Sherlock Holmes Faces Death

Synopsis: During WWII several murders occur at a convalescent home where Dr. Watson has volunteered his services. He summons Holmes for help and the master detective proceeds to solve the crime from a long list of suspects including the owners of the home, the staff and the patients recovering there.
Director(s): Roy William Neill
Production: Universal Pictures
 
IMDB:
7.2
PASSED
Year:
1943
68 min
581 Views


Hurry up lads.

Drink up.

Five minutes to

closing time.

Come on now.

Five minutes closing time.

Hello sweetheart.

Here's for the tune, hey,

Here you're rotten luck,

that's what you are.

Let's have a look at it.

Ah, what can I

get you, lad?

Mother's ruin.

Make mine the same.

It'll cost you two bob for

the broken glass matey?

What's the idea anyway

letting a beast like that

fly around loose

in a public house?

You didn't ought to let

him smell the blood.

He's very fond of

blood, Charlie is.

Hmm.

Comes by his taste

natural if you ask me.

Nobody's asking you, Miss.

Where's he from?

Musgrave Manor.

What is this Musgrave

Manor, a blinking prison?

That ain't the worst

it's been called

not that I want to go

about spreading stories

but we knows

what we knows,

don't we Charlie?

Blimey.

Where is this

Musgrave Manor?

Down the road apiece.

You'll see it when you

past the old iron gates

only don't loiter.

You won't be welcome

not by the Musgraves

been sitting there.

Lords of the manor

ever since time was.

If those old

walls could speak

they'd tell you things

that raise the

hair on your head.

There's folks hereabouts

swear they seen

corpse lights

round the old greenhouse

and heard 'em wailing

like lost souls

in the lime rock,

yeah, I want

no part of it.

Nor the Musgraves

neither,

hard men,

like them as

was before them,

cruel men.

God pity 'em for

the day is coming

when they'll need pity.

I don't think you're

being quite fair, Geoffrey

I assure you

I have no wish

to be fair.

Hmm.

An excellent specimen

of the coprass Carolina.

You are a sweet old

soul aren't you?

I have no wish to

be a sweet old soul,

no wish to be anything

but what I am

a disagreeable person

who does not intend

to let his sister

run off with

the first cockshaw Yankee

who makes her posies jump.

And I suppose Philip feels

the same way about it?

Well, Philip has no

choice in the matter.

As my younger brother,

Phillip feels precisely

as I tell him to.

Eaves dropping

again, Brunton.

Oh, no, Mr. Phillip.

I assure you

But I didn't wish

to disturb 'em.

What did you

hear, Brunton?

Your brother

and Miss Sally

were going at it

hammer and tongues

about Captain

Vickery I mean.

Really?

Mr. Geoffrey and

Captain Vickery

had an horrible row this

afternoon over Miss Sally.

I thought they were

coming to blows.

Indeed I did.

Right.

That will do now Brunton.

If I catch you

snooping again

I shall ask my brother

to give you notice.

Yes sir.

Thank you, sir.

Your not above a bit

of snooping yourself

are you Phillip.

Not in the least old boy.

Brunton.

Oh there you are.

I've been ringing for you.

Sorry, Dr. Watson.

I was in the

upper regions.

The library's in

a filthy mess.

The wind came swishing

down the chimney

and scattered the

ashes everywhere.

Very well.

I'll tidy it up

at once, doctor.

Room full of smoke,

papers all over the floor.

Foul night Brunton.

It's customary.

Just the sort of

night I'd fancy

fit for the ghost

of Lady Torinda.

Oh no, Dr. Watson.

Lady Torinda only

walks in the west wing.

No one ever met a ghost

in this part of the house.

Oh really?

Isn't there some story...

Oh there was a

housemaid claimed

that she saw Sir

Gervis Musgrave

with his head on backwards

in this very room.

Oh, gracious me.

Well she was just a

flighty girl, sir.

It sounds like

it, very flighty.

Most.

Head on backwards, what

a bunch of rubbish.

I say, Brunton,

does the wind always

carry on like this here?

Frequently sir.

It's a great pity.

It makes the

gentlemen restless

more than usual I mean.

Well, our patients

are all tucked up

for the night

now, hey Brunton?

Are they?

Of course, of course.

Aren't they?

Captain Vickery isn't

in his room, sir,

and it looked like

Major Langford

I saw going

toward the pool.

And I can't account for

Lieutenant Clavering.

Really?

That's very odd.

Very odd, sir.

Anything else, sir.

No, thank you.

Oh, yes, yes.

You might tell Dr. Sexton

that I'd like to see him

for a minute, will you?

Very good, sir.

Good night, sir.

Good night, Brunton.

Get him up and let's get

him in this chair here.

Sorry.

I'm awfully sorry.

Get my bag, Brunton.

Yes sir.

Let's have a look.

Yes, near thing just

missed an artery.

Looks like a knife wound.

Here you are, sir.

It's like a nightmare.

Give me some of that

cotton and bottle.

Oh, no, fellow,

we'll have you patched

up in no time.

You'll be as good as new.

What happened?

I, I don't know.

It was in Lime

Walk just now.

I was coming up

from the village.

I remember distinctly

I was approaching

the greenhouse.

The wind was terrific.

I had to fight my way.

I hadn't the

slightest warning.

All I know is

that he struck

and that I went down.

He must have thought

I was done for.

Any idea who it was?

No.

Well, that is I...

Yes, yes...

Really I,

I haven't any right.

You have every

right, Dr. Sexton.

As head of this house,

I shall arrange for an

immediate investigation.

I'd rather not if

you don't mind, sir.

Dr. Sexton,

the fact that my brother

and sister and I

have opened our home to

convalescent patients

doesn't relieve us

of all responsibility

for what occurs in it.

I mean, under the

peculiar circumstances.

Oh, come on, Bob.

There's no need

to shield anyone.

Thirteen.

Thirteen, that's curious.

What's got into

the old clock?

Nothing, nothing at all.

Oh, sir.

Don't you remember the

last time it did that

your father was

killed the next day?

Mr. Holmes, sir.

Mr. Holmes.

Mr. Holmes.

Oh, Mr. Holmes,

I, oh I, oh...

A purely scientific

experiment Mrs. Hudson.

Oh, frightening the wits

out of honest people.

Permit me.

Oh dear,

so now it's bullet

holes in me plaster.

Oh, Mr. Holmes, this

is the last straw.

The last straw,

Mrs. Hudson,

the one which

breaks the back

of the case against

Jacob Dillery.

It proves beyond

a shadow of doubt

that even bound as

he claims he was

he could still

have fired the shot

in his own defense that

killed his wife's lover.

But shooting holes in

my beautiful plaster.

Come in, Watson.

My dear fellow, I'm

glad to find you in.

I didn't even knock.

How did you know

it was me, I.

Me is acceptable, Watson,

unless, of course,

you're a purist,

which I doubt,

and may I add

that your step

is like no

other in London.

You're just in

time for breakfast.

Good, I rather

counted on that.

Mrs. Hudson,

dear, how are you?

Oh, it's good to

see you again, sir.

I think they'll be

enough here for two.

Splendid.

You're a sight for

sore eyes, Watson.

Thanks, old boy,

and so are you.

Sit down.

Good, thank you.

All right let's have it.

What brings you from

North Cumberland

at this early hour?

Bad business, Holmes,

very bad business.

How did you know

that I came from

North Cumberland?

Elementary, my

dear Watson.

You're overnight bag

carried the fresh

Houston label.

The only train arriving

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Bertram Millhauser

Bertram Millhauser (March 25, 1892 – December 1, 1958) was an American screenwriter. He wrote for 61 films produced between 1911 and 1960. He was born in New York City, New York and died in Hollywood, California from a heart attack. more…

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Submitted on August 05, 2018

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