Pickman's Muse

Synopsis: Who is Goodie Hines? Why did he gouge out the eyes of his victims? Why did they beg him to do it? What could possibly have inspired such horrific imagery in his drawings and paintings that they've been banned--only to be duplicated to seemingly impossible detail by mild-mannered recluse, Robert Pickman, who claims never to have met Goodie nor seen his work, but refuses to reveal his sources? Dare we delve the mind of one dissolving into madness, to uncover his muse?
 
IMDB:
5.6
Year:
2010
77 min
18 Views


DR. DEXTER:
As your doctor, l'm having

you continue this with the pharmacist.

DR. DEXTER:
But as yourfriend,

l'm asking you to meet me halfway.

DR. DEXTER:
The first step towards any

real progress is communication , Robert.

DR. DEXTER:
And that's a two-way street...

lneed your help.

DR. DEXTER:
You 're not just a patient.

DR. DEXTER:
l made a promise to your Mother;

one l intend fully to keep.

DR. DEXTER:
Anytime, day or night,

you need to talk, you call me. l'll be there for you .

LANDLADY:
Three-thirty, back from the druggist;

l can set my watch by you .

LANDLADY:
And pays his rent on time,

just like clockwork.

LANDLADY:
l wish all my tenants could be like you .

LANDLADY:
You 're a good, reliable man .

That's hard to find these days.

LANDLADY:
All those pills you take.

That's not what you need.

LANDLADY:
The druggist doesn 't have your cure.

LANDLADY:
What you need is a good woman .

LANDLADY:
l want you to meet my niece.

LANDLADY:
She's coming here from New York.

LANDLADY:
She'd be good for you . She's pretty.

LANDLADY:
She doesn 't have any friends either.

And she's a good cook.

LANDLADY:
She'd make you a good healthy dinner...

LANDLADY:
Okay?

PlCKMAN:
Alright...

ART DEALER:
Twelve noon , right on the dot.

Are you ever late, Mr. Pickman ?

ART DEALER:
l have good news for you .

ART DEALER:
l got you another commission ,

a bed and breakfast out in the country.

ART DEALER:
This old lady is redoing her guestrooms and

wants several paintings to match her new wallpaper.

ART DEALER:
l got herto commit to six. Six!

ART DEALER:
That will pay both of our rents for

the rest of the year.

ART DEALER:
But l can 't take any credit;

it's never been hard to sell a Pickman .

ART DEALER:
You have quite a knack for painting those

Lighthouses and Seascapes. These old ladies love you .

ART DEALER:
Here are the swatches forthe wallpaper,

so you can match the colors.

ART DEALER:
What's this? This isn 't the painting

we discussed.

ART DEALER:
l know this painting.

ART DEALER:
This was the one rejected by that decorator --

and rightly so.

ART DEALER:
This isn 't your normal work. Look at these

brush strokes...

ART DEALER:
...very amateurish, and there's no soul,

no emotions...

ART DEALER:
My God, Pickman; that was over a month ago.

ART DEALER:
Do you mean to tell me you haven 't painted

anything new since then ?

ART DEALER:
This is our livelihood, Pickman .

ART DEALER:
This puts us way behind. Ashcroft is expecting

four paintings, and he's not a patient man .

ART DEALER:
What am l supposed to tell him?

PlCKMAN:
Fine! Tell him l can 't do it anymore.

ART DEALER:
Robert.

ART DEALER:
Alright, Robert, l'm sorry.

Maybe l've been overworking you a bit.

ART DEALER:
lt's just that the money has been so good.

ART DEALER:
Alright, take some time away.

l'll stall Ashcroft for a week ortwo...

ART DEALER:
Travel; go on vacation; see some new sights.

PlCKMAN:
What's the point? lt all looks the same...no?

ART DEALER:
Oh, God...

DR. DEXTER:
Robert? lt's Ambrose Dexter.

PlCKMAN:
What do you want?

LANDLADY:
l'm so sorry. Your doctorthought you

might be needing help.

DR. DEXTER:
Robert, You missed two appointments.

l was concerned. l was worried.

PlCKMAN:
l've been working.

LANDLADY:
l'm very sorry, Mr. Pickman . We'll be

leaving you now.

DR. DEXTER:
Working...? Robert, you 're painting again ?

DR. DEXTER:
That's wonderful! What brought you around?

PlCKMAN:
Doc, ljust don 't have time to get into it right now;

l have to get back to work.

LANDLADY:
Yes, of course. Sorry to have disturbed you .

DR. DEXTER:
Well, Robert, you know l'm the last man in the

world that would everwant to stop you from getting back

to work...

DR. DEXTER:
But, when you have the time, come on in

and make an appointment...

DR. DEXTER:
You know there's always room for you

in my schedule.

PlCKMAN:
Yes. l will.

ART DEALER:
Well, l'll be. What are you doing here today,

Mr. Pickman ? This isn 't your usual appointment.

PlCKMAN:
l need money for more paint and canvases

and supplies and stuff.

PlCKMAN:
Look. Can you sell this?

ART DEALER:
lnteresting. Where did you get this,

Mr. Pickman ?

PlCKMAN:
What do you mean ? lt's mine.

ART DEALER:
Yours?

PlCKMAN:
Yeah. l painted it.

ART DEALER:
You 're joking with me.

PlCKMAN:
No.

ART DEALER:
This isn 't anything like yourwork.

ART DEALER:
l'd swearthis was the work of Goodie Hines.

PlCKMAN:
No. lt's my work.

ART DEALER:
l've seen my share of recreations

of Goodie's work...

ART DEALER:
but this, by far, is the best l've ever seen .

PlCKMAN:
No, no, no. This is not a recreation .

PlCKMAN:
This is an example of my new stuff, my new work.

PlCKMAN:
l don 't even know who Goodie Hines is...

ART DEALER:
Don 't you ever read the papers? ''The Vicious

Visionary'', ''The Painter of Pain ''.

ART DEALER:
The media had a field day with him.

ART DEALER:
You really should keep up with the news.

He killed and mutilated seven people.

ART DEALER:
He cut their eyes out while they were still living.

He said they begged him to do it.

PlCKMAN:
l'm sure they did... l still don 't know who he is.

ART DEALER:
You should. He's up at County Hospital

with your Dr. Dexter.

ART DEALER:
Ambrose Dexter is your doctor, right?

PlCKMAN:
Yeah.

ART DEALER:
He never mentioned Goodie?

PlCKMAN:
No! l don 't even know why he would.

ART DEALER:
Your Doctor kept Goodie from getting the Chair.

ART DEALER:
Sometimes l think you live in a bubble.

You know that, Robert?.

PlCKMAN:
Maybe l do. ljust came by for supplies...

ART DEALER:
Ever since all that horrible business...

ART DEALER:
l've got people coming in here all the time trying

to pass off imitations of Goodie's work...

ART DEALER:
...especially of the church.

ARTDEALER:
This is the best example l've seen .

ART DEALER:
And you 've never seen one of

Goodie's paintings?

PlCKMAN:
ljust don 't know how many times l can tell you -- no.

ART DEALER:
That's simply amazing. Well, l want to show

you something.

PlCKMAN:
Show me what?

ART DEALER:
One of Goodie's works, of course. l've got one

of the last ones.

ART DEALER:
Managed to get one before they locked them all

up as evidence.

ART DEALER:
And l'm going to retire on that sale when

the time's right.

PlCKMAN:
l don 't have time right now. ljust need

the supplies...

ART DEALER:
l'll take care of your supplies. But come on ,

l want to show you this.

ART DEALER:
l'm embarrassed to say it, but those murders

were a real boon for sales.

ART DEALER:
You know what they say: Nothing improves the

price of an artist's work more than death, or insanity.

ART DEALER:
l had a feeling something was not right with

Goodie when he starting signing his paintings differently.

ART DEALER:
Strange little thing, really; he began connecting

the two O's in Goodie like the sign for infinity.

ART DEALER:
Yep. Amazing piece of work, isn 't it?

ART DEALER:
Say what you want about the material, but no

one has a right to deprive the art community of such work.

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    "Pickman's Muse" Scripts.com. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 24 Jul 2024. <https://www.scripts.com/script/pickman's_muse_15865>.

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