The Leopard Man script
Synopsis: The Leopard Man is a 1943 horror film directed by Jacques Tourneur based on the book Black Alibi by Cornell Woolrich. It is one of the first American films to attempt an even remotely realistic portrayal of a serial killer (although that term was yet to be used).

FADE IN:

On the fountain at El Pueblo. A jet of waiter rises into the

air at regular intervals, tossing an empty ball in rhythm.

Below the ball, the water cascades into the second tier of

the fountain. SUPERIMPOSED over this fountain are the main

and credit titles. Throughout the running of the titles we

hear castanet music growing louder and louder. When the last

credit title FADE OFF we begin to

DISSOLVE:

The corridor, backstage at El Pueblo. An empty corridor

stretches away before us. The CAMERA TRUCKS ALONG this

corridor. The sound of the castanets is so loud and ringing

now that it has a furious and stormlike quality. The camera

seems to search for the source of this sound. It approaches

two open doorways at the end of the corridor.

Through the doorway on the right we see a dancer in Spanish

costume. She pirouettes in a final whirl of the dance as the

CAMERA MOVES IN TO a CLOSE SHOT of her beautiful back and the

two castanets she holds up over her gleaming naked shoulders.

Over the diminishing trill of the castanets, as the dancer

finishes her dance we hear a dull and angry pounding. The

castanets click to an end.

The CAMERA MOVES LEFT to take in the adjoining door to show

us the source of this sound.

INT. KIKI WALKER'S DRESSING ROOM - NIGHT

Kiki Walker as she finishes pounding on the wall for silence

in the adjoining dressing room and turns back into her own

room. She is young, blonde and represents that peculiar

phenomenon of our time, the chorus girl and entertainer who

is more lady-like than the majority of Junior Leaguers. Road

shows, one night stands and even a short turn in burlesque

have left no battle scars. She may know many a hard word, but

she never uses it.

MED. SHOT - Kiki's room. Kiki slams shut the door of her

dressing room. Her dressing room is a small bare cubicle with

a sink, easy chair, dressing table and a long mirror on the

closet door. On the dressing table, among a clutter of jars

and ointments, is a small musical trinket box. The closet

door is partially ajar.

In the room with Kiki is Eloise, the cigarette girl at the El

Pueblo, a brightly blondined young lady. Her nether limbs are

well display in black stockings. A cigarette tray is slung

over her shoulder.

KIKI:

(as she walks

across the

room)

It may sound like music to her

-- I can do better with my teeth in

a cold Shower.

(mockingly)

Click � click � click.

ELOISE:

(shrugging)

She's a local. When the dudes come

out to New Mexico, they went to

wallow in Latin glamour. This is a

bad town for blondes.

KIKI:

Yes. So I've noticed. Jerry's

noticed -� He'll come up with

something.

ELOISE:

You think be's pretty nice, don't

you?

KIKI:

Why not? He's a good press agent

and a good friend. Besides, we've

shared a lot of headaches ��

ELOISE:

You're lucky. I wish he'd front

page for me.

KIKI:

Maybe. For three years I've sung in

rats' nests, while Jerry pounded

his feet off and his brains out --

trying to get me a real chance.

We're due for a little luck!

Kiki walks across to the make-up table and sits down in front

of it, lifting her hands to unwrap the towel which is wrapped

around her head to protect it from make-up. Eloise starts

toward the door, but pauses to admire herself in the mirror,.

ELOISE:

I don't mean this personally, Miss

Walker, but it's ironic �-

She pauses, striking a pose the better to look at her own

sleek legs in the minor.

ELOISE:

I mean you being a star and me

being just a cigarette girl.

KIKI:

(turning from

(the mirror to

look at Eloise)

I know. I know. You've got the

talent. I got the breaks.

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Ardel Wray

Ardel Wray (October 28, 1907 – October 14, 1983) was an American screenwriter and story editor, best known for her work on Val Lewton’s classic horror films in the 1940s. Her screenplay credits from that era include I Walked with a Zombie, The Leopard Man and Isle of the Dead. In a late second career in television, she worked as a story editor and writer at Warner Bros. on 77 Sunset Strip, The Roaring 20s, and The Travels of Jaimie McPheeters. Wray died at the age of 75 in Los Angeles. more…

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"The Leopard Man" Scripts.com. STANDS4 LLC, 2017. Web. 14 Dec. 2017. <http://www.scripts.com/script/the_leopard_man_896>.

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