The Good Guys and the Bad Guys

Synopsis: Marshal Flagg, an aging lawman about to be retired, hears that his old nemesis, the outlaw McKaye, is back in the area and planning a robbery. Riding out to hunt down McKaye, Flagg is captured by McKaye's gang and finds out that McKaye is no longer the leader of the gang, but is considered just an aging relic by the new leader, a youngster named Waco. Waco orders Mackaye to shoot Flagg, and when Mackaye refuses Waco abandons both of them. Flagg then takes Mackaye back to town only to find out that he has been "retired", and when he sees how clueless and incompetent the new marshal and the city fathers are, he persuades Mackaye that it is up to the two of them to stop Waco and his gang from ravaging the town.
Genre: Comedy, Western
Director(s): Burt Kennedy
Production: Warner Bros.
 
IMDB:
6.2
Rotten Tomatoes:
20%
M
Year:
1969
91 min
4 Views

Our story tells of a man grown old

His blood's still warm

but his heart's grown cold

He thinks he's still the man he was

But the young poke fun at everything

Everything the old man does

Marshal Flagg, Marshal Flagg

As men grow old their footsteps drag

Younger folks start making jokes

They'll be laughing at Marshal Flagg

They'll be laughing at Marshal Flagg

Laughing

Laughing

At Marshal Flagg

A man recalls all his youthful days

When he tasted life in a million ways

He dreams his dreams, at times it seems

That he's only two times ten

That he's full of fire again

The man he was way back when

Marshal Flagg, Marshal Flagg

As men grow old their footsteps drag

Younger folks start making jokes

They'll be laughing at Marshal Flagg

They'll be laughing at Marshal Flagg

Laughing

Laughing

At Marshal Flagg

Damn red-headed chicken thief!

Blow his stealing head off.

Damn fox ate another one

of my hens this morning.

Consarned thieving...

Well, get down off of there.

Come have a snort.

- Nippy, huh?

- Nippy, hell!

I damn near froze last night.

- Why didn't you sleep inside?

- Walls and roofs is for city folks.

- Well, then why did you build it?

- Never built nothing like it before.

Grundy, either your coffee

or your liquor's getting awful rancid.

- Chaw?

- No, no.

- So what no-good you been up to?

- Just the usual.

- I saw some...

- What?

- Saw some...

- Grundy, will you please spit?

Saw some men yesterday.

Down by the flats.

- Who were they?

- Never seen them before.

- What'd they look like?

- Mean.

- What do you mean "mean"?

- Just mean. Ornery.

Well, what were they doing?

How many of them were there?

Not much of anything. Just sitting.

About a dozen of them.

Well, didn't you see anything

or hear anything?

I heard a couple of names.

One was called Waco.

And another called...

I can't remember exactly.

McBride, MacLean, McKay,

something like that.

- McKay? Did you say McKay?

- Something like that.

What did he look like, this fellow, McKay?

- Only saw his back.

- From the back then!

Well,

he was tall, taller than the rest.

He wore them long Mexican spurs

with the pointed rowels.

His horse and his clothes,

what color were they?

Black. Whole outfit, horse and man.

Even his holster.

I remember that,

because he wore it high on his belt.

Not low, like some of these

showoffy young'uns.

John McKay. That's who you saw.

You mean the McKay? Big John McKay?

That's right.

Thought he was killed years ago,

down along the Red River.

So did I.

Thanks for the coffee.

- If you need an extra gun, count me in.

- Thanks, Grundy.

Hot damn!

There's finally gonna be some action

around here.

Up. Here you go.

You weren't so eager

to get rid of me last night, Jed Davis.

Come on, Ginny,

there wasn't nothing personal about it.

Nothing personal!

Be the first time you ever laid hands

on me that it weren't personal!

High time they closed that dirty place.

Been the shame of this city.

Harold!

- Hi, Nell.

- I don't know you, do I?

- Bye, Nell.

- I sure as hell should remember him.

Harold, you tell me immediately

how you know that woman.

Harold! Answer me this instant.

She's a friend of Pa's.

Hey, Nell, give us something

to remember you by.

This'll remind you

of what you'll be missing, boys.

- That's my garter.

- No, it's mine.

Give me my garter, will you?

- I swear to...

- Fight!

I never figured on this much fuss.

Well, Howard, fuss is publicity.

Publicity is votes. Remember that.

I congratulate you, Mayor Wilker.

That establishment

was a blight on the entire community.

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Ronald M. Cohen

Ronald M. Cohen (December 23, 1939, Chicago, Illinois – April 21, 1998, Los Angeles, California) was a US American screen writer and film producer. His screenwriting career started in the 1960s and he studied Film at New York University. His screenwriting career encompassed Blue (1968 film), the 1977 film Twilight's Last Gleaming and the 1984 TV series Call to Glory. In 1977 he wrote a script for the movie adaption of Lothar-Günther Buchheims novel Das Boot, but it was rejected by Buchheim. For his screenwriting for the Series American Dream he was nominated for an Emmy in 1981. His last finished work was the screenwriting for the successful 1997 TV film Last Stand at Saber River starring Tom Selleck. He was in a relationship with actress Julie Adams. more…

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Submitted on August 05, 2018

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