The African Queen

Synopsis: September 1914, news reaches the colony German Eastern Africa that Germany is at war, so Reverend Samuel Sayer became a hostile foreigner. German imperial troops burn down his mission; he is beaten and dies of fever. His well-educated, snobbish sister Rose Sayer buries him and leaves by the only available transport, the dilapidated river steamboat 'African Queen' of grumpy Charlie Allnut. As if a long difficult journey without any comfort weren't bad enough for such odd companions, she is determined to find a way to do their bit for the British war effort (and avenge her brother) and aims high, as God is obviously on their side: construct their own equipment, a torpedo and the converted steamboat, to take out a huge German warship, the Louisa, which is hard to find on the giant lake and first of all to reach, in fact as daunting an expedition as anyone attempted since the late adventurous explorer John Speakes, but she presses till Charlie accepts to steam up the Ulana, about to brave
Director(s): John Huston
Production: Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment
  Won 1 Oscar. Another 2 wins & 9 nominations.
 
IMDB:
7.9
Metacritic:
91
Rotten Tomatoes:
98%
PG
Year:
1951
105 min
709 Views


as my brother's presence here

bears witness.

- No offense, miss.

- War.

Yeah. Yeah, looks like it.

Well, I'll be shoving off.

Thanks for the tea.

Take care of yourselves.

- Goodbye. Thank you.

- Goodbye, Mr. Allnut.

Wretched little man. What indifference.

He's a Canadian.

Doesn't he realize he's in this, too?

Shouldn't we perhaps try

to get to Limbasi while we can?

A good shepherd

doesn't desert his flock

when the wolves are prowling.

We must ask the Almighty

to bless the arms of England

and carry her through her hour of trial.

Rose, go into the house and stay there.

What's the meaning of this outrage?

How dare you!

Samuel!

Dear, here you are.

And without your hat on.

Didn't you hear me calling you?

Yes, but I must get the seeds in now.

It's a bit late. August.

But, dear, you know it doesn't matter

when one plants in Central Africa.

Africa?

Brother, dear, you're not at all well.

Africa?

- I'll help you off with your things.

- Rose.

Brother. Brother. Dear.

Smite the Amalekites, O Lord.

Smite them, hip and thigh.

Amen.

Cold. Foggy.

Where's Rose?

Rose, are you down there in the shop?

I'm here.

Bring me a nice, hot cup of tea.

I'm here, Brother, beside you.

I try so hard, you know, to study.

Hebrew, Greek. I've got no facility.

If I don't pass the examinations,

I shall volunteer as a missionary.

Rose, too.

Not comely among the maidens,

but she, too, can be a servant

in the house of the Lord.

Even for such as she,

God has a goodly purpose.

I'm going to put my books away.

I'm not going to work anymore.

If I don't pass, it'll just mean

that God has other work for me.

Thy will be done.

O Lord, if it be thy will,

let me distinguish myself.

Give me a call here in England at home.

Mother would be so proud.

Rate this script:(3.67 / 3 votes)

John Huston

John Marcellus Huston (; August 5, 1906 – August 28, 1987) was an Irish-American film director, screenwriter and actor. Huston was a citizen of the United States by birth but renounced U.S. citizenship to become an Irish citizen and resident. He returned to reside in the United States where he died. He wrote the screenplays for most of the 37 feature films he directed, many of which are today considered classics: The Maltese Falcon (1941), The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1948), The Asphalt Jungle (1950), The African Queen (1951), The Misfits (1961), Fat City (1972) and The Man Who Would Be King (1975). During his 46-year career, Huston received 15 Oscar nominations, won twice, and directed both his father, Walter Huston, and daughter, Anjelica Huston, to Oscar wins in different films. Huston was known to direct with the vision of an artist, having studied and worked as a fine art painter in Paris in his early years. He continued to explore the visual aspects of his films throughout his career, sketching each scene on paper beforehand, then carefully framing his characters during the shooting. While most directors rely on post-production editing to shape their final work, Huston instead created his films while they were being shot, making them both more economical and cerebral, with little editing needed. Most of Huston's films were adaptations of important novels, often depicting a "heroic quest," as in Moby Dick, or The Red Badge of Courage. In many films, different groups of people, while struggling toward a common goal, would become doomed, forming "destructive alliances," giving the films a dramatic and visual tension. Many of his films involved themes such as religion, meaning, truth, freedom, psychology, colonialism and war. Huston has been referred to as "a titan", "a rebel", and a "renaissance man" in the Hollywood film industry. Author Ian Freer describes him as "cinema's Ernest Hemingway"—a filmmaker who was "never afraid to tackle tough issues head on." more…

All John Huston scripts | John Huston Scripts

FAVORITE (0 fans)

Submitted on August 05, 2018

Discuss this script with the community:

0 Comments

    Translation

    Translate and read this script in other languages:

    Select another language:

    • - Select -
    • 简体中文 (Chinese - Simplified)
    • 繁體中文 (Chinese - Traditional)
    • Español (Spanish)
    • Esperanto (Esperanto)
    • 日本語 (Japanese)
    • Português (Portuguese)
    • Deutsch (German)
    • العربية (Arabic)
    • Français (French)
    • Русский (Russian)
    • ಕನ್ನಡ (Kannada)
    • 한국어 (Korean)
    • עברית (Hebrew)
    • Gaeilge (Irish)
    • Українська (Ukrainian)
    • اردو (Urdu)
    • Magyar (Hungarian)
    • मानक हिन्दी (Hindi)
    • Indonesia (Indonesian)
    • Italiano (Italian)
    • தமிழ் (Tamil)
    • Türkçe (Turkish)
    • తెలుగు (Telugu)
    • ภาษาไทย (Thai)
    • Tiếng Việt (Vietnamese)
    • Čeština (Czech)
    • Polski (Polish)
    • Bahasa Indonesia (Indonesian)
    • Românește (Romanian)
    • Nederlands (Dutch)
    • Ελληνικά (Greek)
    • Latinum (Latin)
    • Svenska (Swedish)
    • Dansk (Danish)
    • Suomi (Finnish)
    • فارسی (Persian)
    • ייִדיש (Yiddish)
    • հայերեն (Armenian)
    • Norsk (Norwegian)
    • English (English)

    Citation

    Use the citation below to add this screenplay to your bibliography:

    Style:MLAChicagoAPA

    "The African Queen" Scripts.com. STANDS4 LLC, 2021. Web. 12 Apr. 2021. <https://www.scripts.com/script/the_african_queen_2280>.

    We need you!

    Help us build the largest writers community and scripts collection on the web!

    Watch the movie trailer

    The African Queen

    The Marketplace:

    Sell your Script !

    Get listed in the most prominent screenplays collection on the web!


    Browse Scripts.com

    The Studio:

    ScreenWriting Tool

    Write your screenplay and focus on the story with many helpful features.


    Scripts.com

    Thanks for your vote! We truly appreciate your support.