Great Expectations

Synopsis: Young Pip is expected to become a blacksmith, but, hating the soot and smoke, he secretly dreams of becoming a gentleman. When he meets the mysterious Miss Havisham and her haughty niece Estella, Pip is confident that his dream is to come true.
Genre: Drama
Director(s): Julian Jarrold
  Nominated for 1 Primetime Emmy. Another 4 wins & 5 nominations.
 
IMDB:
7.3
Year:
1999
168 min
148 Views

Mummy!

Mummy!

Hang it right main,

hang it right.

Where have you been?

What I've got before me

when you go for your leisure.

You tell me directly what

you've been doing!

- Well?

Or I'd have you out of that corner if you

was 50 Pips, and he was 500 Gargerys.

I... I've been down to hear the carols.

Carols, is it?

Perhaps if I weren't a blacksmith's wife

and a slave with an apron never off

only should I been to hear the carols.

But too busy am I bringing

you up by hand.

- Why do I do it?.

- I don't know, sister.

I don't... Was it I brought me

this being your mother?

This house, this apron and him.

That's all.

I hope you sang your heart out,

old chap.

Glad to

I gave it out, Joe.

I'm hungry, boy.

I'm hungry.

Please, sir! Please, sir!

Nice fat cheeks though,

I'd munch them, eh?

- What is your name, boy.

- Pip...

What? Come on, give it mouth!

Pip. Pip, sir.

Pip! Pip!

Well, boy?

- What's in the bottle, boy?

- Brandy, sir.

I need to eat to live.

You have no one with you?

- I brought no one with me, sir.

- Nor give no one the office to follow you?

No! Oh, no, sir.

- Pip, is it?

- Yes, sir.

I am hunted and

condemned to death, Pip.

They'll come for me.

- I'm glad you enjoy it.

- Did you speak?

I said I was glad

you enjoyed that.

Well...

thank you, my boy.

I do.

- Another out there.

- Since last night.

Did you hear then?

Compeyson must be out.

- Excuse me, sir?

- Compeyson is out.

I'll put him down like a bloodhound.

Curse this bloody iron on my leg.

Give me that file, boy.

Merry Christmas.

And for which may the Lord

may he make us truly,

truly grateful.

Amen.

You hear that?

You be grateful.

Especially dear boy to them

which brought you up by hand.

Oh is it that the young

are never grateful?

- Naturally vicious.

- True.

I must say anyone looking for

a moral for the young

will not find it in today's sermon.

No, indeed.

Indeed we felt as much

it was well chosen.

Now, if I'd be in the position

to enter into a fit subject...

- Look at pork alone.

- There's a subject.

- If you want a subject,

look at pork.

True, sir. Many a moral for the young

might be deduced from the text.

You listen to this!

Swine were the companions

of the prodigal.

The gluttony of swine is put before us

as an example to the young.

Think what you've

got to be grateful for,

You would have been

disposed of for a few shillings.

Yes, mam.

Disposed...

And then Dunstable the butcher

would have come up to you

as you lay in your straw and he would have

whipped you under his left arm

and shed your blood with

a penknife with his right.

No bringing up by hand then.

Not a bit of it.

Uncle...

Uncle, what is it?

Are you all right, uncle?

Tar!

Tar?

Why, how ever could tar

come there?

Here you are.

Come on, look sharp.

Excuse me, ladies and gentlemen but I am on a chase for Queen and country

and I want the blacksmith.

Joe!

The lock of one of them goes wrong

and the coupling don't act pretty.

They are in the marshes still.

We will try to get clear of them before dusk.

Would you care for a little brandy, sergeant?

Wine, I think, mum.

Afterwards, sergeant, I rather

thought that perhaps...

Well, some of us may have the inclination

to come down with the soldiers

and see what comes of this hunt.

- No objections here.

Mrs Joe don't mind

we'll see those villains caught, Pip?

Come on!

There!

Surrender!

Arrest him!

I took him!

I give him up to you!

There's nothing to be particular about.

Handcuffs there!

I took him and he knows it.

That's enough for me.

Take notice, sergeant,

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Charles Dickens

Charles John Huffam Dickens (; 7 February 1812 – 9 June 1870) was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world's best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era. His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime, and by the 20th century critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories are still widely read today.Born in Portsmouth, Dickens left school to work in a factory when his father was incarcerated in a debtors' prison. Despite his lack of formal education, he edited a weekly journal for 20 years, wrote 15 novels, five novellas, hundreds of short stories and non-fiction articles, lectured and performed readings extensively, was an indefatigable letter writer, and campaigned vigorously for children's rights, education, and other social reforms. Dickens's literary success began with the 1836 serial publication of The Pickwick Papers. Within a few years he had become an international literary celebrity, famous for his humour, satire, and keen observation of character and society. His novels, most published in monthly or weekly instalments, pioneered the serial publication of narrative fiction, which became the dominant Victorian mode for novel publication. Cliffhanger endings in his serial publications kept readers in suspense. The instalment format allowed Dickens to evaluate his audience's reaction, and he often modified his plot and character development based on such feedback. For example, when his wife's chiropodist expressed distress at the way Miss Mowcher in David Copperfield seemed to reflect her disabilities, Dickens improved the character with positive features. His plots were carefully constructed, and he often wove elements from topical events into his narratives. Masses of the illiterate poor chipped in ha'pennies to have each new monthly episode read to them, opening up and inspiring a new class of readers.Dickens was regarded as the literary colossus of his age. His 1843 novella, A Christmas Carol, remains popular and continues to inspire adaptations in every artistic genre. Oliver Twist and Great Expectations are also frequently adapted, and, like many of his novels, evoke images of early Victorian London. His 1859 novel, A Tale of Two Cities, set in London and Paris, is his best-known work of historical fiction. Dickens has been praised by fellow writers—from Leo Tolstoy to George Orwell, G. K. Chesterton and Tom Wolfe —for his realism, comedy, prose style, unique characterisations, and social criticism. On the other hand, Oscar Wilde, Henry James, and Virginia Woolf complained of a lack of psychological depth, loose writing, and a vein of saccharine sentimentalism. The term Dickensian is used to describe something that is reminiscent of Dickens and his writings, such as poor social conditions or comically repulsive characters. more…

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Submitted on August 05, 2018

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"Great Expectations" Scripts.com. STANDS4 LLC, 2019. Web. 12 Nov. 2019. <https://www.scripts.com/script/great_expectations_9301>.

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