The Limey script
The Limey (1999)
Synopsis: The Limey follows Wilson (Terence Stamp), a tough English ex-con who travels to Los Angeles to avenge his daughter's death. Upon arrival, Wilson goes to task battling Valentine (Peter Fonda) and an army of L.A.'s toughest criminals, hoping to find clues and piece together what happened. After surviving a near-death beating, getting thrown from a building and being chased down a dangerous mountain road, the Englishman decides to dole out some bodily harm of his own.

NOTE:
THE HARD COPY OF THIS SCRIPT CONTAINED SCENE NUMBERS.

THEY HAVE BEEN REMOVED FROM THIS SOFT COPY.

Wilson's first impression of Los Angeles was blue. He was in

the sky at the time, so it was a curious reversal, looking

down rather than up at the color he had always felt was

nature's finest.

Swimming pools. Hundreds of them. Pockmarking the landscape

like miniature lakes. A flat landscape of straight streets

and square blocks and sparse grass that didn't look quite

green enough.

As far as Wilson could remember, he had only ever seen seven

or eight swimming pools in his entire life and they had been

public ones. Here everyone had their own. Marvellous.

There was the one at the Butlin's holiday camp where he had

enjoyed his last legitimate employment -- as driver of a tour

bus. And there was the one at Crystal Palace he had gone to

once or twice when he was younger. He was most familiar,

though, with the Chelsea Baths as he had lived for some time

in a flat nearby in what he now thought of as his good years

-- before he'd gone grey, went to prison, and found himself in

a plane over a foreign town arriving to avenge the death of

his daughter.

WHOOSH! The sound of automatic doors opening and --

EXT. ARRIVALS TERMINAL. L.A. AIRPORT. AFTERNOON.

WILSON steps out into the late sunlight and the heat of the

day. A slow-motion moment while he gets acclimatized. He

wouldn't have ever felt quite this kind of heat before.

After such a rigorously air-conditioned interior. Or seen

cops wearing guns on their belts. Or black cops, for that

matter, with guns on their belts. Or seen people as fat as

Americans on their home turf. Things someone from England

notices immediately, whether consciously at first or not.

CUT.

EXT. MOTEL. EVENING.

Wilson's not here for comfort. Shown to a shitty room, round

the corner of a typical 2nd-level outside walkway. Airport

close by.

INT. MOTEL ROOM. EVENING.

He draws a curtain open across a window in one strong easy

glide. His moves are neat. His expressions just as

economical, not giving much away. Outside the planes are

practically on top of us. The sunset colors strange and

chemical.

He's only got one light bag. Unzips, unpacks a few things.

Change of clothes, a travel kit, and some familiar items

(shaving foam/toothpaste/deodorant} bearing unfamiliar

British brand names.

Goes into the bathroom. Turns on the shower in there.

Comes back to sit on the bed. Takes an envelope out of his

jacket.

ENVELOPE:

Turns it over to see the return address on the back.

CUT.

INT. TAXI. NIGHT.

Wilson in the back. Stares at the impenetrable name on the

driver's posted ID. Glances at the driver.

DRIVER glances back at his quiet passenger in the rearview

mirror.

CUT.

EXT. SMALL HOUSE. NIGHT.

Wilson walks up a cracked little path to the front door.

Lower middle-class street. Two cars in the driveway, one

behind the other. Lights on inside the house -- as he rings

the bell.

ED RAMA:

Answers it. Hispanic. Late 30's. Chairman Mao on his T-

shirt notwithstanding, an easygoing sort of fellow. Not

looking for any trouble -- anymore. But once did, and able

to handle himself if any shows up. Which it has.

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Lem Dobbs

Lem Dobbs (born Anton Lemuel Kitaj; 24 December 1959) is a British-American screenwriter, best known for the films Dark City (1998) and The Limey (1999). He was born in Oxford, England, and is the son of the painter, R.B. Kitaj. The nom de plume "Dobbs" was taken from the character played by Humphrey Bogart in The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1948). more…

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