The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie

Synopsis: Several bourgeois friends planning to get together for dinner experience a succession of highly unusual occurrences that interfere with their expected dining enjoyment.
Genre: Comedy
Director(s): Luis Buñuel
Production: 20th Century Fox
  Won 1 Oscar. Another 6 wins & 9 nominations.
 
IMDB:
8.0
Metacritic:
93
Rotten Tomatoes:
98%
PG
Year:
1972
102 min
675 Views


THE DISCREET CHARM

OF THE BOURGEOISIE

Shall I wait here, Your Excellency?

There's not even a fire.

And the table isn't set yet.

But it's after 8.

Good evening, dear Alice.

- Don Rafael, how are you?

- Just fine.

- I'm so glad to see you again.

- So am I.

What a surprise!

Had I known you were coming...

You weren't expecting us?

No, not tonight.

Not tonight?

No. I was expecting you tomorrow.

Tomorrow?

But Henri's invitation

was for tonight.

I'm sure of that.

That can't be...

- because Henri is at a business dinner.

- Incredible!

But I was there when he invited us.

In any case, tomorrow night is out.

I couldn't have accepted. I've a

dinner at the Colombian Embassy.

I really don't know what to say.

I'd invite you to eat with me,

but nothing is ready.

- I'm terribly sorry.

- Don't be. It's nothing.

A slight misunderstanding.

Won't you sit down?

Have a drink.

Don't put yourself out.

We'll be going.

By the way,

I know a charming inn nearby.

I've dined there on occasion.

- Let's try it. Be my guests.

- Good idea.

Why don't you join us?

That's sweet, but I'm not dressed.

No matter. It's quite

an informal place.

- Then I'll just change my dress.

- Not at all. Come as you are.

Not very cheerful.

Put this on.

Maybe it's closed.

The food's good. I'll check.

It's nothing special.

Yes?

We'd like to have dinner.

Are you closed?

- Then we can dine?

- Of course. One moment...

What's the meaning of this?

Call the manager, Mr. Manuel.

The management changed

Good evening, Madame.

Please come in.

Let's go.

Not very crowded.

- A bad sign.

- Maybe it's early.

Let's sit here.

You sit there.

Shall we start with the wine,

my friends?

It depends on what we order.

What do you prefer?

Bordeaux? Burgundy?

Burgundy.

Whether I have oysters or fish,

I go with red wine...

''Snails cooked in Chablis.''

I don't care for snails.

I'd fancy a hare terrine,

but in restaurants

they tend to use too much salt...

There's melon.

Good idea.

I'll have a melon with port.

I'd have caviar, but lt might not

be very good here.

I prefer my own caviar.

What do they have for fish?

I adore fish.

There's grilled sardines,

fillet of sole,

fried whiting,

brown-buttered skate,

pike quenelles in Nantua sauce,

blue trout...

This restaurant's cheap.

A cheap, empty restaurant

is dubious.

Think so?

I'll skip the melon and have

a dry martini instead.

Nothing but red wine for you.

And Crmant to make

Picard happy.

- What's going on?

- Where are you going? Stay here.

That's being indiscreet.

We'll have

a melon with port...

a plain melon...

The lady here will have roll mops...

What's going on?

The owner, Madame.

He died suddenly this afternoon.

We were so fond of him.

- He died in that suit?

- But why keep him here?

We're expecting the undertaker.

But we remain at your service.

I'm leaving. I won't eat here.

- Why not?

- You can't be serious, Rafael!

I don't mind.

But I assure you,

you'll have a fine dinner.

- No, I'm going.

- As you like.

- What shall we do?

- Try another place.

If you don't mind, I'd rather

go home. Will you take me?

Yes, with pleasure.

Mr. Snchal and Mr. Thevenot

are here.

Show them in.

Hello, Henri.

Hello, Francois. Please...

What happened last night?

- Why did you come by?

- You invited us.

You're mistaken.

It was for tonight.

I could never have accepted.

I'm engaged tonight.

I don't understand.

Are you free for lunch Saturday?

Let me check.

Saturday's fine with Francois.

About one o'clock.

I have nothing planned.

We'll be expecting you, then.

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Luis Buñuel

Luis Buñuel Portolés (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈlwis βuˈɲwel portoˈles]; 22 February 1900 – 29 July 1983) was a Spanish filmmaker who worked in Spain, Mexico and France.When Luis Buñuel died at age 83, his obituary in The New York Times called him "an iconoclast, moralist, and revolutionary who was a leader of avant-garde surrealism in his youth and a dominant international movie director half a century later". His first picture, Un Chien Andalou—made in the silent era—was called "the most famous short film ever made" by critic Roger Ebert, and his last film, That Obscure Object of Desire—made 48 years later—won him Best Director awards from the National Board of Review and the National Society of Film Critics. Writer Octavio Paz called Buñuel's work "the marriage of the film image to the poetic image, creating a new reality...scandalous and subversive".Often associated with the surrealist movement of the 1920s, Buñuel created films from the 1920s through the 1970s. His work spans two continents, three languages, and an array of genres, including experimental film, documentary, melodrama, satire, musical, erotica, comedy, romance, costume dramas, fantasy, crime film, adventure, and western. Despite this variety, filmmaker John Huston believed that, regardless of genre, a Buñuel film is so distinctive as to be instantly recognizable, or, as Ingmar Bergman put it, "Buñuel nearly always made Buñuel films".Six of Buñuel's films are included in Sight & Sound's 2012 critics' poll of the top 250 films of all time. Fifteen of his films are included in the They Shoot Pictures, Don't They? list of the 1,000 greatest films of all time, second only to Jean-Luc Godard, with sixteen, and he ranks number 13 on their list of the top 250 directors. more…

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Submitted on August 05, 2018

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