The Seventh Veil

Synopsis: One dark summer night, Francesca Cunningham, a once world famed pianist, escapes from her hospital room and tries to commit suicide by jumping off a local bridge. She is rescued and taken back to the hospital and undergoes psychological treatment by Dr. Larsen. Larsen, desperately wants to know the events and persons who drove her to this state and help her. He makes Francesca talk about her past - a past with a controlling guardian, Nicholas, no friends, kept apart from the man she loved and forced to practice the piano 5-6 hours a day.
Genre: Drama, Music
Director(s): Compton Bennett
  Won 1 Oscar. Another 1 nomination.
 
IMDB:
7.0
APPROVED
Year:
1945
94 min
15 Views


- Thank you. Some place we can talk?

- This way.

- She never attempted suicide before?

- No, never.

I see.

What is about the patient?

She is one concert pianist. I heard her playing for several times.

- She does not speak at all. If you question her?

- She doesn't answer. One will think she didn't hear if one doesn't know what she does

She would talk to me. I should like to

exame her under hypnosis.

- Rather she is not cooperating under narcosis.

- And you really thinking it will help?

It may do. At least it'll tell us the nature of the injury to her mind.

I know you fellows get remarkable results but I can't say I altogether like it.

It seems a little prying. You see what I mean.

Dr. Kendall. The surgeon doesn't operate without first taking off the patient's cloth. Or nor do we with the mind.

You know what the staple says:the human mind is like Salome at begining of her dance.

Hiden from the outside world by seven veils, veils of preserve, shyness, fear, that was friends.

The average person will drop first one veil, then another, maybe three or four together.

With a lover, she would take fiveth, or even sixth, but never the seventh.

Never, you see. The human mind likes to cover its nakeness too to itself to keep its privicy.

Salome drops some of hers but you never get a human mind to do that.

And that's why I used narcosis.

Five minitues on the narcosis and down to the seventh veil. Then we can see what is acturally going on behind.

Then we can really help.

I'll be back tommorrow at 3 o'clock. You have the patient ready please, goodbye Dr. Kendall.

- Well, how is the patient today?

- Just the same, doctor.

I would like to prepare an injection. It's just to put her sleep the first time.

Better on when she is cooperating then she should be able to get along without it.

I should start soon as you're ready.

Good afternoon. Miss Cunningham. My name is Larsen. I trust you sleep well?

Oh, you didn't. That is a pity, a great pity.

When one doesn't sleep, one isn't very happy.

Never mind, never mind.

We should give you a little sleep now.

I want you to breath deeply..

Now we have a little sleep, you are very tired, you like to go to sleep.

Relax now... that's right.. relax and close your eyes, gently, very slowly...

You're so tired, so terriblly tired, so lazy, and you want to go to sleep.

It's so nice to relax.. so nice to go to sleep, that's right, soon you would be asleep...

There, you are asleep.

Nothing can hurt you now because you're asleep, you understand, don't you? Nod your head if you do.

you can do what you like. And you can go where you please.

What would you like to do?Where would you like to go?

Would you like to go back to school?You were happy when you are little girl, weren't you?

Would you like to go back and happy again?

- School.

- Yes?

- School.

- Yes, tell me about it.

- School.

- listen, you are 14 years age now.

- How old are you?

- I am 14.

- You are 14.And you are in school.

- School.

Oh god, it is getting away mind.

Oh, look, it is escaping. Look out, you'll fall.

- How many?

- Six.

- No, seven.

- We can keep them.

Under the bed.

- She won't.

- Why?She is frightened to look under the bed.

- She is, I telling you

- Why?- Cause there is a man of course. -Susan, you're dreadful.

Susan, listen.

The bell. It's time to check already.

- So what?

- We must hurry, susan, we're terribly late.

What's the good if we take

at least ten minutes to come back, then we got to change.

- I mustn't, I mustn't be late.

- Why not, Miss will only give you a black mark.

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Muriel Box

Muriel Box (22 September 1905 – 18 May 1991) was an English screenwriter and director.She was born Violette Muriel Baker in Tolworth, Surrey, England in 1905. When her attempts at acting and dancing proved to be unsuccessful, she accepted work as a continuity girl for British International Pictures. In 1935, she met and married journalist Sydney Box, with whom she collaborated on nearly forty plays with mainly female roles for amateur theatre groups. Their production company, Verity Films, first released short wartime propaganda films, including The English Inn (1941), her first directing effort, after which it branched into fiction. The couple achieved their greatest joint success with The Seventh Veil (1945) for which they gained the Academy Award for Best Writing, Original Screenplay in the following year.After the war, the Rank Organisation hired her husband to head Gainsborough Pictures, where she was in charge of the scenario department, writing scripts for a number of light comedies, including two for child star Petula Clark, Easy Money and Here Come the Huggetts (both 1948). She occasionally assisted as a dialogue director, or re-shot scenes during post-production. Her extensive work on The Lost People (1949) gained her a credit as co-director, her first for a full-length feature.In 1951, her husband created London Independent Producers, allowing Box more opportunities to direct. Many of her early films were adaptations of plays, and as such felt stage-bound. They were noteworthy more for their strong performances than they were for a distinctive directorial style. She favoured scripts with topical and frequently controversial themes, including Irish politics, teenage sex, abortion, illegitimacy, and syphilis, and several of her films were banned by local authorities.She pursued her favourite subject – the female experience – in a number of films, including Street Corner (1953) about women police officers, Somerset Maugham's The Beachcomber (1954), with Donald Sinden and Glynis Johns as a resourceful missionary, again working with Donald Sinden on Eyewitness (1956) and a series of comedies about the battle of the sexes, including The Passionate Stranger (1957), The Truth About Women (1958) and her final film, Rattle of a Simple Man (1964).Box often experienced prejudice in a male-dominated industry, especially hurtful when perpetrated by another woman. Star Jean Simmons had her replaced on So Long at the Fair (1950), and Kay Kendall unsuccessfully attempted to do the same with Simon and Laura (1955). Many producers questioned her competence to direct large-scale feature films, and while the press was quick to note her position as one of very few women directors in the British film industry, their tone tended to be condescending rather than filled with praise.She left film-making to write novels and created a successful publishing house, Femina, which proved to be a rewarding outlet for her feminism. She divorced Sydney Box in 1969. The following year, she married Gerald Gardiner, who had been Lord Chancellor. She died in Hendon, London in 1991. more…

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Submitted on August 05, 2018

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"The Seventh Veil" Scripts.com. STANDS4 LLC, 2020. Web. 13 Aug. 2020. <https://www.scripts.com/script/the_seventh_veil_21288>.

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