Riptide

Synopsis: Park Avenue party-girl Mary (Norma Shearer) and staid English nobleman, Lord Phillip Rexford (Herbert Marshall) are married on a lark, they live happily in London. He must travel to America on business leaving her home alone. Lord Rexford's aunt invites Mary on a trip to the Riviera where she runs into an old flame, Tommie Treal (Robert Montgomery). Under the spell of the sea breezes and the Mediterranean moon (a semi-excuse for adultery to keep Queen Norma's image clean, as this was a post-Production Code film), Mary is the "innocent" victim of a romantic escapade that makes headlines as well as the scandal sheets. None of Mary's explanations can soothe Lord Phillip, his cold indifference drives Mary, who fights against it (a minor and feeble struggle at best), closer to Tommie. As the two lovers surrender to their ardor, Lord R. learns from his lawyer that Mary had been telling the truth, and he calls for her to join him in Cannes with a clean slate. O.K, but as Chief White Eagle tol
Genre: Drama, Romance
Director(s): Edmund Goulding
Production: Warner Bros.
 
IMDB:
6.5
PASSED
Year:
1934
92 min
66 Views


Listen. I tell you what. We go up to my sister Sylvia's.

There's some fun going on up there.

Do you like mad parties ?

Well, yes, I think I do, thank you very much.

Good. What's your name ?

Rexford.

Where do you live ?

Ritz chambers.

Well, you run along home and get on a nice evening dress

and pick me up in an hour. How's that ?

Right.

Right. No, wrong. I'll pick you up.

That'll be quicker. And step on it.

Yes, I'd better, before somebody steps on me.

The lady, milord.

Thank you.

Milord.

Milady.

Is he kidding ?

Are you a lord ?

I'm terribly sorry, yes.

Are you really the beetle ?

I was the beetle.

How do you like

picking up a lady to go to a ball ?

Adored it.

Lucky, wasn't it ?

Most fortunate.

You could be cavorting around a hot room

with some fat old sheep tick or even a flea.

Now here you are on the threshold of trouble

with someone who happens at the moment to be very unattached.

The gods be praised.

Just how unattached are you ?

Free as the air.

We haven't differed on anything up to now, have we ?

No, I know.

I think it's a good sign.

From home.

How did you know I wanted a highball ?

Just instinct.

Sweet.

And you too.

Fun, isn't it ?

From out of nowhere.

It's where the best things come from, nowhere.

Glad ?

Thrilled.

May I ?

If you want to.

Old beetle.

Are they blowing that whistle for us ?

No, the French lines

are very sympathetic about a thing like this.

How sweet.

Come with me to my stateroom.

No, no. That boat's my enemy.

It's taking you away from me.

But only for a while.

You think so ? No.

Forever, I'm afraid.

Darling, do you know why

I can't stand you leaving me ?

It's been so perfect up to now.

Too good to be true, hasn't it ?

And it's everything a woman thinks of love.

I'm not over it yet, but I will be eventually.

Rate this script:(0.00 / 0 votes)

Edmund Goulding

Edmund Goulding (20 March 1891 – 24 December 1959) was a British film writer and director. As an actor early in his career he was one of the 'Ghosts' in the 1922 British made Paramount silent Three Live Ghosts alongside Norman Kerry and Cyril Chadwick. Also in the early 1920s he wrote several screenplays for star Mae Murray for films directed by her then husband Robert Z. Leonard. Goulding is best remembered for directing cultured dramas such as Love (1927), Grand Hotel (1932) with Greta Garbo and Joan Crawford, Dark Victory (1939) with Bette Davis, and The Razor's Edge (1946) with Gene Tierney and Tyrone Power. He also directed the classic film noir Nightmare Alley (1947) with Tyrone Power and Joan Blondell, and the action drama The Dawn Patrol. He was also a successful songwriter, composer, and producer. more…

All Edmund Goulding scripts | Edmund Goulding Scripts

FAVORITE (0 fans)

Submitted on August 05, 2018

Discuss this script with the community:

0 Comments

    Translation

    Translate and read this script in other languages:

    Select another language:

    • - Select -
    • 简体中文 (Chinese - Simplified)
    • 繁體中文 (Chinese - Traditional)
    • Español (Spanish)
    • Esperanto (Esperanto)
    • 日本語 (Japanese)
    • Português (Portuguese)
    • Deutsch (German)
    • العربية (Arabic)
    • Français (French)
    • Русский (Russian)
    • ಕನ್ನಡ (Kannada)
    • 한국어 (Korean)
    • עברית (Hebrew)
    • Gaeilge (Irish)
    • Українська (Ukrainian)
    • اردو (Urdu)
    • Magyar (Hungarian)
    • मानक हिन्दी (Hindi)
    • Indonesia (Indonesian)
    • Italiano (Italian)
    • தமிழ் (Tamil)
    • Türkçe (Turkish)
    • తెలుగు (Telugu)
    • ภาษาไทย (Thai)
    • Tiếng Việt (Vietnamese)
    • Čeština (Czech)
    • Polski (Polish)
    • Bahasa Indonesia (Indonesian)
    • Românește (Romanian)
    • Nederlands (Dutch)
    • Ελληνικά (Greek)
    • Latinum (Latin)
    • Svenska (Swedish)
    • Dansk (Danish)
    • Suomi (Finnish)
    • فارسی (Persian)
    • ייִדיש (Yiddish)
    • հայերեն (Armenian)
    • Norsk (Norwegian)
    • English (English)

    Citation

    Use the citation below to add this screenplay to your bibliography:

    Style:MLAChicagoAPA

    "Riptide" Scripts.com. STANDS4 LLC, 2021. Web. 21 Jan. 2021. <https://www.scripts.com/script/riptide_16977>.

    We need you!

    Help us build the largest writers community and scripts collection on the web!

    Watch the movie trailer

    Riptide

    The Marketplace:

    Sell your Script !

    Get listed in the most prominent screenplays collection on the web!


    The Studio:

    ScreenWriting Tool

    Write your screenplay and focus on the story with many helpful features.


    Thanks for your vote! We truly appreciate your support.