The Last Sunset

Synopsis: Brendan O'Malley arrives at the Mexican home of old flame Belle Breckenridge to find her married to a drunkard getting ready for a cattle drive to Texas. Hot on O'Malley's heels is lawman Dana Stribling who has a personal reason for getting him back into his jurisdiction. Both men join Breckenridge and his wife on the drive. As they near Texas tensions mount, not least because Stribling is starting to court Belle and O'Malley is increasingly drawn by her daughter Missy.
Director(s): Robert Aldrich
Production: Universal Pictures
  1 nomination.
 
IMDB:
6.8
APPROVED
Year:
1961
112 min
23 Views

I need some

horseshoe nails.

Well, I have all sizes.

Some new and

some old. Select.

How much are they?

I'm looking for a man

named O'Malley.

Fellow about your height, wears

black pants and shirt, black boots.

Carries a derringer.

He always wears a loud-colored

scarf around his neck.

Has a hole in his chin.

Here.

It's worth 50 pesos

if anybody's seen him.

They are desolate

they cannot help you.

But, 50 pesos, seor? This man

must be a very dear friend, no?

No.

Jack-boy!

You be quiet.

Good evening.

Good evening.

The name's O'Malley.

How do you do, Mr. O'Malley?

I'm Mrs. John Breckenridge.

My husband's gone to

Calvillo on business.

Sorry to hear that. I was hoping to

ask him for a night's hospitality.

Mr. Breckenridge has always

welcomed strangers to the plateau.

I'm grateful to

Mr. Breckenridge.

Won't anybody take care

of the gentleman's horse?

Mr. O'Malley,

this is Milton Wing,

Mr. Breckenridge's

ranch manager.

Howdy.

This horse's been

lathered up some.

Well, I'd say that's because

he was run some, wouldn't you?

Guess so.

This is Jose. Rosario.

My daughter.

Oh.

She favors you.

You're a lucky young lady.

This is Melissa Linda Anthony

Breckenridge. We call her Melissa.

Well, how do you do,

Melissa?

Oh.

Thank you.

Well, I'd be most grateful to

Mr. Breckenridge for my supper.

Are you a cowboy,

Mr. O'Malley?

What have I done

to give you that idea?

You don't dress like one,

so I just wondered.

No, I don't like

cows much.

And the only way I really like

a horse is when he's hitched

to a nice two-seater buggy

with good springs.

I ran into a cowboy this

morning up at the pass.

Seemed to be looking

for somebody.

Tall man?

Sure was.

I never really met

an American cowboy.

You'd be disappointed.

Was he riding a blue roan?

That's right.

What makes you think

I'd be disappointed?

Well, you see, cowboys

aren't very bright.

They're always broke

and generally they're drunk.

Did he carry his

gun on the left?

Yep... 45 on the left.

You may get the chance to meet

one in the flesh real soon.

You know this fellow?

I know of him. We've

never met, but we will.

Mrs. Breckenridge, will you

do me the honor of dancing?

No.

I dance vary rarely, Mr. O'Malley.

And then only with my husband.

He's to be envied.

Then dance with me, Mr.

O'Malley. I love to dance.

I'd be delighted.

Do you want to try it again? Sure...

It's time for bed, Melissa.

Oh, no, not yet.

Yes. Gracias, muchachos.

Are you going to sleep in

the house, Mr. O'Malley?

You know Mr. Breckenridge has a special

room in the toolhouse for guests.

Oh, well. Good night.

Good night.

I'll show him.

Never mind,

I'll show him myself.

Here's your lamp.

Your bed's up there.

Why did you

have to come back?

I ran into somebody who told me

your married name and where you were.

I started riding

that same day.

You're lying.

You came here to hide.

There's someone on my trail,

sure. There always is.

But I haven't been running away from

him, I've just been coming to you.

And now I'm here.

And I'm not hiding.

And I'm going to stay.

No, Bren.

You're leaving tomorrow

and you're not coming back.

Belle.

I can't leave you now.

I never did

leave you, really.

All these years I've remembered

you as you were that night.

A pretty girl coming down

the steps in a yellow dress.

And another boy

asked me to dance.

You began that awful whistle

and just watched for a minute.

Then you tore my flowers off

and knocked him down.

I know, but that's all in the

past. That part of me is over.

It took three men to stop

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Dalton Trumbo

James Dalton Trumbo (December 9, 1905 – September 10, 1976) was an American screenwriter and novelist who scripted many award-winning films including Roman Holiday, Exodus, Spartacus, and Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo. One of the Hollywood Ten, he refused to testify before the House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC) in 1947 during the committee's investigation of communist influences in the motion picture industry. He, along with the other members of the Hollywood Ten and hundreds of other industry professionals, was subsequently blacklisted by that industry. His talents as one of the top screenwriters allowed him to continue working clandestinely, producing work under other authors' names or pseudonyms. His uncredited work won two Academy Awards: for Roman Holiday (1953), which was given to a front writer, and for The Brave One (1956) which was awarded to a pseudonym of Trumbo's. When he was given public screen credit for both Exodus and Spartacus in 1960, this marked the beginning of the end of the Hollywood Blacklist for Trumbo and other screenwriters. He finally was given full credit by the Writers' Guild for all his achievements, the work of which encompassed six decades of screenwriting. more…

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Submitted on August 05, 2018

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"The Last Sunset" Scripts.com. STANDS4 LLC, 2019. Web. 16 Oct. 2019. <https://www.scripts.com/script/the_last_sunset_12292>.

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