You Ain't Seen Nothin' Yet

Synopsis: From beyond the grave, celebrated playwright Antoine d'Anthac gathers together all his friends who have appeared over the years in his play "Eurydice." These actors watch a recording of the work performed by a young acting company, La Compagnie de la Colombe. Do love, life, death and love after death still have any place on a theater stage? It's up to them to decide. And the surprises have only just begun...
Genre: Comedy, Drama
Director(s): Alain Resnais
Production: Kino Lorber
  1 nomination.
 
IMDB:
6.3
Metacritic:
69
Rotten Tomatoes:
84%
Year:
2012
115 min
$9,494
Website
10 Views

YOU AIN'T SEEN NOTHIN' YET!

Hello?

- Hello?

- Yes?

- Lambert Wilson?

- Yes, speaking.

I'm calling

with some unpleasant news.

What's happened?

Your friend Antoine d'Anthac

has just died.

It can't be true...

Before his death, he left

some very precise instructions.

He asks you to travel urgently

to his house in Peillon

to attend the reading of his will

and the funeral ceremony

that will follow.

I'm sure you'll respect

his last wishes.

- Hello? Pierre Arditi?

- Yes, speaking.

I'm calling

with some unpleasant news.

Your friend Antoine d'Anthac

has just died.

Hello? Anne Consigny?

Yes, speaking.

I'm calling

with some unpleasant news.

Your friend Antoine d'Anthac

has just died.

Hello? Mathieu Amalric?

Yes, speaking.

I'm calling

with some unpleasant news.

Hello? Anny Duperey?

Yes, speaking.

I'm calling

with some unpleasant news.

Hello? Michel Piccoli?

Yes, speaking.

I'm calling

with some unpleasant news.

Hello? Michel Vuillermoz?

I'm calling

with some unpleasant news.

Your friend Antoine d'Anthac

has just died.

Hello? Hippolyte Girardot?

Speaking.

Hello? Jean-Nol Brout?

Yes, speaking.

I'm calling

with some unpleasant news.

Hello? Michel Robin?

I'm calling

with some unpleasant news.

Hello? Grard Lartigau?

I'm calling

with some unpleasant news.

Hello?

Jean-Chrtien Sibertin-Blanc?

Yes, speaking.

I'm calling

with some unpleasant news.

Hello? Sabine Azma?

I'm calling

with some unpleasant news.

Your friend Antoine d'Anthac

has just died.

Before his death, he left

some very precise instructions.

He asks you to travel urgently

to his house in Peillon

to attend the reading of his will

and the funeral ceremony

that will follow.

I'm sure you'll respect

his last wishes.

Yes.

Antoine has always had

wonderful homes.

He couldn't help himself.

If he liked a place,

he had to buy a house there.

With age, it only got worse.

He ended up thinking

that buying a new house

was likely to solve every problem.

Taste was the only area

where one could trust Antoine entirely.

Antoine's system

and that of his buildings

was based on total

compartmentalization.

When,

after a few unhappy love affairs

that left him the owner

of a mansion in Versailles,

a castle in the Prigord,

a villa in Cannes

and, more originally,

a houseboat on the Seine,

he finally settled on that young woman

25 years his junior,

he felt a sudden need for altitude.

When that young person

left him last year,

the spring must have gone

out of his life.

He saw no need to buy a new place

for the lonely months he had left.

Poor Antoine!

I wept every tear in my body

when I heard.

My eyes are dry

for the rest of my life.

Sabine!

What an extraordinary house!

It's so like him.

Poor Antoine...

Cleaning his hunting rifle,

all alone, at five in the morning,

in the rising sun.

He knew guns well.

Personally, I have no doubt

that it was an accident.

The only thing that shocked me

were the strict orders that he left

for the staff and myself:

Not to let anyone know,

bury him first,

then call Paris afterwards.

Azma's going to yell at me...

Piccoli!

They called you too?

What happened?

How are you?

Like a true master of ceremonies,

the butler assigned rooms

and served refreshments.

He then asked them to go

to the living room.

We sit anywhere?

I'll sit here.

You take a dog.

Cut off its head and tail

and you have a little bench.

What are you talking about?

Take a dog, cut off its head and tail

and you have a little bench.

Once they had crossed the bridge,

the ghosts came to meet them.

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Alain Resnais

Alain Resnais (French: [alɛ̃ ʁɛnɛ]; 3 June 1922 – 1 March 2014) was a French film director and screenwriter whose career extended over more than six decades. After training as a film editor in the mid-1940s, he went on to direct a number of short films which included Night and Fog (1956), an influential documentary about the Nazi concentration camps.Resnais began making feature films in the late 1950s and consolidated his early reputation with Hiroshima mon amour (1959), Last Year at Marienbad (1961), and Muriel (1963), all of which adopted unconventional narrative techniques to deal with themes of troubled memory and the imagined past. These films were contemporary with, and associated with, the French New Wave (la nouvelle vague), though Resnais did not regard himself as being fully part of that movement. He had closer links to the "Left Bank" group of authors and filmmakers who shared a commitment to modernism and an interest in left-wing politics. He also established a regular practice of working on his films in collaboration with writers previously unconnected with the cinema such as Jean Cayrol, Marguerite Duras, Alain Robbe-Grillet, Jorge Semprún and Jacques Sternberg.In later films, Resnais moved away from the overtly political topics of some previous works and developed his interests in an interaction between cinema and other cultural forms, including theatre, music, and comic books. This led to imaginative adaptations of plays by Alan Ayckbourn, Henri Bernstein and Jean Anouilh, as well as films featuring various kinds of popular song. His films frequently explore the relationship between consciousness, memory, and the imagination, and he was noted for devising innovative formal structures for his narratives. Throughout his career, he won many awards from international film festivals and academies. more…

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Submitted on August 05, 2018

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