The Last Sunset

Synopsis: Brendan O'Malley arrives at the Mexican home of old flame Belle Breckenridge to find her married to a drunkard getting ready for a cattle drive to Texas. Hot on O'Malley's heels is lawman Dana Stribling who has a personal reason for getting him back into his jurisdiction. Both men join Breckenridge and his wife on the drive. As they near Texas tensions mount, not least because Stribling is starting to court Belle and O'Malley is increasingly drawn by her daughter Missy.
Director(s): Robert Aldrich
Production: Universal Pictures
  1 nomination.
 
IMDB:
6.8
APPROVED
Year:
1961
112 min
24 Views

you. You were killing him.

I'm trying to tell you that I've

changed. I'm completely different now.

You'll see.

You still got

that yellow dress?

I burned it.

I'll get you another one.

Oh, Belle. Belle...

Belle, remember that night?

The music floating down

from your uncle's house,

me sitting by my campfire,

thinking of you dancing

in the arms of other men

and wanting to kill someone.

And then I looked up,

you were standing there.

Standing beside my fire in

your yellow dress like a flame.

Oh, Belle.

Belle.

Oh, please,

keep away from me.

I'm afraid of you.

Whatever you say, Belle.

Why do you wear

your gun in your belt?

Well, I like to know

exactly where it is.

In your belt, you can feel it right

up there against you all the time.

Papa says a derringer hasn't got

any range. He always wears a Colt 45.

Oh, I'm sorry

to hear that, miss.

Why?

Well, no handgun's accurate

beyond 20 feet.

And no holster gun can

draw as fast as a derringer.

My papa greases the

inside of his holster.

I'm afraid that wouldn't

do him any good.

Also, the derringer carries

a bigger slug, miss.

You can call me

Melissa, if you like.

Well, let's just compromise.

I'll call you Missy.

What's the matter?

Oh, it's only Papa.

Good morning,

child of my heart.

Rosario, come

get Papa's horse.

Good morning, my dear.

Good, I say, because it's one of the

last we'll spend on this accursed ranch.

Did you find trail hands?

Just one.

But I'm sure two or three

more will join us directly.

Not many people want to

work for a living these days.

Oh, John,

this is Mr. O'Malley.

How do you do?

Welcome, Mr. O'Malley.

Permit me to offer you the

hospitality of these poor acres.

Thank you,

Mr. Breckenridge.

We have a saying down here in

Mexico, to which I hardly subscribe.

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Dalton Trumbo

James Dalton Trumbo (December 9, 1905 – September 10, 1976) was an American screenwriter and novelist who scripted many award-winning films including Roman Holiday, Exodus, Spartacus, and Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo. One of the Hollywood Ten, he refused to testify before the House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC) in 1947 during the committee's investigation of communist influences in the motion picture industry. He, along with the other members of the Hollywood Ten and hundreds of other industry professionals, was subsequently blacklisted by that industry. His talents as one of the top screenwriters allowed him to continue working clandestinely, producing work under other authors' names or pseudonyms. His uncredited work won two Academy Awards: for Roman Holiday (1953), which was given to a front writer, and for The Brave One (1956) which was awarded to a pseudonym of Trumbo's. When he was given public screen credit for both Exodus and Spartacus in 1960, this marked the beginning of the end of the Hollywood Blacklist for Trumbo and other screenwriters. He finally was given full credit by the Writers' Guild for all his achievements, the work of which encompassed six decades of screenwriting. more…

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Submitted on August 05, 2018

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"The Last Sunset" Scripts.com. STANDS4 LLC, 2019. Web. 13 Dec. 2019. <https://www.scripts.com/script/the_last_sunset_12292>.

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