Funny Face

Synopsis: Fashion photographer Dick Avery, in search for an intellectual backdrop for an air-headed model, expropriates a Greenwich Village bookstore. When the photo session is over the store is left in a shambles, much to salesgirl Jo Stockton's dismay. Avery stays behind to help her clean up. Later, he examines the photos taken there and sees Jo in the background of one shot. He is intrigued by her unique appearance, as is Maggie Prescott, the editor of a leading fashion magazine. They offer Jo a modeling contract, which she reluctantly accepts only because it includes a trip to Paris. Eventually, her snobbish attitude toward the job softens, and Jo begins to enjoy the work and the company of her handsome photographer.
Director(s): Stanley Donen
Production: Paramount Pictures
  Nominated for 4 Oscars. Another 2 wins & 6 nominations.
 
IMDB:
7.1
Rotten Tomatoes:
88%
NOT RATED
Year:
1957
103 min
506 Views


We'll mention the shop

in the magazine.

Don't you dare!

(Miss Prescott) Taxi!

(bell jingles)

Oh, no!

Oh!

Hello there.

I stayed to help you

put these back.

I didn't realise we made such a mess.

Which shelf for materialism?

Just hand them to me.

Oh, no.

You should be ashamed of yourself.

We don't usually barge in that way.

I mean a man of your ability

wasting his time

photographing silly dresses

on silly women.

Most people think they're

beautiful dresses on beautiful women.

At most, a synthetic beauty.

Trees are beautiful.

Why don't you photograph trees?

I do what I do for a living.

It has to do with supply and demand.

You'd be amazed how small

the demand is for pictures of trees.

My work is pleasant,

the pay is excellent,

and I get a trip to Paris every year.

I certainly envy you that.

I'd be in Paris now

if I could afford it.

You'd have a ball.

You'd go to a party every night,

drink champagne,

swim in perfume, and a new love

affair every hour on the hour.

If I went to Paris, it would be

to go to Emile Flostre's lectures.

Who goes to Paris for lectures?

Professor Flostre

is the greatest living philosopher,

and father of empathicalism.

Oh? What's empathicalism?

The most sensible approach to

true understanding and peace of mind.

Sounds great, but what is it?

It's based on empathy.

Do you know

what the word ''empathy'' means?

No, I'll have to have

the beginner's course on that one.

Empathy.

Is it something like sympathy?

Oh, it goes beyond sympathy.

Sympathy

is to understand what someone feels.

Empathy

is to project your imagination

so that you actually feel

what the other person is feeling.

You put yourself

in the other person's place.

Do I make myself clear?

- Why did you do that?

Rate this script:(0.00 / 0 votes)

Leonard Gershe

Leonard Gershe (June 10, 1922 - March 9, 2002) was an American playwright, screenwriter, and lyricist. Born in New York City, Gershe made his Broadway debut as a lyricist for the 1950 revue Alive and Kicking. He wrote the book for Harold Rome's musical stage adaptation of Destry Rides Again in 1959, and in 1969 a play, Butterflies are Free. Later Gershe wrote another play, Snacks, intended for Tony Danza. He wrote the lyrics for the "Born in a Trunk" sequence from the Judy Garland/James Mason musical A Star Is Born. In the 1950s, Gershe wrote ten scripts for the Ann Sothern sitcom Private Secretary. He also wrote a number of episodes of The Lucy Show. His screen credits include Funny Face, 40 Carats, and Butterflies Are Free. According to World of Wonder Gershe had a long-term relationship with composer Roger Edens.Gershe died in Beverly Hills, California from complications from a stroke. more…

All Leonard Gershe scripts | Leonard Gershe Scripts

FAVORITE (0 fans)

Submitted on August 05, 2018

Discuss this script with the community:

0 Comments

    Translation

    Translate and read this script in other languages:

    Select another language:

    • - Select -
    • 简体中文 (Chinese - Simplified)
    • 繁體中文 (Chinese - Traditional)
    • Español (Spanish)
    • Esperanto (Esperanto)
    • 日本語 (Japanese)
    • Português (Portuguese)
    • Deutsch (German)
    • العربية (Arabic)
    • Français (French)
    • Русский (Russian)
    • ಕನ್ನಡ (Kannada)
    • 한국어 (Korean)
    • עברית (Hebrew)
    • Gaeilge (Irish)
    • Українська (Ukrainian)
    • اردو (Urdu)
    • Magyar (Hungarian)
    • मानक हिन्दी (Hindi)
    • Indonesia (Indonesian)
    • Italiano (Italian)
    • தமிழ் (Tamil)
    • Türkçe (Turkish)
    • తెలుగు (Telugu)
    • ภาษาไทย (Thai)
    • Tiếng Việt (Vietnamese)
    • Čeština (Czech)
    • Polski (Polish)
    • Bahasa Indonesia (Indonesian)
    • Românește (Romanian)
    • Nederlands (Dutch)
    • Ελληνικά (Greek)
    • Latinum (Latin)
    • Svenska (Swedish)
    • Dansk (Danish)
    • Suomi (Finnish)
    • فارسی (Persian)
    • ייִדיש (Yiddish)
    • հայերեն (Armenian)
    • Norsk (Norwegian)
    • English (English)

    Citation

    Use the citation below to add this screenplay to your bibliography:

    Style:MLAChicagoAPA

    "Funny Face" Scripts.com. STANDS4 LLC, 2021. Web. 18 Apr. 2021. <https://www.scripts.com/script/funny_face_8695>.

    We need you!

    Help us build the largest writers community and scripts collection on the web!

    The Marketplace:

    Sell your Script !

    Get listed in the most prominent screenplays collection on the web!


    Browse Scripts.com

    The Studio:

    ScreenWriting Tool

    Write your screenplay and focus on the story with many helpful features.


    Scripts.com

    Thanks for your vote! We truly appreciate your support.