Goodbye, Columbus

Synopsis: A Jewish man and a Jewish woman meet and while attracted to each other, find that their worlds are very different. She is the archtypical Jewish American Princess, very emotionally involved with her parents' world, and the world they have created for her, while he is much less dependent on his family. They begin an affair, which brings more differences to the surface.
Genre: Comedy, Drama, Romance
Director(s): Larry Peerce
Production: Paramount
  Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 4 wins & 8 nominations.
 
IMDB:
6.6
Rotten Tomatoes:
100%
R
Year:
1969
102 min
76 Views

Mrs. Elliot Tollger,

Mrs. Elliot Tollger, telephone.

Wilma Kay, Wilma Kay,

to the front desk, please.

Wilma Kay, Wilma Kay,

front desk, please.

- Would you hold my glasses?

- What?

- Would you mind holding my glasses?

- Sure.

- I told you not to put my glasses on.

- No, I don't care.

- Didn't I buy you your own?

- I don't like them!

- These are big for you.

- I don't like them!

Come on, I'm gonna tell your father.

Come on, Brenda, let's go.

We're late.

Coming.

Miss Robin Kellish, Miss Robin

Kellish, to the first tee, please.

Hey, hey, you forgot your glasses.

Brenda, come on.

I'm coming.

Mrs. Sidney Cohen,

Mrs. Sidney Cohen, telephone.

Hey, Doris, do you know her?

- Why?

- Doris, I give you my word,

I won't embarrass you, I promise.

If you call her up, so help me,

I will never ask you here again.

So help me. Never again!

- Hi, sweetie.

- The playboy from the country club.

- Oh, delicious, delicious.

- Don't put the towel on the furniture.

- Where's the phone book?

- Which one?

- The suburban phone book.

- Under the leg of the sideboard.

- Who are you calling?

- A girl I met today.

Oh, Doris introduced you?

She wouldn't introduce me

to the man who drains the pool.

Very nice, how you talk about

a cousin. Oh, look what time it is.

Your Uncle Max will be home soon,

and I didn't even feed you yet.

Aunt Gladys, why don't we

eat together for once.

Sure, I should serve

four different meals.

You eat Jewish pot roast,

Susan with the cottage cheese,

Uncle Max has steak. Friday night is

his steak night. I wouldn't deny him.

And all I'm having

is a little cold chicken.

So I should jump up and down,

up and down, up and down?

What am I, a workhorse?

This may come as a big surprise,

but in some families,

everybody sits down at the

same time and eats the same thing.

Big shot. Twenty years,

I'm running this house.

Is Brenda there?

Quiet, quiet, quiet.

Is Brenda there?

- Supper's ready.

- Coming.

When do you expect her in?

No, this is nobody.

- It's getting cold.

- In a moment. Come on.

There's no message. No, I'm sorry.

Come, sweetheart, eat.

Make sure you do that. Keep it

straight. This has got to be straight.

- Hello.

- Hi, honey.

- I thought you were driving golf balls.

- I drove them already.

OK? There you go.

Good girl. Now try it on your own.

- Thought you were driving golf balls.

- Already did.

- Having dinner with us?

- I'll eat later.

I'm meeting Simp for tennis.

Is that my phone or your phone

or Ron's phone?

- It's your phone.

- They all sound alike to me.

Hello.

Who's calling please?

Just a minute. Brenda.

- You know anybody named Klugman?

- Klugman?

Unless I didn't understand him right.

- Hello?

- Carlotta!

You don't know me.

That is, you don't know my name.

I held your glasses for you

at the club today. I'm not a member.

You asked me to. My cousin

Doris is. Doris Klugman?

- Doris?

- She always reads War and Peace.

That's how we know it's summer,

Doris reads War and Peace.

- What did you say your name is?

- Neil Klugman.

You asked me to hold

your glasses at the board, remember?

- What do you look like?

- Well, I'm kind of dark.

- Are you a Negro?

- No, I'm a Sagittarian.

- See how you like it.

- I'll do it.

What do you look like?

Listen, can I pick you up tonight

and show you?

- I'm playing tennis tonight.

- How about after tennis?

- I'll be sweaty after.

- I don't mind.

- Can I come see you tonight?

- OK.

Briarpath Hills. You know

where that is? Around 8:15.

I'll be driving a blue convertible so

you'll know me. How will I know you?

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Philip Roth

Philip Milton Roth (March 19, 1933 – May 22, 2018) was an American novelist and short-story writer. Roth's fiction, regularly set in his birthplace of Newark, New Jersey, is known for its intensely autobiographical character, for philosophically and formally blurring the distinction between reality and fiction, for its "sensual, ingenious style" and for its provocative explorations of American identity.Roth first gained attention with the 1959 novella Goodbye, Columbus, for which he received the U.S. National Book Award for Fiction. He became one of the most awarded American writers of his generation. His books twice received the National Book Award and the National Book Critics Circle award, and three times the PEN/Faulkner Award. He received a Pulitzer Prize for his 1997 novel American Pastoral, which featured one of his best-known characters, Nathan Zuckerman, a character in many of Roth's novels. The Human Stain (2000), another Zuckerman novel, was awarded the United Kingdom's WH Smith Literary Award for the best book of the year. In 2001, in Prague, Roth received the inaugural Franz Kafka Prize. more…

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Submitted on August 05, 2018

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"Goodbye, Columbus" Scripts.com. STANDS4 LLC, 2019. Web. 16 Oct. 2019. <https://www.scripts.com/script/goodbye%2C_columbus_9213>.

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