stretching the skin.

Doyle GASPS as the sphere nearest him moves through his body,

coming to rest in the middle and bending his entire torso

like a fun house mirror.

Suddenly, the sphere wrapped around Cooper's hand begins

moving, tugging him gently through the cabin.

In the next moment, all three of them are being propelled

through the cabin.

It's a magical moment -- a communion, a dance between

creatures on either side of a massive, invisible wall.

Doyle exclaims like a kid on a roller coaster as he is whirled

around the room.

127.

Cooper and Brand collide with each other for a second as the

bulk beings move them through space. They hold onto each

other for a moment and then are pulled apart again as the

whirling dance continues.

Even the fractal creature is involved -- inside its cage, a

tiny distortion ripples its fractal skin. The creature breaks

apart and plays with the distortion around its enclosure.

Finally, Brand disengages from the dance and pulls herself

around the lab, looking for some way to try to communicate

with the creatures.

She finds two heavy pieces of engineering equipment and moves

them close to each other, then far apart.

The bulk beings soon join her, mimicking the motion of the

pieces of equipment.

COOPER:

Can we communicate with them?

BRAND:

Where would we even start? Maybe--

She pull a bag of ball bearings out of a storage bin and

tears the bag open, releasing a cloud of the tiny shining

globes into the air.

For a moment, nothing happens. Then, the distortions begin

moving through the bearings, shifting them, rearranging them

into patterns in the air.

First, they rearrange the ball bearings into clusters, then

shapes spinning around each other -- planets orbiting around

a medium-sized star.

DOYLE:

That's our solar system.

After a moment the ball bearings break apart again and

rearrange into a larger, more complicated system -- Gargantua,

Pantagruel, and the ice planet.

Finally, the bearings compress to a two-dimensional sheet.

Inside the sheet, one solitary ball bearing orbits around

the stars and then pushes up, off of the sheet, into an

umbrella shaped space that rises up from the sheet.

COOPER:

What is that?

Brand looks at the tiny particle, floating alone above its

universe.

128.

BRAND:

That's us. That's where they've

brought us. We're in the bulk.

Cooper and Doyle stare at the particle. The map is static

now.

Cooper looks around. The distortions have gone. The

instruments on the ship TONE in alarm.

Cooper walks through the map, sending the ball bearings

scattering. He hurries to the instruments. The ship is

moving -- picking up speed at a huge rate.

BRAND (CONT'D)

They're moving us.

DOYLE:

Where?

They stand, looking out into the perfect darkness.

EXT. ENDURANCE, VACUUM

The ship begins to close in on something in the darkness: a

tiny point of light.

As they grow closer, they realize that it's an opening.

They are inside a massive, hollow sphere. They have been

the entire time.

The ship is guided out through the opening at the crown of

the sphere.

Below them is an astonishing sight:

Our entire universe, compressed into a flattened disc, like

a floor of stars. They are hovering above it, in the bulk,

the space between universes.

INT. ENDURANCE, BULK

Brand and the others stare at the incredible display.

The ship drops down and begins to orbit around the massive

hollow sphere between them and our universe, lower and lower

until it is skimming just above the surface of the sphere.

In the distance, they can make out a cluster of lights.

COOPER:

There's something out there.

The cluster of lights grows as they are propelled closer:

129.

It's a massive space station, built onto the surface of the

sphere.

EXT. SPACE STATION

The Endurance glides to a gentle stop on one of the upper

decks of the space station.

After a moment, the airlock to the ship opens and Cooper and

the others step out, in their suits.

They walk up to the airlock doors of the station, which open

automatically.

INT. SPACE STATION

After the airlock decompresses, the inner doors open.

Standing there, waiting for them, is a familiar figure:

Tars.

TARS:

(DEADPAN)

I guess this isn't robot heaven after

all.

The light on his brow glows and he offers them both a hand.

INT. GRAND LABORATORY, SPACE STATION

The humans have taken off their space suits -- the station

has been built to be habitable by humans -- and are following

Tars through the massive facility.

TARS:

I orbited the black hole seven times

before I hit the second wormhole.

Then I drifted until I found this

place.

Cooper looks around. The halls are filled with countless

technological wonders.

COOPER:

This is what the Chinese were

protecting.

(LOOKS AROUND)

How they could have built all this

in just a handful of years.

TARS:

They didn't. It took them four

thousand.

(off Brand's look)

Time moves very slowly here

130.

BRAND:

How do you know?

TARS:

Because I've been waiting for you

for three hundred years.

Brand looks around at the massive facility.

BRAND:

Time. That's what the bulk beings

wanted to give us. That was the

treasure the Chinese found. Enough

time to let us save ourselves.

Brand looks around. The facility is massive. She sets the

specimen case down on a table. Even the tiny creature seems

in awe of the place.

INT. LABORATORY, SPACE STATION

Tars shows them a prototype for the gravity machine. It is

tiny -- increasing G around two spheres that attract each

other with a tiny force.

TARS:

I have catalogued almost everything

they had built here.

COOPER:

Must have taken you a while.

TARS:

One hundred and fifty-seven years.

Cooper shakes his head in disbelief.

COOPER:

How are they keeping the lights on

in this thing?

Tars, in answer, points to a far door.

TARS:

Follow me.

INT. ENGINE ROOM, SPACE STATION

A massive reinforced-concrete shell shudders with the energy

contained within it. The whole room HUMS with power.

Tars pulls up a display showing the inside of the shell:

A tiny black hole spins, spewing out massive amounts of power.

131.

TARS:

It's a mini black hole. A remnant

of the big bang. It will power this

place forever.

Tars leads them on.

EXT. HANGAR, SPACE STATION

Tars leads them past an incredibly sleek fleet of spacecraft.

Cooper starts to stop, but Tars doesn't slow down.

INT. SIMULATION ROOM

In the center of the room is a giant holographic globe of

the Earth, perfect down to the tiniest detail.

COOPER:

It's a map?

TARS:

No. Not a map. This is a simulation

of the Earth. A perfect simulation.

Tars touches the control panel. The map zooms in over Europe.

Down onto Paris. Late 20th century:

People walk through the streets. A woman stops at a newsagent

to buy a newspaper.

Tars touches the controls again and the map zooms out.

TARS (CONT'D)

They tested each of the technologies

hundreds of times, trying to find

the one that would cause the least

damage and still allow us to leave

Earth.

Suddenly, the map lights up with atomic explosions in every

city. The sequence stops, rewinds.

This time, sped up, the Earth seems to be drying up -- great

swaths of desert grow across Europe and Asia. Massive

circular ships are constructed all over the face of the Earth.

TARS (CONT'D)

This was their best solution. A

massive version of the box we found

on the ice planet, allowing the entire

human population to escape.

At a given moment, the gravity of the Earth is dropped to

nothing and the massive ships, filled with the entire

132.

population of the Earth, lift gently off of the planet in

search of greener pastures.

Cooper turns away from the machine, bitter.

COOPER:

So why didn't they return? Why didn't

they save us?

Brand is staring at the massive map.

BRAND:

Because they were too late. By the

time they found this place, the people

who sent them were dead. They were

unable to fulfill their mission.

Tars points to the next room.

TARS:

That was the final problem they tried

to solve.

Tars moves on.

EXT. PLATFORM, SPACE STATION

Above them, the blackness of the sky is punctuated with

hundreds of crystal shapes, faintly leaking starlight:

Wormholes. Brand looks up at them, entranced.

BRAND:

Where do they lead?

Tars looks at an illuminated schematic on one wall, mapping

some of the wormholes.

TARS:

There are millions of them, connecting

virtually every planetary system in

the universe. There are thousands

in our galaxy alone. But the Chinese

stopped mapping them when they found

what they were looking for.

Tars walks further. He stops.

The platform in front of them is dominated by a gigantic

version of the black box that Roth found on the ice planet,

connected to a massive power array, and pointing into the

dark space above the sphere.

133.

TARS (CONT'D)

This was their final creation. They

had to capture the mini black hole

just to have enough power to try it.

Several miles above the black box, one of the wormholes glows

far brighter than the others, crackling with radiation.

DOYLE:

What does it do?

Cooper steps forward. Runs a hand on the cold, strange

material the antenna is made out of. He knows exactly what

it does.

COOPER:

They weren't interested in the other

wormholes because their mission was

to return home. That one leads back

to Earth. The Earth they were told

to return to.

Tars walks to the controls for the device.

BRAND:

But that's impossible...

Tars turns away from the machine.

TARS:

It was only used once. The Chinese

team attempted to travel back in

time, to Earth just a few years after

they had left.

COOPER:

Did they make it?

TARS:

I don't know.

Doyle looks back to Cooper.

DOYLE:

Do you really think it works?

Cooper looks up at the machine, suddenly determined.

COOPER:

We're going to find out.

Cooper walks out of the room. Brand follows him.

134.

EXT. AIRLOCK, SPACE STATION

Brand follows Cooper as he walks up to the Endurance.

BRAND:

You know it doesn't work. Time travel

isn't possible.

COOPER:

You don't know that.

BRAND:

Yes, I do. If it worked, the Chinese

would have suddenly discovered all

of these incredible technologies.

But they never made it.

(BEAT)

You can't go back, Cooper. You can

slow things down, but you can't ever

go back. Our home is gone.

(off his look)

You listened to all of those messages

from your family. If you had made

it back, we would already know.

There would already be some evidence.

Cooper looks at the machine.

BRAND (CONT'D)

If you try to use it, you'll die,

just like the people who built it.

She puts an arm on his shoulder.

BRAND (CONT'D)

Roth was right, Cooper. We have to

keep going. Keep exploring. We

have an obligation to try to survive.

From here we could find a thousand

places where life could thrive. And

you're going to return to the one

place where it can't.

COOPER:

I made a promise.

He turns away from her, resolute.

EXT. HANGAR, SPACE STATION

Cooper and Doyle check over one of the sleek Chinese

spaceships.

135.

INT. CHINESE SPACESHIP

Cooper is checking over the controls of the ship. Brand

walks in.

BRAND:

I came to say goodbye.

Cooper looks up at her.

INT. HANGAR, SPACE STATION

Cooper walks Brand back to the Endurance. The ship is packed

up and repaired. Brand is looking over their work.

COOPER:

You could have taken one of the other

ships.

BRAND:

This one's done all right by us so

far.

Brand holds up a small sample case containing half of the

fractal life-form.

BRAND (CONT'D)

Will you take this with you? It's

the last of its kind as well. Thought

we should double its chances of

survival. In case I'm wrong.

Cooper takes the sample and looks at the tiny creature inside,

trying to escape. He sets it inside the ship. Turns back

to her.

COOPER:

Where are you going to go?

BRAND:

I don't know. Up there, I guess.

She points up into the great darkness above them.

Tars steps down. Moves over to them.

COOPER:

You're going, too?

TARS:

I'm curious. It's my nature. See

you down the road?

Tars shakes Cooper's hand. Heads onto the Endurance.

136.

BRAND:

Come with us. Please. You wanted

your whole life to explore. This is

your chance.

Cooper stares at her. This is what he has always wanted.

And he has to turn it down.

COOPER:

I'm sorry. I have to find out what

happened to my sons. I promised

them.

Brand sees the resolve in his eyes. Knows there's no way to

change his mind.

BRAND:

You're a man who keeps his promises.

Make me one-

She takes his hand.

BRAND (CONT'D)

After you're done... come find me.

COOPER:

I promise.

They kiss passionately. Not wanting it to end but knowing

that it must. Reluctantly, they separate. Brand turns back

to the ship.

She pulls herself onto the ship. Cooper steps back outside

and watches through the tiny window as the Endurance lifts

off and disappears into the darkness.

Cooper turns away.

EXT. PLATFORM, SPACE STATION

Cooper watches as radiation pours out of the wormhole high

above them.

INT. CHINESE SPACESHIP

Cooper pulls himself on board. Doyle is at the controls.

He keys the controls and the ship lifts off.

DOYLE:

Let's go home.

The two men sit in silence as the ship arcs away from the

space station and closes in on the wormhole.

Cooper hears a familiar CHIRP. He turns around:

137.

The probe they took from the ice planet is belted securely

into one of the seats, filled with the garbled machine code

of the gravitational machine.

COOPER:

The probe...

Doyle looks back.

DOYLE:

We get back to earth, you and I can

try to make sense of the code.

Rebuild the gravity machine.

Cooper stares at it, suddenly realizing something. He

unbuckles himself.

Cooper stands and walks over to the probe. Traces the

familiar stars and stripes carved into its side.

Cooper stares at the probe, putting it all together.

COOPER:

It's going to work.

DOYLE:

Of course it's going to work.

COOPER:

That's not what I mean. This is the

probe I found in Galveston.

Below them, the wormhole breaks as it reaches another wormhole

mouth that the Chinese have dropped down to a lower gravity

well, creating a time machine.

The wormhole mouth is FLARING with radiation.

COOPER (CONT'D)

Brand said there'd be some evidence

we'd made it. And there was. This.

(holds up probe)

But only this. Everything will be

destroyed except for this.

He moves toward Doyle. Doyle stands.

COOPER (CONT'D)

We have to stop.

DOYLE:

I don't know what you're talking

about, but you're not touching the

controls. I'm going home.

138.

Cooper moves closer to Doyle. Doyle pulls out the flair

gun. Points it at Cooper.

COOPER:

You don't need to do this. We won't

make it back, but this does. The

secrets are already right on it.

Maybe someone found it. There's

hope.

(SAD)

But we don't get to go with.

DOYLE:

You're not stopping me. I'm going

home.

Doyle forces Cooper into the ship's lander. Then he closes

the airlock.

Cooper pounds on the other side of the glass, trying to reason

with him.

The landing craft detaches from the ship.

INT. CHINESE LANDING CRAFT

Cooper watches, helpless, as Doyle's ship races ahead towards

the glowing wormhole mouth.

As the ship speeds toward the next wormhole, the radiation

suddenly FLARES, annihilating the ship and everything in it.

Almost everything.

Cooper's landing craft spins away from the wormhole mouth.

CUT TO:

EXT. SPACE, OUR SOLAR SYSTEM

A hole opens in the sky with a FIERY EXPLOSION. As the

radiation subsides, all that shoots out of the hole is a

vaporous wisp of atomized metal, and a burned, blackened

probe, which hurtles toward Earth.

EXT. SPACE, NEAR EARTH ORBIT

The probe collides with a satellite, hurling debris into the

upper atmosphere.

PROBE'S ONBOARD CAMERA P.O.V. --

The probe's onboard camera documents its journey. Fragments

OF VIDEO:

139.

-- The probe HURTLES through the atmosphere, toward North

America, the Gulf Coast.

-- The probe SMASHES down into a sandbar.

-- Daylight. A man is descending toward it, dangling from a

rope. It's Cooper.

-- Night. A kitchen. A little boy -- Murph -- stares at

the probe, while Cooper works at it with a blowtorch.

-- Tars pulls the probe out of the back of a plane.

-- Brand's father, older, studies the probe. Gives up.

-- Much later. People are moving around in the darkened

base, scavenging equipment.

CUT TO:

EXT. FIELD -- DAY

A combine harvester is dead in a field, service hatch opened.

A MAN is lying under the machine, working.

The man hauls himself out from under the huge machine. Dusts

himself off.

It's Murph, 30s. He looks at the FARMER who is waiting for

the verdict. Murph shakes his head.

MURPH:

It's done. Auto-pilot's packed up

for the last time.

FARMER:

You can't make it work a little

longer?

MURPH:

Can't do anything for you. There

aren't any more parts for these.

Not anywhere.

FARMER:

You don't understand. We're getting

less than a hundred pounds per acre.

We need to plant more, not less.

Murph looks around him at the pathetic crop of corn that

stretches around them. The plants are feeble, barely able

to support themselves.

140.

FARMER (CONT'D)

You've got to find us some more parts,

Murph. It's getting desperate.

Isn't there anywhere you can look?

Murph begins packing up his tools, thinking it over.

INT. HANGAR -- DAY

Murph stares at the darkened shape of a plane under a tarp.

He stares at the tarp, unsure if he wants to keep going.

He pulls the tarp off, revealing Cooper's old Piper Cub. He

checks over the engine, lights, prop. Turns the key. Fires

her up. The diesel wakes with a GRUNT.

EXT. AIRSTRIP -- DAY

Murph wheels the old plane out onto the field by hand.

EXT. SKIES OVER THE SOUTHWEST -- DAY

The ancient plane skirts the San Gabriels.

EXT. FIELD, SANTA CRUZ ISLAND

Murph sets the plane down.

He parks the plane under a copse of trees and climbs down.

He scans the horizon. Nothing. Is this the place?

EXT. FOREST -- DAY

Murph pushes his way through the undergrowth. Stops.

He's standing at the blast doors to the facility. They've

been blown open with dynamite.

INT. NASA FACILITY -- DAY

Murph lets himself inside. Lights a flare.

The place has been gutted. Thieves and scavengers have taken

almost everything.

Murph finds one of the robots, or what's left of it -- it's

been stripped, leaving only the bare composite skeleton.

The empty eye sockets stare back at Murph.

Murph looks around the place. There is nothing left to

salvage. He turns to leave. Hears a familiar CHIRP.

In the corner, under a pile of rain-soaked garbage:

141.

The probe.

No one has bothered to steal it. Murph stares at it.

INT. UNDERGROUND FACILITY -- NIGHT

Murph sweeps detritus off of an ancient computer mainframe

that survived the looting. He hooks the probe up to it.

After a minute, the screen fills with a picture of an ice-

covered planet. Then nothing. The rest of the probe's drive

is filled with garbage, noise.

Murph switches off the screen.

He stands. Begins to leave without the probe. Stops. Turns

back. Picks it up and takes it with him.

INT. KITCHEN, MURPH'S HOUSE -- NIGHT

Murph is hunched over the probe, trying to pull data off of

it with a defibrillator. He has incorporated an ancient

laptop into the chain, and is tweaking values on it, trying

to decrypt the contents.

His WIFE, several months pregnant, turns back to him from

the stove.

MURPH'S WIFE

Would you get that thing off of the

table?

Murph nods, absorbed. Keys in a final tweak to the decryption

software. Hits return.

Suddenly, the screen begins filling with data.

Murph stares at it, wide eyed.

CUT TO:

INT. BARN -- NIGHT

Murph, now in his 40s, is putting the finishing touches on a

large machine. Although slightly different, we recognize

some of the components and their configuration:

It's a crude version of the gravitational device.

Murph double checks it, then fires up a small gas powered

generator. Throws a breaker, feeding power to the unit.

The unit lights up. HUMS. But nothing happens.

142.

Murph, disappointed but undaunted, shuts it down and begins

checking it over. He hears a noise at the door. Turns back.

His daughter, Emily, 8, is standing at the door.

EMILY COOPER:

Dad? You said you'd take us to the

game.

MURPH:

(DISTRACTED)

Did I?

He looks at the impossible nest of wires. Shakes his head.

MURPH (CONT'D)

All right. Let me get my jacket.

Murph picks up his jacket from the workbench. Next to it on

the bench is a shortwave radio playing STATIC.

EMILY COOPER:

(staring at machine)

What is it supposed to do, Dad?

MURPH:

I have no idea.

Murph switches off the lights and they walk out.

After a moment, the radio CRACKLES to life in the darkness.

COOPER:

(over radio, garbled)

This is the crew of the Endurance...

Murph... I'm sorry...

The signal crackles out.

CUT TO:

INT. KITCHEN, MURPH'S HOUSE -- DAY

Murph, 50s, slightly gray, sits at his kitchen table. He

hears a distant RUMBLE.

He looks up. His wife is standing by the sink.

MURPH:

Where's Emily?

WIFE:

Out in the barn. She's been tinkering

with your old projects.

143.

Murph stands up. The roof of the barn is visibly shaking.

He steps outside.

EXT. YARD, MURPH'S HOUSE -- DAY

Murph moves towards the barn, concerned. The shaking is

growing stronger -- the entire structure is buckling.

Emily, now 18, backs out of the barn.

EMILY COOPER:

Dad... I'm sorry... I made some

changes to the machine. I think I

did something wrong.

Murph puts an arm around his daughter and as they watch, the

entire barn IMPLODES. Their tractor begins sliding towards

the wreckage of the barn, chunky tires plowing up the soil.

Finally, the RUMBLING STOPS as the power lines short out in

a FIERY display.

As the dust clears, Murph and his daughter examine the mess:

The entire barn has been crushed into a tiny ball.

Murph looks at his daughter.

MURPH:

Do you remember what you changed?

Wide-eyed, she thinks about it. Then nods.

CUT TO:

EXT. EARTH, 2320 -- DAY

This is North America. But it doesn't look much like it.

Mother Nature has just about wiped the slate clean. Most of

the vegetation is gone, and unchecked winds sweep across the

barren plains. Patches of ice lie think on the ground, as

if a heavy snow has come and gone.

SUPER TITLE:
"TWO HUNDRED YEARS LATER"

One of the Chinese spaceships descends through the thick

clouds above and settles gently onto the plain.

The hatch opens and Cooper steps out. He takes a cautious

look around. He is holding the fractal life in its small

container.

The clouds are threatening, but the weather looks calm enough

right here.

144.

Cooper starts to walk.

EXT. COLLAPSED HOUSE -- DAY

Remarkably, part of Cooper's old house is still standing.

INT. COLLAPSED HOUSE -- DAY

Cooper stands in the middle of his kitchen. Two walls are

missing and the rest is collapsed in a heap. But he can

still see where he used to feed his kids breakfast.

He has kept his promise. Several hundred years too late.

Cooper hunkers down, staring at the space where his kids

used to be. Rainwater covers the ancient formica.

It has taken him years to finally reach this place. He has

had plenty of time to come to grips with what he might find.

But nothing has prepared him for this:

He is completely alone. Nothing is left.

INT. COLLAPSED FARMHOUSE -- NIGHT

Cooper is still sitting there when the ice storm hits.

Unchecked by trees or vegetation, the wind rockets through

the house, blasting Cooper and pelting what's left of the

structure with fist-sized hail.

Cooper takes shelter against the remaining wall. He's going

to have to sit this one out -- the hail and winds are the

brutal descendants of the weather he knew. They'll finish

him off if he steps back outside.

As he watches, the pool of water on the kitchen floor freezes

over in seconds.

INT. COLLAPSED FARMHOUSE -- DAWN

Cooper shivers, pressed against the wall. The storm is still

raging outside. He is freezing to death. He has to move

now or he will die. He pulls the hood tight around his face

and stumbles outside.

EXT. SNOWBOUND FIELD -- DAY

Cooper makes his way through the blinding snow. He tries to

find his way, but the ship has been consumed by the blizzard.

He stumbles to the ground, dropping the glass case with the

fractal wildlife in it. The case shatters.

Cooper tries to stand back up, but his strength is dwindling.

145.

As he watches, the fractal wildlife creeps tentatively out

of its broken habitat. It forms together against the cold.

After a moment, it burrows into the ice. As it does, the

ice glows faintly. It seems to be right at home.

Cooper laughs, glimpsing the outline of a plan. Was this

what the beings who made the wormhole intended all along?

Cooper suddenly spots the outline of the ship through the

driving snow. He stumbles back up to his feet and struggles

a few more steps, then stumbles again, spent.

Finally, he sits down in the snow to die.

As his senses flicker in and out, he is struck with memories

of his boys, so vivid he reaches out for them, crawling

forward in the snow.

He stops, and laughs, remembering what Case told him about

what happens when humans die.

He struggles to his feet and stumbles a few more feet,

eventually coming to rest just steps from the ship.

Cooper takes a final step. Finally, he collapses under his

ship, as the wind continues to HOWL around him.

As the snow clears for a moment, Cooper is alone on a vast

arctic tundra. He will die alone.

BLACK:

FADE IN:

INT. HOSPITAL ROOM -- DAY

Cooper wakes.

He is in a sunlit room. A breeze rustles the curtains as it

makes its way in through a large open window.

Cooper sits up. As he a does, a control panel on the wall

TONES gently, as if in response to his movement.

He stands and looks around. He can see sunlight through the

open windows and hear people -- kids YELLING as they play.

He moves toward the window. Reaches for the curtains. Before

he can, the door opens behind him.

A WOMAN in a white coat steps in, smiling warmly.

DOCTOR:

Good morning. Don't go outside just

yet, Mr. Cooper.

(MORE)

146.

DOCTOR (CONT'D)

(offers him a pill)

This will help with the

disorientation.

Cooper opens his mouth to talk, but his voice is cracked.

He gives up. Swallows the pill.

DOCTOR (CONT'D)

Wait a minute for that to take effect.

It can be a bit of an adjustment.

(looks him over)

You had some frostbite. Nothing too

serious.

As she talks, Cooper looks past her to the window.

COOPER:

Where am I?

DOCTOR:

(SMILES)

It's a bit of a coincidence, really.

When the rangers found you, we were

the nearest facility.

COOPER:

What's coincidence? What is this

place?

DOCTOR:

We have a lot to show you.

The doctor reaches for the curtains. She offers him a hand.

Cooper declines the help and steps outside.

EXT. HOSPICE, COOPER STATION -- DAY

Cooper is standing on a rooftop deck of a four-story building

in a medium-sized city surrounded by fields. But as the

road and the buildings stretch into the distance, the

landscape curves up, not down.

The entire landscape is contained within a huge cylinder-

shaped space station.

Cooper stumbles, and reaches instinctively out. The doctor

catches him.

DOCTOR:

You're OK. We get this from people

who move here from planetary colonies

all the time.

147.

COOPER:

Where... where are we?

DOCTOR:

Like I said. It was a coincidence.

There was a facility closer to Earth,

but they had a problem, so you wound

up here.

(off his look)

This is the Space Station Joseph A.

Cooper.

Cooper takes in the incredible surroundings. A thousand

feet above them, black specks are sprinkled over an ocean of

green -- Jersey milking cows grazing in a field of wild grass.

DOCTOR (CONT'D)

I've got someone who wants to meet

you.

Cooper looks at her.

INT. INTENSIVE CARE ROOM, HOSPICE, COOPER STATION -- DAY

Cooper steps inside. The room is dark, still, the only noise

is the labored RATTLE of an old man struggling to breathe.

Cooper steps closer to the bed. The man's skin is paper-

thin. He is ancient.

DOCTOR:

He was moved here after they found

you. He's a little old for a

transfer, but they made an exception.

Cooper hovers at the back of the room, unsure. He turns to

the doctor, questioning. Then he notices the pictures on

the old man's desk:

There are dozens of them. Children, grandchildren. Then

the older ones -- the man's own parents. Grandparents.

Cooper spots a tiny framed picture with someone he recognizes:

Murph, 80 years old, surrounded by his daughter and her

family. They are standing in front of a re-opened Cape

Canaveral, and a huge spaceship under construction.

Cooper picks up the picture and stares at it.

The doctor points to a shy little boy hiding behind Murph's

leg in the picture.

DOCTOR (CONT'D)

That's him.

148.

She points to the old man lying in the bed.

DOCTOR (CONT'D)

His name is Anthony Welling. Anthony

Cooper Welling.

(SMILES)

He's your great great grandson.

He's been waiting a long time for

you.

Cooper's eyes well with tears. He steps over to the bed and

looks down at the ancient man, teetering on the edge of death.

The old man looks at him, eyes widening in excitement. He

strains, trying to reach the bedside table. He's trying to

reach the drawer. Cooper helps him open it.

Inside is a simple, familiar wristwatch. The old man

carefully takes out the watch. He gives the watch a few

winds and, hands shaking, offers it to Cooper.

Cooper, eyes filling with tears, closes his hand over the

old man's hand, enveloping both the watch and the man's hand.

CUT TO:

EXT. CORNFIELD, COOPER STATION -- MORNING

Cooper is sitting in a well-appointed office. A middle-aged

BUREAUCRAT smiles at him from the far side of a huge desk.

ADMINISTRATOR:

You're a hero, Mr. Cooper. Let's

just start off by saying that. It's

an incredible and... unexpected honor

to have you here with us.

Cooper smiles, uncomfortable.

ADMINISTRATOR (CONT'D)

None of us would be here without the

efforts of you and the other

crewmembers of the Endurance.

(smiles, unconvincingly)

So I don't want you to take this the

wrong way. But there are some

questions I've been told to ask.

The man looks petrified, like he's been instructed to grill

George Washington on his expense reports.

COOPER:

Shoot.

149.

ADMINISTRATOR:

The rangers who found you reported

that you had released a sample of an

alien life-form into the wild. Which

is, unfortunately, against

regulations.

COOPER:

It was last of its kind. Their planet

was destroyed.

The administrator cues up a series of images on his computer.

ADMINISTRATOR:

The rangers attempted to isolate the

life-form, but it had already spread

out of control. It seems to be

thriving.

He shows Cooper a satellite image of north america. A

considerable portion of the frozen tundra is glowing.

Cooper begins laughing. Which makes the administrator even

less comfortable.

ADMINISTRATOR (CONT'D)

Can you tell me why you... elected

to release the life-form back on

earth?

Cooper is still laughing.

COOPER:

Because that was the plan.

ADMINISTRATOR:

Whose plan?

COOPER:

(SMILES)

I don't know.

The administrator tries to smile back. Makes a few notes in

his file. Changes the subject.

ADMINISTRATOR:

My assistant tells me you've applied

for a position with the exploration

fleet.

COOPER:

Feel like I should be pulling my

weight.

150.

ADMINISTRATOR:

That's admirable, Mr. Cooper. The

truth is, most of the fleet's

personnel are automated. There are

a small number of crewed ships. But

there are great numbers of candidates.

Very well trained candidates.

COOPER:

I was hoping to enroll in a course.

Try to get myself up to speed on the

new systems.

ADMINISTRATOR:

I don't want you to take this the

wrong way, Mr. Cooper -- like I

said, you're a hero. But the truth

is we have somewhat limited resources.

Cooper remembers this conversation. He looks down.

COOPER:

No one's heard anything from Brand?

ADMINISTRATOR:

I'm sorry. Officially, she's been

listed as missing for over 200 years.

Mind you, I guess you turned up

eventually, didn't you?

COOPER:

Am I really going to hurt anybody by

going to look for her? I just need

a small ship. I made a promise.

The bureaucrat looks down. Is he really going to have to

tell this guy the lay of the land?

ADMINISTRATOR:

Listen. Mr. Cooper. You're a hero.

You're the oldest man in the human

race. Don't you want to take it

easy?

(off his look)

I hope you understand, we all you

hold you in the highest possible

regard.

(QUIET)

Which is why they're never going to

let you go off by yourself in a

spaceship. I'm sorry.

Cooper looks at his hands. He's got a couple centuries on

the bureaucrat in Earth years, but looks ten years younger.

He puts his hands in his pockets.

151.

ADMINISTRATOR (CONT'D)

I've got some good news, however.

(BIG SMILE)

We all know about your early life,

Mr Cooper. I wrote a paper on it

when I was a boy. And I think we

found something you'll really enjoy.

EXT. CORNFIELD, COOPER STATION -- DAY

Corn blows in an artificial breeze. A red tractor makes its

way through the field, which curves gently up in the distance.

ADMINISTRATOR (V.O.)

The machines do most of the work, of

course, but we were able to get you

a few acres. You're going to be a

farmer again.

After a moment, the tractor stops. Cooper climbs down from

the seat. Looks at the front steering linkage, which is

jammed with an errant tree branch. He wipes his forehead

and begins working the branch out of the machine.

He looks miserable.

A robot, a similar unit to Tars, walks over. Offers Cooper

a bottle of water. Cooper accepts it.

EXT. HANGAR BAY, COOPER STATION

Cooper stands on an observation deck, high above the hangar

floor. Below him, bright young things in uniforms climb

into sleek-looking spaceships and prepare to set out.

EXT. BASEBALL DIAMOND, COOPER STATION

Cooper sits in the stands, listening to the familiar crack

of the bat as an intramural team from the university

practices.

Cooper watches. He looks bored.

The kid up to bat cracks a pop fly. For a second, the catcher

shuffles back and forth, trying to get himself into position.

But the ball never returns. The catcher YELLS out a warning.

Above, the ball begins to slowly fall up, not down, toward

the town center above.

After a second, the ball smashes through a skylight of a

building high above them.

Cooper watches as the kid rounds the bases, laughing.

152.

INT. KITCHEN, FARMHOUSE, COOPER STATION -- DAY

Cooper's robot sits at the kitchen table. Cooper is fiddling

around in the back of his head.

ROBOT:

Settings:
general settings, security

SETTINGS--

COOPER:

Curiosity. New level setting. 100

percent.

ROBOT:

Confirmed. Would you like to make

any additional changes?

COOPER:

Sense of humor. New level setting.

100 percent. Wait.

(THINKS)

80 percent.

He begins putting the robot back together.

EXT. FARMHOUSE, COOPER STATION -- TWILIGHT

Cooper sits on his porch, joined by the same robot as before.

They watch as the space station rotates lazily out of

alignment with the local star, casting the inside of the

cylinder into shade, then darkness.

The shadow races past them. Another day. Another night.

EXT. HANGAR, COOPER STATION

A maintenance worker finishes looking over one of the sleek-

looking spacecraft. He packs up his tools and heads out.

After a moment, two figures pick their way across the hangar

floor, sticking to the shadows.

As they reach the first ship in the line, we get a better

look. It's Cooper and his robot pal. The robot is wearing

a baseball cap and carrying a toolbox.

Cooper gestures to the robot, who sets down the toolbox with

a click against the mirror-like floor.

Cooper shakes his head, annoyed, at the robot, and puts his

finger to his lips. The robot nods, bashful.

Cooper waves a small handheld computer near the skin of the

ship until it lights up. Then he punches in a few codes.

Nothing happens. He punches in a few more.

153.

Suddenly, the hatch opens with a HISS.

INT. SHIP

Cooper moves quickly to the cockpit of the ship. Looks over

the controls. The robot straps himself in next to him.

Cooper looks up through the windows.

The inky black void of space beckons.

Cooper smiles and reaches for the controls.

COOPER:

Where do you want to go first?

The robot thinks it over.

EXT. HANGAR, COOPER STATION

The technician walks back into the hangar. He walks along

the row of ships till he reaches the last one.

It's not there.

He looks out into the blackness of the void. Sees a tiny

glowing speck, getting smaller and smaller.

END:

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Christopher Nolan

Christopher Edward Nolan (born 30 July 1970) is an English-American film director, producer, and screenwriter. He is one of the highest-grossing directors in history, and among the most successful and acclaimed filmmakers of the 21st century. more…

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