The House on 92nd Street

Synopsis: Preface: a stentorian narrator tells us that the USA was flooded with Nazi spies in 1939-41. One such tries to recruit college grad Bill Dietrich, who becomes a double agent for the FBI. While Bill trains in Hamburg, a street-accident victim proves to have been spying on atom-bomb secrets; conveniently, Dietrich is assigned to the New York spy ring stealing these secrets. Can he track down the mysterious "Christopher" before his ruthless associates unmask and kill him?
Director(s): Henry Hathaway
Production: Twentieth Century Fox
  Won 1 Oscar. Another 1 win.
 
IMDB:
6.8
Rotten Tomatoes:
50%
APPROVED
Year:
1945
88 min
7 Views

were flourishing.

The Germans said

they were only social gatherings.

But the FBI knew that these societies

were part of a well-laid German plan...

...to build up a fifth column

in the United States.

In 1939, on the campus

of a Midwestern university...

...not far from Columbus, Ohio,

there was a brilliant young student.

Born of German-American parents

who were proud of his college record...

...he was preparing

to become a diesel engineer.

His name was William Dietrich.

Just before graduation...

...Dietrich was approached

by German representatives...

...who offered him a free trip to Germany

and a well-paying job on arrival.

Dietrich reported the incident

to the FBI.

When the meaning of the German

invitation was explained to him...

...Dietrich offered his services

to the Bureau.

With money generously supplied

by the Germans...

...Dietrich bought passage at the German

Tourist Bureau in New York City.

The Germans felt that Dietrich

was an extremely valuable man.

So did the FBI.

Ten days later Dietrich was 3500 miles

from New York...

...in Germany's great port city

of Hamburg.

On the Klopstockstrasse

was a second-rate hotel...

...the Pension Klopstock, which housed

the German High Command's...

...notorious school for spies.

Here were trained hundreds

of recruits for the Abwehr...

...Germany's super-secret espionage

and sabotage service.

Like Dietrich,

many of his classmates...

...had been recruited

in the United States.

And back to the United States

they would go...

...when they were properly equipped.

Synthesis of the FBI's

counterespionage offensive...

...in World War II

is the Christopher case...

...which opened, as great cases

often do, by accident.

A little accident

at Bowling Green in New York City.

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Barré Lyndon

Barré Lyndon (pseudonym of Alfred Edgar) (12 August 1896 – 23 October 1972) was a British playwright and screenwriter. The pseudonym was presumably taken from the title character of Thackeray's novel. Born in London, he may be best remembered for three screenplays from the 1940s: The Lodger (1944), Hangover Square (1945) and The Man in Half Moon Street (1945). The latter was remade by Hammer Film Productions in 1959 as The Man Who Could Cheat Death. Lyndon began his writing career as a journalist, particularly about motor-racing, and short-story writer before becoming a playwright. His first play, The Amazing Dr. Clitterhouse, was made into an Edward G. Robinson film in 1939. After that success, Lyndon moved to Los Angeles, California, in 1941 to concentrate on writing for films full time. He was naturalised as a United States citizen in the United States District Court in Los Angeles as Alfred Edgar Barre Lyndon in 1952. Alfred Edgar had two sons, Roger Alvin Edgar (b. England, 1924) and Barry Davis Edgar (b. England, 1929) . more…

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Submitted on August 05, 2018

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"The House on 92nd Street" Scripts.com. STANDS4 LLC, 2019. Web. 21 Oct. 2019. <https://www.scripts.com/script/the_house_on_92nd_street_20469>.

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