The Pixar Story

Synopsis: A look at the first years of Pixar Animation Studios - from the success of "Toy Story" and Pixar's promotion of talented people, to the building of its East Bay campus, the company's relationship with Disney, and its remarkable initial string of eight hits. The contributions of John Lasseter, Ed Catmull and Steve Jobs are profiled. The decline of two-dimensional animation is chronicled as three-dimensional animation rises. Hard work and creativity seem to share the screen in equal proportions.
Genre: Documentary
Director(s): Leslie Iwerks
Production: Walt Disney Pictures
  Nominated for 1 Primetime Emmy. Another 1 nomination.
 
IMDB:
7.9
Rotten Tomatoes:
86%
G
Year:
2007
87 min
93 Views

(WHISTLING)

(THUNDER CLAPPING)

(WIND HOWLING)

And make a wish. . .

But you'll be hurt. You'll be killed!

John Henry's dead!

(TRAIN WHISTLE BLOWING)

ELMER FUDD:
That was the wabbit.

Fifteen puppies!

To infinity and beyond!

NARRATOR:
For the last 20 years,

a group of artists and scientists

have transformed

two-dimensional drawings

into their own

three-dimensional worlds.

BOO:
Kitty!

SULLEY:
Boo!

CELIA:
Oh, Googly Bear.

SYNDROME:
It's Syndrome.

MR. INCREDIBLE:
Show time!

DORY:
Just keep swimming.

Just keep swimming. Whee!

MARLIN:
Dory!

DORY:
Gotta go faster

if you wanna win!

JESSlE:
Yee-haw!

WOODY:
(GASPS) Ride like the wind,

Bullseye!

(HORSE GALLOPING)

JOHN LASSETER:
The art challenges

technology,

technology inspires the art.

STEVE JOBS:
The best scientists

and engineers

are just as creative

as the best storytellers.

ED CATMULL:
We've got characters

that we want to come alive.

NARRATOR:
Transforming the

hand-drawn line

into a new art form was no easy task.

Over the last 20 years,

these artists faced struggles

and the risk of failure

every step of the way.

This marriage of art and science was

the combined dream of three men,

a creative scientist, Ed Catmull,

a visionary entrepreneur, Steve Jobs,

and a talented artist, John Lasseter.

Together they have

revolutionized an industry

and blazed an unprecedented record

in Hollywood history.

This is The Pixar Story.

LASSETER:
Ford's has a bullet nose.

NARRATOR:
The creative force

behind Pixar Studios

and the director

of Toy Story , John Lasseter,

helped pioneer this new art form

from an early love

of bringing drawings to life.

LASSETER:
When I was growing up,

I loved cartoons

more than anything else.

And when I was in high school,

I found this book, this old, ratty book,

called The Art of Animation.

And it was about the Disney Studios

and how they made animated films.

And it was one of those things,

that it just dawned on me,

people make cartoons for a living.

They actually get paid

to make cartoons.

And I thought,

"That's what I wanna do."

Right then, right there, it was like

I knew that's what I wanted to do.

NARRATOR:
In 1975, John applied

to CalArts,

an art college founded

by Walt Disney in 1961 .

John was accepted

into the first program

that taught Disney-style

character animation.

LASSETER:
What they were doing

is bringing out of retirement

all of these amazing Disney artists

to teach this class,

to get this program started.

It dawned on me pretty quickly

how special this was.

NARRATOR:
Among John's classmates

were future

directors Tim Burton, John Musker

and Brad Bird.

Everyone was kind of

on fire about animation.

We didn't wanna leave it

at the end of the day.

And none of us had cars,

so, we were kind of stuck there.

When the teachers went home,

we taught ourselves.

MUSKER:
It was a very collaborative

spirit at CalArts.

Everybody showed everybody their film

and everybody

was kind of their own director.

But it was totally supportive

and you'd get creative ideas

from the other people.

And we all learned as much

from each other

as we did from the instructors.

NARRATOR:
The teachers at CalArts

were none other

than Disney's legendary collaborators

from the 1930s,

known as the "Nine Old Men,"

who taught the essence

of great character animation.

FRANK THOMAS:

We call it the warmth.

We call it

the inner feelings of the character.

It all comes back to their heart,

and then how they think about it.

And all those things.

How does a character feel,

and why does he feel that way?

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Leslie Iwerks

Leslie Iwerks () (born 1970) is an American producer, director, and writer. She is daughter of Disney Legend Don Iwerks and granddaughter of Ub Iwerks, the animator and co-creator of Mickey Mouse and Oswald the Lucky Rabbit. She has directed films including Recycled Life which was nominated for an Academy Award and The Pixar Story which was nominated for an Emmy for best nonfiction special.She is a member of the Documentary Branch of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences, and the International Documentary Association. She has worked with non-profit organizations Save Our Seas, Safe Passage, NRDC, and Sierra Club to raise awareness on matters affecting the globe. She currently helms Santa Monica-based production company Iwerks & Co. more…

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Submitted on August 05, 2018

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"The Pixar Story" Scripts.com. STANDS4 LLC, 2019. Web. 13 Nov. 2019. <https://www.scripts.com/script/the_pixar_story_15938>.

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