Cross Creek

Synopsis: In 1930's Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings moves to Florida's backwaters to write in peace. She feels bothered by affectionate men, editor and confused neighbors, but soon she connects and writes The Yearling, a classic of American literature.
Director(s): Martin Ritt
Production: Universal
  Nominated for 4 Oscars. Another 2 wins & 3 nominations.
 
IMDB:
7.0
Rotten Tomatoes:
64%
PG
Year:
1983
127 min
29 Views

1

Marjorie:
My journey to maturity

began in New York in 1928.

I was married to Charles Rawlings,

a newspaper man and yachting enthusiast.

I had been trying to write stories

that I thought would be

most likely to sell.

Gothic romances were extremely popular,

and I had written dozens.

I was desperate to express myself.

Even as a child, I had been consumed

with a desire to be a writer.

[Ragtime music playing]

Man:
Car, please, Norris.

[People chattering]

Marjorie.

Max rejected my short story.

Max Perkins isn't the only editor

in the world.

I know.

I thought your story was damn good.

Except for the pretentious parts.

Let's take a ride upstate tomorrow.

We'll make a day of it?

It looks like I'm gonna have

a hangover tomorrow.

[Sighs]

I have arrangements to make, Charles.

What kind of arrangements?

I don't think we should discuss it here.

Why not?

Well, public scenes embarrass you.

You bought that damn orange grove.

What in hell possessed you

to buy a place sight unseen?

I wasn't consulted.

You didn't for one minute

think about me.

Oh, that's not true.

All you cared about

was you and your desire

to write the great American novel.

Do you seriously expect me to move

to some hick town and grow oranges?

Is this your vision of an artist?

I... I'm not a kid.

I can't just pick up and leave.

Why not?

Fine.

Take your typewriter

and go to Cross Creek.

Just don't expect me

to share in your simple life.

Charles...

You're my husband.

And I love you, Marjorie.

Couldn't you come with me?

No.

[Radiator hissing]

[Engine sputtering]

[Turns engine off]

[Hissing]

Marjorie:
After 30 years of urban life,

I was totally unprepared

for this small Florida town.

[Dog barking in distance]

[Birds chirping]

Excuse me,

uh, is there a taxi available?

You want the hotel.

Oh, thank you.

You want Norton Baskin.

Just ask for Norton, he'll help you out.

Thank you.

[Swing music playing on radio]

[Rings bell]

Mr. Baskin?

Mm-hmm.

I... I'm looking for a taxicab.

[Laughs]

I'm going to Cross Creek

and I need a ride there.

If you just could tell me

where I might find a taxi.

There's not much business here.

If you can wait a minute,

I'll run you down.

No.

It's too bad about your car.

You ain't gonna get her running again.

No, sir.

You gonna have to get yourself

another one.

Something in a clean blue might be nice.

I don't need a car.

Well, if you're partial to dirty blue.

No, I don't have any use for a car.

- Oh, I see.

- I like walking.

Ha. That's nice.

I intend to walk a lot.

Those your hiking shoes?

Heh.

You ain't gonna get too far in them.

I'll manage.

Baskin:
Up there is Simmons'

turpentine still.

And over that way is orange lake.

It's good fishing.

If you don't mind the gators.

So you say you're a writer?

What do you write?

I'm working on a novel.

Mm. Mm-hmm.

Hold on, now.

You all right?

I'm just fine.

Hmm.

So you write love stories?

I'm writing a Gothic.

You do say.

I don't believe

I know what that is.

It's a type of writing

a classic Gothic novel

has a castle as its setting,

and a governess or

a gentlewoman in distress.

Like you.

You won't be meeting

too many intellectuals out here.

It might get a little lonesome.

I've come here to work, not socialize.

Well, this is Cross Creek.

How many people live in Cross Creek?

Now, let's see...

There's never been more than...

Say, uh...

A dozen families.

You got to be a little crazy

to live out at the creek.

Ah, no offense, ma'am.

The way I look at it is,

if an attractive woman wants to hike

herself out into the middle of nowhere,

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"Cross Creek" Scripts.com. STANDS4 LLC, 2019. Web. 22 Sep. 2019. <https://www.scripts.com/script/cross_creek_6088>.

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