Carnage script
Carnage (2011)
Synopsis: Carnage is a 2011 black comedy-drama film directed by Roman Polanski, based on the Tony Award winning play God of Carnage by French playwright Yasmina Reza. The screenplay is by Reza and Polanski. The film is an international co-production of France, Germany, Poland, and Spain. It stars Jodie Foster, Kate Winslet, Christoph Waltz and John C. Reilly.

1 EXT. PLAYGROUND IN PARK - DAY 1

WIDE ANGLE VIEW:
A playground in Brooklyn. A winter sun

shines brightly. Stark trees and patchy grass.

A boy of about 10 years stands apart from a group of kids

his age.

In his hand he is holding a large piece of tree branch,

twirling it absently, with the thick end out, for his own

amusement.

Another boy, with the support of the group, starts shouting

abuse at him. Though the words aren’t audible, it’s clear

that things are getting tense.

A verbal exchange is followed by some threatening gestures

on both sides. One boy shoves, the other shoves back.

It’s all pretty unremarkable until the first boy,

practically reflexively, strikes the second with the branch.

The wounded child is doubled over, his face in his hands.

The others crowd around him.

The boy who hit him also starts to take a step toward the

group of children. He seems distraught.

2 INT. LONGSTREET APARTMENT - DEN - DAY 2

A narrow room converted to a home office. Winter light

filters through the only window.

On a table against one wall there are some periodicals -

topical magazines about contemporary history and UNESCO

publications. There are also some assorted papers, a school

notebook, a few baubles and a laptop computer.

PENELOPE LONGSTREET is seated at the computer.

Her husband, MICHAEL, is standing by amiably, leaning over

and already prepared for the words which are to follow.

Also standing there, but a couple of steps back, are ALAN

and NANCY COWAN. They are dressed in business clothes. She

must have put her coat down somewhere, he has his on his

arm. They both stare at the screen.

It is clear from the start that these two couples are not

close. The prevailing mood is serious, cordial and tolerant.

PENELOPE reads out loud the words written on the screen:

2.

PENELOPE:

“January 11, at 2:30 PM.”

(with a glance behind

her toward the

COWANS:
)

You’ll make your statement

separately, this is ours.

“...following a verbal dispute in

Brooklyn Bridge Park, Zachary Cowan,

age eleven and armed with a stick,

struck our son, Ethan Longstreet, in

the face. In addition to the

swelling and bruising of Ethan's

upper lip, this act also resulted in

two broken incisors, including nerve

damage to the right incisor."

ALAN:

Armed?

PENELOPE:

Armed. You don't like armed? Michael,

what could we say? Carrying? Holding?

Carrying a stick, is that all right?

ALAN:

Carrying, yeah.

MICHAEL:

Carrying a stick.

PENELOPE enters the correction on the laptop.

PENELOPE:

Carrying.

She prints the single page and hands it to NANCY COWAN.

PENELOPE (CONT'D)

It's ironic, we always thought the

Brooklyn Bridge Park was safe.

Compared to Hillside.

MICHAEL:

True.

Once the paper is in his wife’s hand, ALAN COWAN tries to

cut the meeting short, starts backing up toward the foyer.

They continue talking as all make their way progressively

toward the front door.

MICHAEL (CONT’D)

We always said, Brooklyn Bridge Park,

fine. Hillside, no way.

3.

PENELOPE:

Only goes to show you. But hey, thank

you for coming. It's so much better

than getting caught up in that

adversarial mindset.

NANCY:

Well we thank you. Really.

PENELOPE:

I don't think we have to thank each

other. At least some of us still have

a sense of community, right?

ALAN:

Though the kids haven't got that

notion straight yet. I mean our kid.

NANCY:

Right, our kid!

Nancy walks into the living room to retrieve her coat.

3 INT. LONGSTREET LIVING ROOM - DAY 3

The LONGSTREET’s living room is modest and homey. There’s

a partial view of the elevated subway. The furnishings

are improvised and disparate, with a few ethnic touches.

There is a large bookshelf.

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Yasmina Reza

Yasmina Reza (born 1 May 1959) is a French playwright, actress, novelist and screenwriter best known for her plays 'Art' and God of Carnage. Many of her brief satiric plays reflected on contemporary middle-class issues. more…

All Yasmina Reza scripts | Yasmina Reza Books

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"Carnage" Scripts.com. STANDS4 LLC, 2017. Web. 16 Dec. 2017. <http://www.scripts.com/script/carnage_212>.

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