Strangers on a Train script
Synopsis: In Alfred Hitchcock's adaptation of Patricia Highsmith's thriller, tennis star Guy Haines (Farley Granger) is enraged by his trampy wife's refusal to finalize their divorce so he can wed senator's daughter Anne (Ruth Roman). He strikes up a conversation with a stranger, Bruno Anthony (Robert Walker), and unwittingly sets in motion a deadly chain of events. Psychopathic Bruno kills Guy's wife, then urges Guy to reciprocate by killing Bruno's father. Meanwhile, Guy is murder suspect number one.

FADE IN:

EXT. UNION STATION, WASHINGTON, D.C. DAY

LONG SHOT THE CAPITOL DOME IN THE B.G. AND THE AUTOMOBILE

ENTRANCE TO THE STATION IN THE F.G. LOW CAMERA

Activity of cars and taxis arriving and discharging passengers

with luggage, busy redcaps, etcetera.

We FOCUS on a taxi pulling up and stopping, The driver hands

out modest looking luggage, including a bunch of tennis

rackets in cases to a redcap. CAMERA PANS DOWN as the

passenger gets out of the taxi so that we see only his shoes

and the lower part of his trousers. He is wearing dark

colored brogues and a conservative suit apparently. The

feet move toward, the entrance to the station and out of

scene. Immediately a chauffeur-driven limousine drives up

and an expensive place of airplane luggage is handed out of

this, and the passenger alighting from the back is seen to

be wearing black and white sport shoes which, as before, are

all we see of him. The sport shoes start off in the wake of

the brogues.

INT. STATION LOBBY

CAMERA FOLLOWS the sport shoes and the brogues across the

lobby into a passenger tunnel. There is the usual activity

of passengers walking to and from, a loud-speaker announcing

trains, etc.

EXT. PASSENGER TUNNEL

As the brogues and the sport shoes emerge to the train

platform, CAMERA PANS them over to the steps of the train.

INT. TRAIN

The brogues and the sport shoes pass separately down the

aisle, the sport shoes turning in at a compartment door and

the brogues continuing toward the parlor car.

DISSOLVE TO:

INT. PARLOR CAR (PROCESS)

The brogues come to rest before a chair as the owner sits

down. A moment later the sport shoes come to rest. before

in adjoining chair.

Converted to PDF by www.screentalk.org 2.

The legs belonging to the sport shoes stretch out, and one

of the shoes touches one of the brogues.

MAN'S VOICE (over scene)

Oh, excuse Me!

CAMERA PULLS BACK AND UP to SHOW two young men seated in two

parlor car chairs. BRUN0 ANTHONY, the wearer of the sport

shoes, is about twenty-five. He wears his expensive clothes

with the tweedy nonchalance of a young man who has always

had the best. The wearer of the brogues is a fine looking

but, at the moment, a somewhat troubled young man. This is

GUY HAINES. He, too, is in his middle twenties and is well

dressed because he can now afford to be. He nods politely,

acknowledging Bruno's apology, then turns away with the

gesture implying he wants privacy.

BRUNO:

(smiling with sudden

recognition)

I beg your pardon, but aren't you

Guy Haines.

Guy nods with a polite half smile. Being a well known

tournament tennis player, he has had this sort of experience

before.

BRUNO:

(snapping his finger)

Sure! I saw you blast Faraday right

off the court in South Orange last

season. What a backhand! Made the

semi-finals, didn't you?

Guy acknowledges this with a modest nod and turns to his

magazine rolled up in is fist.

BRUNO:

(with open admiration)

I certainly admire people who do

things.

(smiling and

introducing himself)

I'm Bruno Anthony. Bruno. See Guy

looks up. Bruno indicates his gold

tie pin which bears his name in cutout

letters. Guy looks at it with

the faintest expression of disdain.

I suppose you think it's corny. But

my mother gave it to me so of course

I wear it to please her.

Converted to PDF by www.screentalk.org 3.

GUY:

(patiently)(a faint

smile)

How do you do.

BRUNO:

(with an apologetic

grin)

I don't usually talk so much. Go

Ahead and read.

GUY:

(wryly)

Thanks.

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Raymond Chandler

Raymond Thornton Chandler (July 23, 1888 – March 26, 1959) was a British-American novelist and screenwriter. In 1932, at the age of forty-four, Chandler became a detective fiction writer after losing his job as an oil company executive during the Great Depression.  more…

All Raymond Chandler scripts | Raymond Chandler Books

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"Strangers on a Train" Scripts.com. STANDS4 LLC, 2017. Web. 19 Nov. 2017. <http://www.scripts.com/script/strangers_on_a_train_512>.

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