Mary Poppins script
Mary Poppins (1964)
Synopsis: The 1964 musical film based on the popular children's books by P.L. Travers about a magical nanny

MARY POPPINS:

FADE IN:

A LONG SHOT–DAY

of London. About 1910. A misty, romanticized aerial view of the magical old city, its landmarks gleaming in an occasional patch of late afternoon sun.

As camera pans slowly left, Fade on successively “Walt Disney Presents” title and starring titles. FADE OFF TITLES.

From a distant section of the city, rises a HUMAN FIGURE, sailing casually up and toward CAMERA. CAMERA MOVES FORWARD to meet the figure which is revealed as MARY POPPINS, an attractive, but plainly-dressed young woman. She floats imperturbably through the air, turning slowly one way, then the other, like an airborne cottonseed. She clings to the handle of her opened umbrella, in the manner of a strap-hanger in a streetcar. In her other hand, she carries a carpetbag.

She soars past camera, up and out of scene. Camera holds on London PANORAMA below for remainder of starring and featured player CREDIT TITLES.

AN AERIAL VIEW:

from another angle. Camera pans slowly left as remainder of credit titles fade on. As the last title fades off, Mary Poppins is revealed; coming into scene, settled comfortably on a cloud. She is looking at herself with satisfaction in a small hand mirror. Her umbrella is stuck into the cloud as though it were a snowbank, with the carpetbag alongside it.

ANOTHER ANGLE:

of Mary Poppins, as the umbrella and carpetbag begin to sink out of scene. Casually, she reaches down and brings them up again, without removing her gaze from the mirror. Camera moves back and away from Mary Poppins, panning down to reveal a PARK far below.

AN INTERMEDIATE SHOT

with the camera moving toward the square just outside the Park. It fronts on Cherry Tree Lane, a pleasant and modest residential street. There is a sound of music.

CLOSE ON BERT:

who is playing a mouth organ. Camera pulls back, revealing that Bert is performing upon an extraordinary ensemble of cymbals, whistles, tweeters, bulb-horns and drums in addition to the mouth organ, most of which are strapped to his person. In his hands is a small battered French concertina. On his toes are small, tinkling bells. Despite the encumbrances, he moves gracefully, and camera pans with him as he performs a dance step or two calculated to catch the interest of the passersby.

He is attracting a fairish crowd from the neighborhood children, a tradesman or two, and some strollers and shoppers. A POLICEMAN drifts onto the outer rim of the spectators.

MEDIUM CLOSE ON BERT

as he gestures to the gathering crowd, inviting them closer.

BERT:

Move a bit closer—there’s a love—Poems and witty sayings! Extemporized and thought up before your very eyes!

Camera moves in closer to hold on Bert.

BERT:

Comical poems suitable for the occasion—

(singing)

Room ’ere for everyone

Gather around—

MED. CLOSE ON POLICEMAN

who is surrounded by children, and a few grownups. He reacts to Bert’s song with a dour smile, as the onlookers laugh.

BERT:

(singing o.s.)

The constable’s responstable!

Now—‘ow does that sound?

MED. SHOT–BERT

He joins in the laughter. Camera moves with him as he approaches miss lark.

BERT:

(singing)

‘Ello, Miss Lark—

(as he joins her)

I’ve got one for you—

CLOSE ON MISS LARK

BERT:

(singing o.s.)

Miss Lark loves to wark

In the Park with An-drew!

MISS LARK reacts to this, smiling embarrassedly.

CLOSE ON ANDREW:

a small DOG, who stands at Miss Lark’s feet. He wears a Norfolk jacket, and a scarf, tucked Ascot-fashion, around the throat.

BERT:

(spoken o.s.)

’Ello there, Andrew!

andrew

Wuff!

CLOSE ON BERT:

BERT:

Ah, Mrs. Corry!

CLOSE ON MRS. CORRY

BERT:

(singing o.s.) A story for you!

CAMERA PULLS BACK to reveal two enormous daughters, ranged on either side of Mrs. Corry.

BERT:

(singing o.s.)

Your daughters were shorter than you—but they grew!

The crowd o.s. laughs.

MED. CLOSE–BERT

CAMERA PANS WITH him as he dances over to MISS PERSIMMON.

BERT:

(singing)

Dear Miss Persimmon, I—

CLOSE ON MISS PERSIMMON

A tall, vinegar-faced spinster leans forward, listening. She tries to conceal her pleasure at being singled out by Bert.

BERT:

(singing o.s.)

Dear Miss Persimmon—(he breaks off)

MISS PERSIMMON (eagerly)

Yes?

CLOSE ON BERT:

He pauses, looks around and up at the sky, his face gone wondering and gentle.

BERT:

(singing)

Wind’s in the east—

There’s a mist comin’ in—

Like somethin’ is brewin’

And ’bout to begin—

MED. CLOSE–SPECTATORS

as they react wonderingly to the sound of the wind. A scatter of leaves and cherry blossoms goes through scene.

CLOSE ON BERT:

BERT:

(singing softly, as though to himself)

Can’t put my finger on

What lies in store

But I feel wot’s to ’appen

All ’appened before—

MED. CLOSE–SPECTATORS

looking at Bert in puzzlement.

CLOSE ON BERT:

as he comes out of his reverie, and the wind dies away.

BERT:

(to his crowd)

Sorry! Where was I?

CAMERA MOVES BACK TO WIDER ANGLE, as Bert whacks into a rousing, headlong piece of music, concluding his performance with a RINGING cymbal smash. There is a smatter of APPLAUSE, and Bert removes his cap, shakes it out deftly and goes among the crowd.

MED. CLOSE–BERT

as he begins to move among the crowd.

BERT:

(holding out his cap)

Thank you, one and all, for your kind support!

WIDER ANGLE–SPECTATORS

as they start to LEAVE the SCENE.

MED. CLOSE–BERT AND MRS. CORRY

as she drops a few coins into his cap.

BERT:

Thank you, Mrs. Corry.

CAMERA PULLS BACK with Bert as he moves among the remaining spectators. A GENTLEMAN drops a coin into the cap.

BERT:

Bless you, Guv’nor.

The grin on Bert’s face dies away quickly, as he discovers he is inadvertently holding his cap out to the Policeman, who regards him sternly.

BERT:

(hurriedly) Sorry, no charge!

Bert moves away, eliciting a final coin from Miss Lark.

BERT:

Thank you kindly, Miss Lark. Generosity itself, that’s wot you are!

As she goes OUT, Bert next turns toward CAMERA, holding out the cap with the coins in it. He lowers the cap, smiling

BERT:

(to CAMERA) ’Ow. ’Ow, it’s you—’Ullo.

CLOSE ON BERT:

as he pockets the coins, puts the cap back on his head.

BERT:

(leaning in to CAMERA)

Number Seventeen Cherry Tree Lane, you say? Orl right. Just come along with me. (starts to turn)

REVERSE SHOT–WIDE ANGLE

SHOOTING toward Cherry Tree Lane, across from the square where Bert is standing.

BERT:

(points, as he picks up his gear) This ’ere is Cherry Tree Lane. Nice little spot, y’might say. Number Seventeen is just down a bit.

CAMERA MOVES WITH Bert, as he starts across the street, SHOOTING from the REAR, as he walks toward Cherry Tree Lane. The cymbals CLANG a little, and the drums BUMP as he walks.

WIDER ANGLE–BERT

as he stops in front of Admiral Boom’s house.

BERT:

(indicating the house) First, this imposin’ edifice wot greets the eye is the ‘ome of Admiral Boom, late of ‘is Majesty’s Royal Navy—

CAMERA MOVES PAST BERT, PANNING UP on Admiral Boom’s house. The higher it goes, the more nautical it becomes—with a dreadnought superstructure for a roof, signal flags in profusion, funnels instead of chimneys, a crow’s nest, and a cannon of gleaming brass, poking its snout over the parapet.

BERT:

(o.s.) Likes an ’ouse ship-shape, ’e does. Ship-shape and Bristol fashion.

CAMERA MOVES IN CLOSER to the roof-ship, as BINNACLE, a salty-looking figure, ENTERS SCENE. He is a minor naval rating, dressed in garb that combines regulation attire with garments of a faintly piratical cast. He takes out a bosun’s pipe.

CLOSER–THE ROOF-SHIP

as Binnacle stands at attention, and PIPES the Admiral aboard. ADMIRAL BOOM comes majestically INTO SCENE, and looks out over the city with an air of proprietorship. He produces a gold-encrusted watch on a chain, and holds it to his ear. He BANGS it impatiently on the railing to set it going.

ADMIRAL BOOM:

(to Binnacle) Time gun ready?

BINNACLE:

Ready and charged, sir.

ADMIRAL BOOM:

(checking his watch)

Three minutes, six seconds—

CLOSE ON BERT:

as he turns to the audience.

BERT:

Wot ’e’s famous for is punctuality. The ’ole world takes its time from Greenwich, but Greenwich, they say, takes its time from Admiral Boom. (looks up at roof-deck and calls) Wot cheer, Admiral!

UP ANGLE SHOT–ADMIRAL BOOM

and Binnacle on the roof-deck. The Admiral leans over the cannon and calls down to Bert.

ADMIRAL BOOM:

Good afternoon to you, young man. Where are you bound?

CLOSE ON BERT:

BERT:

(looking up and calling) Seventeen. Got some parties in tow ’ere wot want to see it.

CLOSE ON ADMIRAL BOOM AND BINNACLE.

ADMIRAL BOOM:

Number Seventeen. (turning to Binnacle) Enter that in the log.

BINNACLE:

Aye, aye, sir.

CLOSE ON ADMIRAL BOOM

ADMIRAL BOOM:

(leaning over the railing, calls to Bert) A word of advice, young man. Storm signals are up at Number Seventeen. Bit of heavy weather brewing there.

CLOSE ON BERT:

BERT:

(looking up at Admiral) Thank you, sir. I’ll keep an eye skinned.

Bert turns, winks at CAMERA and MOVES OFF.

MED. CLOSE–ADMIRAL BOOM AND BINNACLE

standing on the roof-deck on either side of the cannon. Binnacle has a glowing gunner’s match poised to touch to the cannon. The Admiral looks at his watch again, and holds up a pre-emptory hand.

ADMIRAL BOOM:

(tensely) Two minutes, forty-three seconds!

BINNACLE:

Aye, aye, sir!

A MOVING SHOT:

of Bert as he walks down Cherry Tree Lane. As he approaches Number Seventeen, he turns to audience and indicates the house.

BERT:

’Ere we are, Number Seventeen Cherry Tree Lane. Residence of George Banks, Esquire.

OFF SCENE, from inside the house, faintly comes the SOUND of SHOUTING. There is the SLAM of a door, a CRASH of dishes, and the clangour of pots and pans being SLAMMED about.

VOICE:

(o.s.)

Let ’er go! Let ’er go, that’s what I say! And good riddance! The old water buffalo! And glad I am to see the last of ’er!

SECOND VOICE:

(o.s.) No! Stop ’er! I’m not going to take the blame for wot ’appened! Out of the way!

There is another o.s. series of CRASHES. Bert raises his eyebrows, as he says to audience...

BERT:

’Ullo, ’Ullo, ’Ullo ! Admiral’s right. ’Eavy weather at Number Seventeen and no mistake.

CAMERA CONTINUES PAST Bert toward the house, and the SHOUTING INCREASES in volume.

FIRST VOICE:

(o.s.) And I say, you come to your senses or I’ll fetch you a box on the ear that will!

SECOND VOICE:

(o.s.) I’d like to see you try! I’d just like to see you try!

FIRST VOICE:

(o.s.) I will, so ’elp me! Now you stop your snivelin’ and get out of my kitchen!!

SECOND VOICE:

(o.s.) Don’t tell me wot to do! I don’t ’ave to take none of your sorce!

CAMERA MOVES UP CLOSER to front door of the Banks’ house, past the number “17” on the door post, as we

DISSOLVE TO:

INTERIOR–THE FRONT HALL

of the Banks’ house. MRS. BRILL, the cook, and ELLEN, the maid, COME THROUGH the kitchen door at the back of the hall, and advance toward the foot of the stairs in an erratic series of movements. (They have been the vocal adversaries.)

MRS, BRILL

Get away from them stairs! We don’t want no favors from ’er!

ELLEN:

Easy enough for, you to say! Warm and cozy out in the kitchen!

MRS. BRILL

I never liked ’er from the moment she set foot in that door!

ELLEN:

But ’oo gets stuck with the children with no Nanny in the ’ouse? Me, that’s ’oo!

MRS. BRILL

‘Er—with ‘er ‘igh and mighty ways—and the face of ‘er that would stop a coal barge, it would!

There is the SOUND of a door slam from upstairs, and Mrs. Brill and Ellen look up to see—

THEIR VIEW:

of KATIE NANNA, coming down the stairs, grim and thunderous. A formidable, large-bodied woman with a disagreeable expression.

ANOTHER ANGLE:

at the bottom of. the stairs—

ELLEN:

No ! No! Katie Nanna—don’t go!

Katie Nanna sweeps the protesting Ellen aside like a bit of chaff.

KATIE HANNA:

(loftily) I wouldn’t stay in this house another minute! Not if you heaped me with all the jewels in Christendom!

Ellen scuttles to the front door and stands in front of it.

MRS. BRILL

Let the old sow go!

KATIE NANNA:

(ignoring Mrs. Brill) Stand away from that door, my girl!

ELLEN:

(tearfully) Wot are we going to tell the Master about the children?

KATIE NANNA:

It’s no concern of mine! Those little beasts have run away from me for the last time!

ELLEN:

But they must be someplace? Did you look round the Zoo in the Park? You know ‘ow Jane and Michael is— (stops, stricken by a sudden thought) Coo! You don’t think the lion could have got at them, do you? You know ’ow fond they was of ’angin’ around the cage?

KATIE NANNA:

(thrusting her aside) I’ve said my say, and that’s all I’ll say. I’ve done with this house!

MRS. BRILL

Well–fip, lip, ‘ooray! And don’t stumble on one way out, dearie!

Mrs. Brill slams back into the kitchen.

ELLEN:

No, Katie Nanna! I won’t be able to face the Master and Missus!

AT THE DOOR:

Katie Nanna struggles to open the front door with Ellen clinging to her sleeve. From o.s. comes the SOUND of—

MRS. BANKS

(singing o.s.)

Cast off the shackles of yesterday—

Shoulder to shoulder into the fray—

ELLEN:

Mrs. Banks! She’s ’ome!

STREET EXTERIOR:

Mrs. Banks, striding smartly up the front walk to her door. An attractive woman, with a broad ribbon across her front. It spells forth “VOTES FOR WOMEN.”

MRS. BANKS

(singing)

Our daughters’ daughters

Will adore us

And they’ll sing

In grateful chorus,

Well done, sister suffragette!

She ENTERS the partially OPENED door—

INTERIOR HALL:

as she comes IN.

MRS. BANKS

(heartily) Good evening, Katie Nanna! Good evening, Ellen!

ELLEN:

Evening. Mum.

MRS. BANKS

What a glorious meeting! Simply inspiring! Mrs. Whitbourne-Allen chained herself to the wheel of the Prime Minister’s carriage! Oh—if you could only have seen it!

KATIE NANNA:

(grimly) Mrs. Banks—I would like a word with you—

MRS. BANKS

Mrs. Ainslie was dragged off to jail, singing and scattering pamphlets all the way!

KATIE NANNA:

(firmly) I’m glad you’re home, Madam. I’ve always given the best that’s in me—

During the course of the SONG, Cook returns to doorway. Mrs. Banks places ribbons on Mrs. Brill, Ellen and Katie Manna.

MRS. BANKS

Thank you, Katie Manna. How good to know you’re one of us!

(singing)

We’re clearly soldiers in petticoats

Dauntless crusaders for women’s votes

Though we adore men individually

We agree that as a group they’re rather stupid—

KATIE NANNA:

Mrs. Banks—

MRS. BANKS

(singing)

Cast off the shackles of yesterday

Shoulder to shoulder into the fray!

Our daughters’ daughters will adore us

And they’ll sing in grateful chorus

‘Well done!, sister suffragette!’

KATIE MANNA:

Be that as it may—

MRS. BANKS

(singing)

From Kensington to Billingsgate

One hears the restless cries

From ev’ry corner of the land

Womankind arise!

Political equality

And equal rights with men

Take heart, for Mrs. Pankhurst has

Been clapped in irons again!

No more the meek and mild subserviants, we

We’re fighting for our rights, militantly...

(spoken)

Never you fear!

KATIE NANNA:

If I may have a word, Madam...

MRS. BANKS

(singing)

So–cast off the shackles of yesterday

Shoulder to shoulder into the fray

Our daughters’ daughters will adore us

And they’ll sing in grateful chorus:

‘Well done! Well done! Well done, sister—

(cognizant at last, Katie Manna is trying to engage her attention)

What is it, Katie Manna?

KATIE NANNA:

Mrs. Banks, I have something to say to you—

MRS. BANKS

Where are the children?

KATIE N ANNA:

To be precise, Madam, the children are not here.

MRS. BANKS

In the nursery, surely?

KATIE MANNA:

They are not in the nursery. They have disappeared again.

MRS. BANKS

Katie Nanna–this is really too careless of you! Doesn’t this make the third time this week?

KATIE NANNA:

The fourth time, Madam, and I, for one, have had my fill of it. I’m not one to speak ill of the children, but—

MRS. BANKS

When do you expect them home?

KATIE N ANN A:

I really couldn’t say. Now if you will be good enough to compute my wages—-

MRS. BANKS

(panicking) Gracious. Katie Nanna. you’re not leaving! What will Mr. Banks say? He’s going to be cross as it is, to come home and find the children missing! (hurriedly removes her “VOTES FOR WOMEN” ribbon, and plucks them from the bosoms of the others) Ellen—put these away. You know how the Cause infuriates Mr. Banks!

ELLEN:

Yes, Mum.

CAMERA PANS ELLEN AWAY from the group to the hall closet. As she opens it to put the ribbons inside, more colored ribbons are REVEALED hanging from within. They indicate the extent of Mrs. Banks’ “causes”.

MRS. BANKS

(o.s.) Katie Nanna. I implore you to reconsider! Think of the children! And Mr. Banks—he was just beginning to get used to you!

INSERT:

of the hall clock. An ominous stretching and cracking SOUND comes from within it. A shreik from Ellen o.s.

ELLEN:

(running) Posts, everyone!

ADMIRAL BOOM’S ROOFTOP

Admiral Boom is poised. with upflung hand, ready to give the order to fire off the cannon. Binnacle is ready to apply the gunner’s match to the touch-hole.

ADMIRAL BOOM:

(gazing at his watch) Five seconds–Four!–Three!

IN THE HALL:

Mrs. Banks, Ellen and Mrs. Brill fan OUT into the front room. Katie Nanna remains immobile in the hall, holding her suitcase, watching grimly.

IN THE LIVING ROOM

Ellen runs OUT of SCENE, CAMERA LEFT. Mrs. Brill runs OUT OF SCENE, CAMERA RIGHT. Mrs. Banks turns to left just inside the doorway arch, and seizes statue on pedestal–just as the o.s. BOOM from Admiral Boom’s gun SOUNDS. Pictures on the wall, the statue, scarf on the piano–vase on the piano JUMP. The piano begins to MOVE OUT OF SCENE to CAMERA LEFT. The toppled vase rolls off piano lid as it does, and Mrs. Banks catches it with practised dexterity.

ELLEN:

at the corner china cabinet. The china is rocking from the SOUND of the cannon in the PREVIOUS SCENE. She steadies them. Piano ROLLS IN from RIGHT. Ellen shoves it back OUT OF SCENE with her foot. Wall pictures are awry.

MRS. BRILL

leaning against a bibelot cabinet in the other corner of the room, steadying–it, one arm around a goldfish bowl on a pedestal. A vase topples off one end of the cabinet, and she catches it neatly with the toe of her shoe.

MRS. BANKS

without looking behind, replaces her vase on the piano. as it ROLLS BACK INTO SCENE.

ELLEN:

bangs the wall with her fist, and all the awry pictures return to their former position.

MRS. BANKS

straightens the picture on her wall, .casually. Then goes into the hall to resume her conversation with Katie Nanna.

MRS. BANKS

Katie Nanna, I beseech you—

KATIE MANNA:

(firmly) My wages, if you please!

EXTERIOR–CHERRY TREE LANE

MR. BANKS. a fine-looking man with a pleasant sense of assurance, comes through the Park gates, approaching his home. He wears a small rose in his buttonhole, a bowler, any swings a tightly furled umbrella in the classic manner. He is in extremely good spirits, light-footing it across the street, and whistling. He looks up to Admiral Boom’s rooftop o.s.

MR. BANKS

(calling) Bit early tonight, aren’t you, Admiral Boom?

ADMIRAL BOOM:

looking DOWN from a position next to his smoking cannon. Binnacle is swabbing it out.

ADMIRAL BOOM:

Nonsense! Bang-on-the dot, as usual! How are things in the world of finance?

CLOSE ON MR. BANKS

MR. BANKS

(gaily) Never better! Money is sound! Credit rates are moving up–up–up! The British pound is the admiration of the world.

CLOSE ON ADMIRAL BOOM

ADMIRAL BOOM:

Good man!

CLOSE ON MR. BANKS

MR. BANKS

How do things look from where you stand?

CLOSE ON ADMIRAL BOOM

ADMIRAL BOOM:

Bit chancey, I’d say. (raises a finger) Wind’s cornin’ up, and the glass is falling! Don’t like the look of it!

MED. CLOSE–MR. BANKS

as he continues on his way.

MR. BANKS

(mechanically, not quite listening) Good! Good! Good!

MED. CLOSE–ADMIRAL BOOM

as he leans over the side of the roof-deck and calls after Mr. Banks.

ADMIRAL BOOM:

Banks! Shouldn’t wonder if you weren’t steering into a nasty piece of weather! Banks! Do you hear me?—

WIDER ANGLE–MR. BANKS

As he approaches his house, whistling merrily, he sees a hansom cab waiting at the curb. He turns up the front walk and sees Katie Nanna EMERGING from the house. CAMERA PANS her down the front walk, where she encounters Mr. Banks. He lifts his hat politely and reaches for her bags.

MR. BANKS

Those must be quite heavy, Katie Nanna. Permit me!

She gets INTO the cab, and Mr. Banks places the luggage in the vehicle with her. He lifts his hat again as the cab drives OFF.

MED. SHOT–MR. BANKS

Whistling again, he heads up the walk to the front door. Concludes his whistling passage.

INTERIOR:

of the front hall, as Ellen opens the door to admit Mr. Banks. He removes his bowler and gloves.

MR. BANKS

(singing)

I feel a surge of deep satisfaction

Much as a king astride his noble steed.

(hands the bowler, gloves and umbrella to Ellen) Thank you.

(singing)

When I return from daily strife

To hearth and wife

(he gives Mrs. Banks, who comes IN, a fleeting kiss)

How pleasant is the life I lead—

Ellen goes OUT of scene.

MRS. BANKS

(troubled) Dear—it’s about the children.

MR. BANKS

(singing on imperturbably)

I run my home precisely on schedule

At six-oh-one, I march through my door

My slippers, sherry and pipe are due

At six-oh-two,

Consistent is the life I lead.

Mr. Banks strolls OUT of SCENE.into living room, Mrs. Banks hurrying after him.

INT. LIVING ROOM

as the Banks come IN.

MRS. BANKS

George, they’re missing!

MR. BANKS

(not quite hearing, he is savoring the words of his song) Splendid! Splendid!

(singing)

It’s grand to be an Englishman in nineteen-ten,

King Edward’s on the throne, it’s the

Age of men—

Mr. Banks leans casually on trie mantel, after taking his glass of sherry from a silver tray—

MR. BANKS

(singing)

I’m the lord of my castle The sovereign, the liege

(spoken) I treat my subjects,

Servants, wife, children

With a firm but gentle hand.

Noblesse oblige!—

(He slopes into his easy chair)

(singing)

It’s six-oh-three and

The heirs to my dominion

Are scrubbed and tubbed

And adequately fed

And so, I’ll pat them on the head

And send them off to bed

Ah, lordly is the life I lead!

Mr. Banks turns to greet his children. They are of course not present.

MR. BANKS

(agitated) The children! Michael! Jane! iraf a3’. Where are my children?

MRS. BANKS

George—he children aren’t here.

MR. BANKS

Preposterous! Of course they’re here! Where else would they be?

MRS. BANKS

I don’t know, dear.

Mr. Banks leaps out of his chair, CAMERA PANS HIM to the telephone on the wall in the hall

MR. BANKS

Don’t know?

MRS. BANKS

They simply haven’t returned! Katie Nanna looked everywhere!

ANOTHER ANGLE:

in the hall. Mr. Banks cranks the handle determinedly.

MR. BANKS

Very well! I’ll deal with this myself! (into the phone) Give me the police station! Quickly, please!

MRS. BANKS

I don’t know that we should bother the police, dear. The facts of the matter are—

MR. BANKS

Kindly do not attempt to cloud the issue with facts. One fact—and one alone—remains crystal clear. Katie Nanna has faltered at her post–she has let the family down, and I shall bring her to book without further— (pauses, the wind going out of his sails) Oh—she’s gone, hasn’t she?

MRS. BANKS

Yes, George. Only just.

MR. BANKS

(into phone) Yes–George Banks here. Seventeen Cherry Tree Lane. It’s a matter of some urgency—

There is a RING at the front.door. Mrs. Banks goes.

MR. BANKS

(on the phone) I should like a policeman sent round immediately—

Mrs. Banks opens the door to reveal POLICE CONSTABLE JONES, a large, hulking man.

MRS. BANKS

The policeman is here, George.

MR. BANKS

He is? (into phone) Thank you. Thank you. Splendid response. Good night.

Mr. Banks puts up the phone and turns to Constable Jones.

MR. BANKS

Come in, Constable. Come in.

CONSTABLE JONES:

Thank you, sir. While going about my duties near High Holborn, I noted some valuables that had gone astray. I believe they’re yours, sir.

MR. BANKS

Valuables?

From behind him, each clinging to a giant hand, the Constable draws forth two children. JANE BANKS, aged eight, and MICHAEL BANKS, aged six. Michael carries a battered kite.

MRS. BANKS

(relieved) Jane! Michael!

She moves toward them, but Mr. Banks raises a hand.

MR. BANKS

Winifred! No emotionalism, please!

CONSTABLE JONES:

I wouldn’t be too ’ard on them, sir. They’ve ’ad a long, weary walk today.

MR. BANKS

(to the children) Will you come here, please?

Jane and Michael slowly advance, Michael still carrying the remnants of the kite.

JANE:

I’m sorry we lost Katie Manna, Father.

MICHAEL:

The kite got away from us—

CONSTABLE JONES:

You see., sir, in a manner of speaking, it was the kite that ran away. Not the children.

MR. BANKS

(coldly) Thank you, Constable. I believe I can manage this.

Michael holds the kite out to his father.

JANE:

Actually, it isn’t a very good kite, Father. We made it ourselves—

MICHAEL:

(brightening) Maybe if you helped build one—

CONSTABLE JONES:

That’s the ticket, sir! Kites are skittish things. Last week, with my own youngsters, I—

Mr. Banks takes the kite from Michael and throws it on the desk.

MR. BANKS

I’m grateful to you, Constable, for returning the children. I’m sure if you go to the kitchen, Cook will find you a plate of something.

CONSTABLE JONES:

(coldly) Thank you, sir. I’ll be returning to my duties.

JANE:

Thank you, Constable.

The Constable smiles at the children, the smile fading as he looks up to Mr. Banks.

CONSTABLE JONES:

Good night, sir.

And he goes OUT.

MRS. BANKS

I’m terribly sorry about all this, George. I expect you’ll want to discuss it. (rings bell lever on wall)

MR. BANKS

Discuss it? With whom? The children? After all, they’re not quite persons yet, are they? (as Ellen comes in) Ellen—take Jane and Michael upstairs straightaway.

Mr. Banks GOES INTO living room, followed by Mrs. Banks. Ellen herds Jane and Michael UP the stairs.

ELLEN:

(grumbling) I knew it! When all’s said and done, ’oo bears the brunt of everything around ’ere? Me–that’s ’oo! Like I don’t ’ave enough to do. They don’t want an ’onest ’ard-working girl around ’ere–they want a ruddy zoo-keeper!

DISSOLVE:

THE LIVING ROOM–NIGHT

Mr. Banks is pacing restlessly back and forth, Mrs. Banks watching him anxiously. Mr. Banks is wearing his smoking jacket now. He puffs his pipe furiously.

MRS. BANKS

I am sorry, dear. When I engaged Katie Nanna, I thought she would be firm with the children. She looked so wonderfully solemn and cross.

MR. BANKS

Never confuse a liver complaint with efficiency.

MRS. BANKS

I’ll try to do better next time.

MR. BANKS

Next time? My dear—you have engaged six nannies in the past four months, and they’ve all been unqualified disasters!

MRS. BANKS

I quite agree.

MR. BANKS

Choosing a nanny for the children is an important and delicate task. It requires insight, balance, judgment, and ability to read character. Under the circumstances, it may be apropos to take it upon myself to select the next person—

MRS. BANKS (relieved)

Oh, George—would you?

MR. BANKS

Obviously the way to find a proper nanny is to go about it in a proper fashion. I shall place an advertisement in the Times. Take this down, please.

Mrs. Banks sits down to her desk and takes up pen in readiness.

MR. BANKS

Required–Nanny–Firm–Respectable—No nonsense—

(singing)

A British nanny must be a general

The future Empire lies within her hands

And so the person that we need

To mould the breed

Is a nanny who can give commands.

(to his wife)

Are you getting this, Winifred?

MRS. BANKS

Oh, yes dear. Every word.

MR. BANKS

(resumes singing song)

A British bank is run with precision

A British home requires nothing less

Tradition, discipline and rules

Must be the tools

Without them–disorder! Catastrophe! Anarchy! In short, you have a ghastly mess!

MRS. BANKS

(writing furiously away) Splendid, George! Inspirational!! The Times will be so pleased!

Pacing, Mr. Banks turns to see Jane and Michael in their nightclothes, at the door.

MR . BANKS

Yes?

Michael and Jane come in. Jane has a sheet of writing paper in her hand.

MR. BANKS

Well?

JANE:

Michael and I have discussed everything. Were very sorry about what we did today.

MR. BANKS

I should certainly think so!

JANE:

It was wrong to run away from Katie Nanna.

MR. BANKS

It was indeed!

JANE:

And we do so want to get on with the new nanny.

MR. BANKS

Very sensible. I shall be glad to have your help in this matter.

JANE:

Thank you, Father. That’s why Michael and I wrote this advertisement.

MR. BANKS

Advertisement? For what?

JANE:

For the new nanny.

MRS. BANKS

George, I think we ought to listen.

JANE:

You said you wanted our help.

MR. BANKS

But—oh, very well!

JANE:

Wanted–A Nanny For Two Adorable Children.

MR. BANKS

Adorable! That’s debatable, I must say.

JANE:

(singing)

If you want this choice position

Have a cheery disposition

Rosy cheeks, no warts—

MICHAEL:

That’s the part I put in!

MR. BANKS

(exasperated) Well—Really!

MRS. BANKS

(hushing him)

George!

JANE:

(singing)

Play games–all sorts

You must be kind

You must be witty

Very sweet and very pretty

Take us on outings–give us treats

Sing songs–bring sweets—

MR. BANKS

There! You see? The entire thing is preposterous!

Mrs. Banks looks warningly at him—and he subsides.

JANE:

(singing)

Never be cross or cruel

Never feed us castor oil or gruel

Love us as a son and daughter

And never smell of barley water—

MICHAEL:

I put that in, too.

MR. BANKS

MRS. BANKS

Ssssh:
Do be quiet, dear!

JANE:

(singing)

If you won’t scold and dominate us

We will never give you cause to hate us

We won’t hide your spectacles, so you can’t see

Put toads in your bed

Or pepper in your tea

Hurry, Nanny

Many thanks

Sincerely—

MICHAEL AND JANE

Jane and Michael Banks.

MR. BANKS

Thank you. Most interesting.

Mr. Banks puts out his hand for the sheet of paper with the advertisement written on it. Jane hands it to him.

MR. BANKS

Now, I think we’ve had quite enough of this nonsense. Good night, children. Please return to the nursery.

JANE:

Good night.

MICHAEL:

Good night.

Crestfallen, the children go out.

MRS. BANKS

They wanted to help. They’re just children.

MR. BANKS

I’m aware they’re children, Winifred. I only congratulate myself I decided to step in and take a hand! (glancing at the children’s advertisement, then slowly tearing it up) Give treats! Sing songs! Play games! Ridiculous!

He throws the pieces into the cold fireplace. Then goes to the telephone.

MR. BANKS

There’s no question in my mind whatsoever! Now is the time for action!

ANGLE INTO FIREPLACE

The bits of paper begin to STIR in the fireplace—

MR. BANKS

at the telephone.

MR, BANKS

Will you give me ‘The Times’ please?

ANGLE IN THE FIREPLACE

A sudden, mysterious WIND picks up the torn bits of paper with a gentle whooshing SOUND, and sends them hurtling up the chimney.

MRS. BANKS

(o.s.) You’re always so forceful, dear.

MR. BANKS

(o.s.) The Times? This is George Banks of Seventeen Cherry Tree Lane. I wish to place an advertisement in your columns.

EXT. TOP OF CHIMNEY

The torn scraps of paper EMERGE from the chimneytop and soar upwards. CAMERA PANS UP with the scraps of paper, as they whirl UPWARDS into the moonlit night.

DISSOLVE:

EXT. ADMIRAL BOOM’ S WEATHER VANE–DAY

Next morning. The wind, which has been whipping briskly from the WEST, begins to falter. The vane turns slowly, and a new breeze comes on strongly from the EAST—

There is the SOUND of the bosun’s WHISTLE o.s.

CAMERA PANS DOWN to reveal Admiral Boom being piped aboard the roof deck of his house. Binnacle stands at attention.

ADMIRAL BOOM:

I’ll take the report, Mr. Binnacle.

BINNACLE:

Wind has changed, sir. Appears to be blowing from a new quarter—

Admiral Boom squints up toward the vane—

ADMIRAL BOOM:

So it is. Time gun ready?

BINNACLE:

(ready with gunner’s match for the cannon) Primed and ready, sir. (looking o.s.) Sir?

ADMIRAL BOOM:

What is it?

BINNACLE:

Bit of something or other taking place off the starboard beam, sir!

CLOSE ON ADMIRAL BOOM

as he looks over the side toward the Banks’ house.

HIS VIEW–DOWN SHOT

A queue of grim-faced applicants for the job of Nanny are lined up to the door and down the sidewalk. They are a somber, unattractive group, all looking very much alike, with the same drab clothes, the same dank hair screwed up under a dingy bonnet. Each has a copy of the London Times tucked under her arm. They stand silently, waiting the stroke of eight o’clock.

ADMIRAL BOOM:

(o.s.) Ghastly-looking crew, I must say.

EXT. WINDOW–BANKS’ HOUSE–MED. CLOSE–ELLEN

who is looking out the window at the side of the front door.

HER VIEW:

of the stern, immobile faces standing in line.

MED. CLOSE–ELLEN

as she grimaces, turns from the window and goes INTO the dining room.

INT. DINING ROOM

Mr. and Mrs. Banks are breakfasting as Ellen comes in.

ELLEN:

There’s a fair good queue of ‘em out there, sir. Shall I send ’em in now?

MR. BANKS

Certainly not! I said eight o’clock, and eight o’clock it shall jolly well be! (takes out his watch

to consult it–he stands up, lifting his coffee cup from its saucer) Yes–eight seconds to go. Six–five—

MRS. BANKS

Posts! Please! Three–two—

Mrs. Brill flashes through the dining room on her way INTO the living room. Mrs.Baanks and Ellen both EXIT hastily to the living room to take up their stations.

There is a thundering BOOM! of the Admiral’s cannon next door. The Banks’ house QUIVERS, there is the SOUND of the piano BANGING around in the living room o.s.

THE CAMERA is FEATURING Mr. Banks. The table in front of him gives a convulsive tremor. The curtains shudder behind him. The china cabinet doors swing back and forth. His chair, and the fern in the pot in the window bay to his rear give a noticeable twitch. The chandelier over his head sways back and forth. The table shimmers away from beneath his hand.

Mr. Banks sways back and forth, with dignity, like a sea captain on a stormy bridge.. The table shimmers BACK into its former position. He puts the coffee cup down in its exact former position.

MR. BANKS

Ellen, it is now eight o’clock.

ELLEN:

positioned against the china cabinet in the front room nearby. The piano has come across the room and is resting on her hip. With a flip of her derriere, Ellen propels it OUT OF SCENE back to its proper position.

ELLEN:

Yes, sir.

IN THE DINING ROOM

Mr. Banks turns and glances at himself in the still SWAYING mirror, adjusting his tie. He sways gently to keep in line with the mirror.

MR. BANKS

You may show them in–one at a time!

ELLEN:

steadying the cabinet once again, and going OUT—

ELLEN:

Yes, sir.

EXT. NURSERY WINDOW–JANE AND MICHAEL

looking down disconsolately at the queue of nannies.

MICHAEL:

They’re horrible!

JANE:

(turning away) I don’t understand. They’re not what we advertised for at all.

THEIR VIEW–DOWN SHOT

of the queue of nannies. A sudden WIND starts up.

EXT—NURSERY WINDOW–JANE AND MICHAEL

Michael is leaning out the window, pointing excitedly.

MICHAEL:

Jane! Look!

Jane turns quickly, and leans out the window—

THEIR VIEW–DOWN ANGLE–QUEUE OF NANNIES

on the front sidewalk. They are being severely buffeted by the wind. Their hats, papers and bags are blown away, and a couple of umbrellas are blown open and ripped apart. It is a scene of wild confusion.

CLOSER–THE NANNIES

They are desperately fighting the wind. Suddenly, a couple of the nannies begin to rise off the ground.

CLOSE ON ANDREW:

the dog, who has been watching interestedly from behind a post. He pulls back behind the post fearfully, as he sees—

HIS VIEWPOINT–THE NANNIES

as they begin to blow away.

A WIDER ANGLE–THE NANNIES

blowing THROUGH SCENE. One clings desperately to the fence railing, but she too is blown away.

EXT. NURSERY WINDOW–JANE AND MICHAEL

looking down, watching the drama below.

THEIR VIEW–THE NANNIES

as they are being blown AWAY.

EXT. NURSERY WINDOW–JANE AND MICHAEL

Michael points upward, as the two children watch the flight of the departing nannies.

THEIR VIEW:

of the nannies being blown over the treetops and up over the city, disappearing into the distance.

EXT. NURSERY WINDOW–JANE AND MICHAEL

Jane is still watching the nannies. Michael is looking out toward the Park. Suddenly he points.

MICHAEL:

(excitedly) Jane—look!

JANE:

Where?

MICHAEL:

(pointing) Over the trees!

THEIR VIEW:

looking toward the Park. Across the trees, a FIGURE appears to be blowing toward them. As it grows in size, we begin to recognize Mary Poppins, clinging to her opened umbrella.

EXT. NURSERY WINDOW–JANE AND MICHAEL

as they watch the approaching figure.

MICHAEL:

Do you suppose it’s a witch?

JANE:

Of course not Witches have brooms!

THEIR VIEW:

of Mary Poppins. She floats through thè air, swinging gently back and forth as she clings to the umbrella handle. Despite the wind, which is blowing her like a parachutist to the Banks’ household, her clothes are unruffled, and her hair unmussed. She is elaborately unperturbed.

REVERSE TO MARY POPPINS

as she floats across the street, crossing the now deserted front walk and up onto the front porch.

CLOSE ON JANE AND MICHAEL

staring out of the nursery window.

JANE:

It’s she! It’s the person! She answered our advertisement! Rosy cheeks and everything!

ANGLE TO FRONT PORCH

Mary Poppies comes in for a graceful landing, puts down her carpetbag, closes her umbrella, and tucks it under her arm. We have a view of the umbrella handle–the carved head of a jaded, choleric-looking parrot. She pulls the doorbell chord.

THE FRONT HALL:

Ellen opens the door to REVEAL Mary Poppins.

ELLEN:

You may come in. One at a time.

MARY POPPINS:

Thank you!

Mary Poppins moves past Ellen and into the living room, OUT OF SCENE. HOLD ON Ellen a moment as she looks out the door, puzzled by the deserted front walk.

INT. LIVING ROOM

as Mary Poppins comes IN. Mr. Banks is poised at the mantel, filling his pipe with a firm, executive air. He starts to speak—

MR. BANKS

Now then—

MARY POPPINS:

You are the father of Jane and Michael Banks, are you not? (she produces a paper from her bag)

Mr. Banks frowns. She is not quite what he expected, nor had he expected her to speak so forthrightly.

MR. BANKS

Ah—you brought your references. May I see them? T—

MARY POPPINS:

(unfolding the paper, looks over the top of it, and says haughtily) I make it a rule never to give references.

A very old-fashioned idea, to my mind.

MR. BANKS

Indeed? We’ll just have to see about— (he pauses, looking at the paper in her hand—it is the advertisement written by Jane and Michael, but pasted into a single piece)

MARY POPPINS:

The qualifications. Item One–A cheery disposition. I am never cross. Item Two–Rosy cheeks–Obviously. Item Three—

MR. BANKS

Excuse me. May I? (He takes the paper from her hand, and stares at it) But how did you get this? I tore it up!

Mary Poppins takes the paper out of Mr. Banks’ hand.

MARY POPPINS:

(continuing) Item Three–I’m sure the children will find my games extremely diverting. (She pauses to look at Mr. Banks, who is crouched over, looking up the chimney) Have you lost something?

Mr. Banks looks up quickly, banging his head on the mantel.

KR. BANKS

Ow! Confound it! No! That is— yes! That paper—I thought I had—

MARY POPPINS:

You are–George Banks–are you not?

MR. BANKS

Of course I am! But who are—

MARY POPPINS:

And you did advertise for a nanny, did you not?

MR . BANKS

Yes—

MARY POPPINS:

Very well then. Item Four–I am kind but extremely firm— (She stops again as she sees Mr. Banks trying to reconstruct in pantomime what he did with the paper. He tore it up—and threw it in the fireplace.)

MARY POPPINS:

I beg your pardon. Are you ill?

MR. BANKS

(caught in the act) Of course not—I just—

MARY POPPINS:

The reference here to my wages is very obscure.

MR. BANKS

Now just a moment—

MARY POPPINS:

We must be very clear on that point, mustn’t we?’.

MR. BANKS

Yes— I suppose so, but—

MARY POPPINS:

I shall require every second Tuesday off.

Mr. Banks is circling Mary Poppins, staring at her. She stands ner ground, saying:

MARY POPPINS:

On further thought, I believe a trial period might be wise—

MR. BANKS

A trial period? I don’t think—

MARY POPPINS:

I’ll give you one week. I should know by then.

MR. BANKS

(completely baffled) You should know?

Mary Poppins folds up the advertisement, pops it in her bag and snaps it shut.

MARY POPPINS:

I’ll see the children now.

She turns on her heel and walks through the door.

CLOSE:

on Mr. Banks. His face is a picture of frustration.

MR. BANKS

But–-

INT. BANKS’ HOUSE–HALL

Mary Poppins walks to foot of stairs–looks up.

HER VIEW:

Michael and Jane looking down througn the railings of the first floor landing.

THEIR VIEW:

of Mary Poppins at the foot of the stairs, as she gracefully hops onto the bannister, adjusting her carpetbag and umbrella in her hand.

CLOSE ON JANE AND MICHAEL

peeking through the railings, a look of puzzlement on their faces.

THEIR VIEW:

of Mary Poppins as she starts to slide UP the bannister to the landing where the children are.

CLOSE ON JANE AND MICHAEL

who stare through the railings, transfixed.

THEIR VIEW:

of Mary Poppins as she continues on up the bannister, nearing the landing.

MED. CLOSE–JANE AND MICHAEL

as they pull away from the bannister in awe, huddling together against the landing wall.

WIDER ANGLE–JANE AND MICHAEL

huddling against the wall, as Mary Poppins SLIDES INTO SCENE on the bannister.

131 CLOSE ON MARY POPPINS

MARY POPPINS:

(looking down at the children, sternly) Close your mouth, Michael. You are not a codfish.

She hops off the bannister.

CLOSE ON JANE AND MICHAEL

The children are too surprised to say anything. Michael closes his mouth, but both children continue to stare as Mary Poppins passes in front of them.

WIDER ANGLE–ON THE LANDING

Mary Poppins passes in front of the children, as they stand staring at her.

MARY POPPINS:

(severely) Don’t stand there staring. I’m not a grizzly gorilla.

The children turn to look at her.

MARY POPPINS:

Best foot forward! Spit spot!

Almost against their own will, they turn and march off obediently, up the stairs to the nursery on the top floor.

IN THE STUDY:

Mr. Banks is crouching at the fireplace, peering up into the chimney again, as Mrs. Banks comes into the room.

MRS. BANKS

George!

Mr. Banks involuntarily raises his head, and bangs it against the bricks again.

MR . BANKS

Ow!

MRS. BANKS

What on earth are you doing? I thought you were interviewing nannies?

MR. BANKS

(groggily) I did.

MRS. BANKS

You mean, you selected one already?

MR. BANKS

Yes, yes. It’s all over.

MRS. BANKS

Well–where is she?

MR. BANKS

Where? Oh. Upstairs in the nursery. Of course. I put her straightaway to work.

MRS. BANKS

How clever of you, George. (tucking her arm cosily in his) I’d have muddled the whole thing. Tell me—is she everything we hoped she’d be?

MR. BANKS

(dimly) Well—it all happened so quickly. I—

MRS. BANKS

(quoting her husband) Is she firm? Will she give commands? Will she mould our young breed?

Mr. Banks stares at her and his face begins to lighten—

MR. BANKS

You know? I think she will! (he smiles) Yes! Ha–ha! I think she will!

MRS. BANKS

In that case, perhaps you’d better tell Ellen to dismiss the others.

MR. BANKS

Oh–the others. Yes, of course! (calling) Ellen!

ELLEN:

(appearing a bit too quickly) Sir?

MR. BANKS

Tell the other applicants they may go. The position has been filled.

ELLEN:

(blankly) The others, sir?

MR. BANKS

Yes, yes, yes, the others! Confound it, Ellen, how many nannies do you think we need in this house?

Ellen scurries to the door.

CLOSER SHOT–OVER ELLEN’S SHOULDER

As she opens the door, no one is on the front walk, save for Andrew, the small, seated dog, who looks up curiously.

REVERSE:

to Ellen. She looks out, says to the dog:

ELLEN:

The position has been filled.

CLOSER:

The dog turns and goes.

ELLEN:

closes the door.

IN THE NURSERY:

Mary Poppins is standing in the center of the room, looking around with a critical eye. The room is in disarray.. Toys and clothes are littered about.

JANE:

(apologetically) I’m afraid the nursery’s not very tidy.

MARY POPPINS:

It is rather like a bear pit, isn’t it?

Jane indicates another, smaller room, adjoining the nursery and leads the way.

MICHAEL:

(indicating carpetbag) That’s a funny sort of bag.

MARY POPPINS:

Carpet.

MICHAEL:

To carry carpets in, you mean?

MARY POPPINS:

No. Made of.

As they go through a pair of double doors—

JANE:

This is your room. It has a lovely view of the Park.

Mary Poppins puts her bag and umbrella down, and looks around.

MARY POPPINS:

(surveying the room) Hmmmnm.

MED. CLOSE–MICHAEL

as he reaches out to touch Mary Poppins umbrella. CAMERA MOVES IN CLOSER ON the parrot’s head handle, and we see the parrot’s eyes are closed.

CLOSE–PARROT’S HEAD

as Michael’s hand comes INTO SCENE to touch the parrot’s head. The parrot suddenly opens his eyes, and throws a warning glance in Michael’s direction. Michael quickly draws back his hand. During above—

JANE:

(o.s.) I’m afraid the room is rather plain.

CLOSE ON MICHAEL

as he reacts in amazement to the parrot’s head.

MARY POPPINS:

(o.s.) On the contrary. It’s quite suitable.

MED. CLOSE–MARY POPPINS

She removes her hat as she continues to look about the room.

MARY POPPINS:

Just needs a touch here and there.

WIDER ANGLE–MARY POPPINS ROOM

Mary Poppins walks to the table where she has placed her carpetbag. The children stand watching her, wonderingly.

MARY POPPINS:

Let me see? First things first.

She opens the carpetbag, and before Jane and Michael’s astonished eyes, pulls out a hatrack.

MARY POPPINS:

(pulling out the hatrack) I always say the proper place to hang a hat is on a hatrack.

MED. CLOSE–JANE AND MICHAEL

As Mary Poppins moves out of scene to place the hatrack in a corner, Jane and Michael lean forward anxiously and look inside the carpetbag, only to find it empty. Michael picks up the bag and turns it upside down.

MED. CLOSE–MARY POPPINS

She hangs up her hat and scarf on the hatrack, and then turns to look into a small mirror hanging on the wall.

MARY POPPINS:

(looking in the mirror) Oh, this will never do—

WIDER ANGLE–GROUP SHOT

as Mary Poppins goes back to the carpetbag.

MARY POPPINS:

I much prefer seeing all my face at the same time.

As the children watch, she lifts the bag over closer to her and removes a large, gilt-edged mirror.

CLOSE ON JANE AND MICHAEL

MICHAEL:

(in astonishment to Jane) But there was nothing in it!

MED. CLOSE–MARY POPPINS

She has hung the mirror over the chest of drawers, and is touching at her hair as she looks at her reflection appreciatively.

MARY POPPINS:

Never judge things by their appearance. Even carpetbags. I never do.

CLOSE ON JANE AND MICHAEL

as they stare at Mary Poppins, dumbfounded.

WIDER ANGLE–GROUP SHOT

Mary Poppins has moved back to the table and her carpetbag. As Jane looks on, Michael crawls under the table to examine the underside of it. During this Mary Poppins reaches into the carpetbag and removes a large rubber plant. She carries it out of scene as Jane and Michael watch.

MED. CLOSE JANE AND MICHAEL

Michael is still under the table, and he and Jane look after Mary Poppins with astonishment.

MED . CLOSE–MARY POPPINS

as she places the rubber plant near the window, and stands back to study it critically.

MARY POPPINS:

Hmmm. A little more light perhaps.

WIDER ANGLE–GROUP SHOT

as Mary Poppins moves back to the carpetbag, and removes a lighted floor lamp, which she carries over near the rubber plant. Michael comes out from under the table, and joins Jane.

CLOSE ON JANE AND MICHAEL

JANE:

(aside to Michael) She’s wonderful!

MICHAEL:

(unconvinced) I don’t know—she’s tricky—

CLOSE ON MARY POPPINS

as she puts the lamp down near the rubber plant.

WIDER ANGLE–GROUP SHOT

Mary Poppins reaches into her carpetbag again, searching for something, as Michael once again goes under the table.

MARY POPPINS:

(removing various items from the carpetbag as she searches) Now where did I put my tape measure? (She produces a coiled measuring tape) Let’s see how you two measure up!

CLOSE ON MARY POPPINS

as she holds up the coiled tape measure.

MARY POPPINS:

Now, stand over there...

MED. CLOSE–JANE AND MICHAEL

Jane does what Mary Poppins asks willingly. Michael grudgingly goes to stand next to his sister, as Mary Poppins comes over to measure them.

MARY POPPINS:

Head up, Michael. Don’t slouch.

Mary Poppins measures Michael from head to toe.

MED. CLOSE–MARY POPPINS

as she reads off the tape. The children stand watching her.

MARY POPPINS:

Just as I thought...extremely stubborn and suspicious.

REVERSE SHOT–MICHAEL AND JANE

Michael looks indignantly at the measuring tape in Mary Poppins’ hands.

MICHAEL:

I am not!

Mary Poppins thrusts the tape under Michael’s nose.

MARY POPPINS:

See for yourself.

INSERT–THE MEASURING TAPE

which reads “EXTREMELY STUBBORN AND SUSPICIOUS”

MICHAEL:

(reading with difficulty o.s.) Extremely stub-stubborn and sus....

MED. CLOSE JANE AND MICHAEL

Mary Poppins moves around Jane, who is giggling at Michael’s reaction. She leans down and measures Jane from head to toe, and reads from the tape.

MARY POPPINS:

(reading tape) Rather inclined to giggle. Doesn’t put things away.

Michael starts to laugh, enjoying Jane’s embarrassment.

INSERT–THE MEASURING TAPE

which reads “RATHER INCLINED TO GIGGLE. DOESN’T PUT THINGS AWAY”.

CLOSE ON JANE AND MICHAEL 150-B

as they look up at Mary Poppins, o.s. Michael asks critically—

MICHAEL:

(to Mary Poppins) How about you?

CLOSE ON MARY POPPINS

as she holds out the end of the tape to Michael.

MARY POPPINS:

Very well. Hold this for me.

WIDER ANGLE–JANE AND MICHAEL

as they sit on the floor at Mary Poppins’ feet. Michael holds the tape measure to Mary Poppins’ toe. CAMERA PANS UPWARD as Jane follows the other end of the tape measure, which Mary

Poppins holds to the top of her own head. CAMERA MOVES IN CLOSE on Mary Poppins as she takes the tape measure and reads it.

MARY POPPINS:

(looking at tape measure) Just as I thought—

INSERT–MEASURING TAPE-i

which reads “MARY POPPINS, PRACTICALLY PERFECT IN EVERY WAY”.

MARY POPPINS:

(reading o.s.) Mary Poppins, practically perfect in every way.

CLOSE–JANE AND MICHAEL 151-C

JANE:

Mary Poppins? Is that your name? It’s lovely.

CLOSE ON MARY POPPINS

MARY POPPINS:

Thank you. I’ve always liked it. (consults her lapel watch) Now then, shall we get on with it?

WIDER ANGLE GROUP SHOT

Mary Poppins, followed by the children, walks back to the table and takes an apron from the group of things she has removed from her carpetbag.

JANE:

With what?

MARY POPPINS:

In your advertisement, you did, did you not, specifically request ‘Play Games’?

JANE:

Oh, yes.

MARY POPPINS:

(putting on the apron) Very well. Our first game is called ‘Well begun is half done’.

MICHAEL:

(suspiciously) I don’t like the sound of it.

MARY POPPINS:

(as she moves toward the nursery) Otherwise entitled, ‘Let’s tidy up the nursery’.

CLOSE ON JANE AND MICHAEL

MICHAEL:

(to Jane) I told you she was tricky—

CLOSE ON MARY POPPINS

as she turns to look at the children, before entering nursery.

MARY POPPINS:

Indeed?

CLOSE ON JANE AND MICHAEL 15.

JANE:

It is a game, isn’t it, Mary Poppins?

WIDER ANGLE–GROUP SHOT 155

as Mary Poppins stands looking down at the children.

MARY POPPINS:

That depends on your point of view, doesn’t it? After all—

(singing)

In every job that must be done—

IN THE NURSERY:

as Mary Poppins comes IN, picking up an occasional shoe, rubbing a finger along the edge of the furniture to determine the amount of accumulated dust,

MARY POPPINS:

(singing)

We find an element of fun—

Michael and Jane have stopped at the door to watch. Michael is scornful.

MICHAEL:

(spoken) Fun? Where’s the fun?

MARY POPPINS:

(singing)

We find the fun, and smack!

The job’s a game!

MICHAEL:

I don’t believe it.

MARY POPPINS:

(singing)

And every task we undertake

Becomes a piece of cake

A lark–a spree

It’s very clear to see—

That a spoonful of sugar

Helps the medicine go down

The medicine go down-own

Medicine go down

Just a spoonful of sugar

Helps the medicine go down

In a most delightful way—

(spoken)

Stuffy in here—

She goes to the window and throws it open, looking out.

REVERSE:

on Mary Poppins. A SOUND of a robin o.s.

MARY POPPINS:

Even such a Practically Perfect Person as—

(singing)

A robin feathering his nest

Has very little time to rest—

161 HER VIEW

of a robin and his mate busy with nest building—

MARY POPPINS:

(singing, o.s.)

While gathering

His bits of twine and twig

Though quite intent in his pursuit

He has a merry tune to toot

He knows a song

Will move the job along.

The male robin flies OUT of SCENE toward Mary Poppins—

MARY POPPINS:

reaches down OUT OF SCENE and brings the robin INTO SCENE, perched on her finger. The robin whistles an INTRO and OBLIGATO as Mary Poppins sings the chorus.

MARY POPPINS:

(singing)

For a spoonful of sugar

Helps the medicine go down

The medicine go down-own

Medicine go down

Just a spoonful of sugar

Helps the medicine go down

In a most delightful way—

The robin goes back CUT to finish nis nest, and Mary Poppins closes the window.

Mary Poppins turns to her task in the nursery. With a snap of her fingers, piles of clothing leap off the floor, folding themselves in mid-air, placing themselves in Mary’s hands. Bureau and dresser drawers open to receive them. Weary-looking animals and dolls straighten up. Michael and Jane look on, wide-eyed. Jane wants to help. Dolls and books leap from their scattered places into her arms.

MICHAEL:

(fiercely, in a low tone, to Jane) You can’t play! You’re not a practically perfect person!

JANE:

I don’t care!

Michael hesitates a moment, then can’t stand it any longer. He joins the Tidying-Up Game and is virtually buried under the toys and clothes that leap at him.

MARY POPPINS:

watches the children at work, then moves toward her own room, removing the starched apron as she does—

MARY POPPINS:

Even such Practically Perfect Persons as

(singing)

The honeybees that fetch the nectar

From the flowers to the comb

Never tire of ever buzzing

To and fro.

INT. MARY POPPINS’ ROOM

She stands before her mirror tucking a strand of nair or two in place, intent on her reflection. In the b.g., Michael and Jane are scurrying around the nursery, cleaning up.

MARY POPPINS:

(singing)

Because they take a little nip—

Mary Poppins’s reflection in the mirror SINGS the next line.

MARY POPPINS:

(her reflection singing)

Of every flower that they sip—

Mary Poppins and her reflection sing the next line together.

MARY POPPINS AND HER REFLECTION

(singing)

And hence

They find

Their task is not a grind!

Mary Poppins begins to WHISTLE, putting on her hat. She comes INTO the nursery.

IN THE NURSERY:

Mary Poppins picks up the children’s hat and coats. She glances at her lapel watch.

MARY POPPINS:

Kindly do not daily. Time is getting on.

With her umbrella, Mary Poppins TAPS OUT time, picking up the TEMPO of the music. Now the nursery fairly hums with the SPEEDED-UP activity. Shoes spring up, assorting and reassorting, marching into closets—the bed makes itself, the bureau tidies itself up at a stern glance from Mary Poppins. Toys race into their proper places, and there is a final frenzied burst of activity. Mary Poppins turns AWAY—but there is a secondary frenzy of movements as the toys, bureau drawers, doors, keep opening and shutting, reluctant to give up the game. Mary Poupins turns, watching it all haughtily for a moment. Everything subsides under her gaze.

MARY POPPINS:

(icily) If you’re quite finished!

MICHAEL:

(exuberant) Let’s do that again!

He picks up an armload of toys and is about to hurl them back onto the floor.

MARY POPPINS:

(consulting her lapel watch) That will be sufficient, thank you. It is time for our outing in the Park.

MICHAEL:

I don’t want an outing! I want to tidy up the nursery again!

The toys wriggle out of his arms and back onto the shelves.

MARY POPPINS:

(calmly) Hats and coats, please. Spit spot! Spit spot! Off we go!

WIDER ANGLE–GROUP SHOT

CAMERA PANS WITH them as Mary Poppins leads the way to the door, with the children marching behind her, hastily putting on their hats and coats.

JANE AND MICHAEL

(singing)

For a spoonful of sugar

Helps the medicine go down—

As Mary Poppins goes OUT the door, CAMERA MOVES IN CLOSER on Jane and Michael as they hurry after her.

JANE AND MICHAEL

(singing)

Medicine go down-own—

EXT. SECOND FLOOR LANDING

Ellen is dusting the balustrade. She looks up as she HEARS the o.s. singing.

JANE AND MICHAEL

(singing o.s.)

Medicine go down.

191-A HER VIEW 191-A

of Mary Poppins and the children, as they come sliding down the bannister.

JANE AND MICHAEL

(singing)

Just a spoonful of sugar—

191-3 REVERSE AND CLOSE

on Ellen, as she stands watching them, dumbfounded.

JANE AND. MICHAEL

(singing o.s.)

Helps the medicine go down

In a most delightful way!

WIDER ANGLE:

Ellen stands back as Mary Poppins, Jane and Michael glide PAST her on the bannister. Jane turns to smile at Ellen.

CLOSE ON ELLEN:

as she watches them continue on down the bannister.

HER VIEW–DOWN SHOT

of Mary Poppins and the children, sliding down toward the front door.

REVERE AND CLOSE

on Ellen as she stares wide-eyed at the group.

HER VIEW–DOWN SHOT

of Mary Poppins and the children as they debark gracefully. Led by Mary Poppins, they march toward the front door, which OPENS by itself. Without a pause, Mary Poppins goes OUT the door. The children turn to wave at Ellen, then follow Mary Poppins OUT the door, as it CLOSES by itself behind them.

MED. CLOSE ELLEN

standing on the landing. She looks at the balustrade, then getting an idea, climbs aboard it and starts to sing.

ELLEN:

(singing)

Just a spoonful of sugar—

194 REVERSE SHOT–MRS. BRILL

who has just come INTO the front hall. She looks up in astonishment at Ellen.

ELLEN:

(singing o.s.)

’Elps the medicine go down—

REAR VIEW:

of Ellen, as she slides down the bannister to the front hall, singing and dusting as she goes.

ELLEN:

(singing)

Medicine go down-own—

REVERSE AND CLOSE

on Mrs. Brill, who reacts in horror as she watches Ellen’s descent.

ELLEN:

(singing o.s.)

Medicine go down—

HER VIEW:

of Ellen as she hits the bottom at full speed. She comes off staggering slightly, regains her balance and dances past the astonished eyes of Mrs. Brill, flicking an imaginary bit of dust off her as she goes by, and OUT OF SCENE.

ELLEN:

(singing)

In a most delightful way!

DISSOLVE:

EXT.–ENTRANCE TO THE PARK GATES–DAY–A LONG SHOT

CRANE MOVING DOWN

A carriage passes THROUGH SCENE in f.g. A half-dozen or so portraits and landscapes have been done in colored chalk on the sidewalk near the park wall. The subjects include variously–“Punting on the Thames”, “Henry VIII”, “A Still Life”, “A Country Circus” and other time-worn crowd-pleasers. A placard nearby states modestly, “All My Own Work”. A few passersby stop to look at the pictures, and then continue on their way.

The sidewalk artist is Bert, whom we met in the opening scene as a one-man band. CAMERA MOVES UP BEHIND Bert, revealing him at work on a lovely scene of pastoral England. The bright, fresh colors stand out strongly against the surroundings.

BERT:

(singing)

Chim, chim-in-ey

Chim, chim-in-ey

Chim, chim cher-oo

I does what I likes

And I likes what I do—

(he turns slightly, looking toward CAMERA)

’Ullo, art lovers!

MED. CLOSE–BERT

With bits of chalk fitted to the end of an extension stick, Bert moves around easily and exuberantly, SHADING, defining, artfully improving each picture with a practised hand.

BERT:

(singing)

Today I’m a screever

And as you can see

A screever’s an artist

Of ’ighest degree—

CLOSE–THE CHALK DRAWINGS

BERT:

(singing o.s.)

And it’s all me own work

From me own memory—

CLOSE ON BERT:

BERT:

(speaking)

Not Royal Academy, I suppose— Still they’re better than a finger in the eye, ain’t they?

WIDER ANGLE–BERT

as he dances from portrait to portrait, using the extension stick to touch-up and improve them.

BERT:

(singing)

Chim, chim-in-ey

Chim, chim-in-ey

Chim, chien-cheroo

I drawers wot I likes

And I likes wot I drew—

MED. CLOSE–BERT

as he gets down on his knees. Putting the extension stick aside, he selects a few colored chalks from a pile, and quickly draws another picture.

BERT:

(singing)

No remuneration

Does I ask of you

But me cap would be glad

Of a copper or two—

INSERT:

of the picture Bert has just completed. He places his cap in the middle of the picture, which has a banner running across the top reading, “ALL CONTRIBUTIONS WELCOME”.

BERT:

(singing o.s.)

Me cap would be glad

Of a copper or two—

DOWN SHOT–SILHOUETTES

of Mary Poppins and the children, as they appear on the pavement.

BERT:

(singing o.s.)

Chim chim-in-ey

Chim chim-in-ey—

As Mary Poppins’ silhouette appears over the portrait on which Bert is working—

BERT:

(spoken) Wait! ’Old it! Stay right where you are!

202-A INSERT–MARY POPPINS’ SILHOUETTE 202-

as Bert’s hand traces around it.

BERT:

(o.s.) I’d know that silhouette anywhere!

CLOSE–BERT

BERT:

(looking up) Mary Poppins!

GROUP SHOT–MARY POPPINS,. BERT AND THE CHILDREN

MARY POPPINS:

It’s nice to see you again, Bert. I expect you know Jane and Michael.

BERT:

Well, I’ve seen them ’ere and about—chasin’ a kite last time, weren’t it?

Jane and Michael respond with a small curtsy and bow.

CLOSE–JANE AND MICHAEL

JANE:

Mary Poppins is taking us to the Park.

CLOSE ON BERT:

BERT:

To the Park? Not if I know Mary Poppins! Other nannies take children to parks....

CLOSE ON CHILDREN 204-C

as they react to Bert’s words.

BERT:

(o.s.) But when you’re with Mary Poppins—suddenly— you’re in places you never dreamed of—and quick as you can say, ‘Bob’s your uncle!’–the most unusual things begin to ’appen!

CLOSE ON MARY POPPINS

MARY POPPINS:

(loftily) I’m sure I haven’t the faintest idea what you’re talking about.

GROUP SHOT–BERT, MARY POPPINS AND THE CHILDREN

BERT:

Mind you, it’s not my place to conjecture, but what she probably ’as in mind is a jolly ’oliday somewhere or other. (leading the children over to the drawings) Something along these lines, I shouldn’t be surprised—

As the children look down at the drawings, Bert smiles at Mary Poppins.

INSERT:

of the chalk drawing, “Punting on the Thames”.

BERT:

(o.s.) Punting on the Thames— that’s always good, if you like outings.

MED. CLOSE–BERT AND THE CHILDREN

with his drawing stick, Bert mimes the fellow poling the boat in the drawing for the entertainment of the children. He pretends the pole becomes stuck in the mud, clambers on it and falls. The children laugh.

BERT:

(clambering on the pole) River’s a bit sticky today—

CLOSE ON MARY POPPINS

MARY POPPINS:

(severely) Bert, I’ll thank you not to stuff their heads with your nonsense.

209 MED. CLOSE–BERT AND MICHAEL 209

Bert kneels down before another chalk drawing—

BERT:

(indicating drawing) The circus! ‘Ow about a lovely circus? Lions and tigers’,—

210 INSERT 210

A chalk drawing of a small country circus. A man on a unicycle is performing.

BERT:

(o.s.) World famous artistes, performing death-defying feats of dexterity and skill before your very eyes!

MED. CLOSE BERT AND MICHAEL

Mimicking the action of the picture, Bert pretends to ride a unicycle for the benefit of the amused boy.

CLOSE ON MARY POPPINS

who looks on, disapprovingly.

CLOSE ON JANE:

as she looks down at one of the other chalk drawings.

JANE:

Oh–that’s lovely! If you please, I’d much rather go there—

Bert and Michael come up behind Jane to look over her shoulder at the drawing.

BERT:

Beautiful, ain’t it?

INSERT:

of the pastoral drawing—

BERT:

(o.s.) A typical English countryside, as done by a true and lovin’ ’and. Wot’s more, tho you can’t see it, there’s a little country fair down that road and over the hill.

CLOSE ON BERT AND THE CHILDREN

looking down at the picture.

MICHAEL:

(critically) I don’t see any road—

BERT:

Wot? No road?

INSERT–THE DRAWING

as Bert’s HAND comes INTO SCENE, and deftly sketches a road down the center of the picture.

BERT:

(o.s.) One country road—suitable for travel and ’igh adventure:

GROUP SHOT–BERT, MARY POPPINS AND THE CHILDREN

Jane and Michael are clamoring and bounding about Mary Poppins.

MICHAEL:

May we go, Mary Poppins? Please: May we?

JANE:

It’s such a lovely place. Don’t you think it’s lovely, Mary Poppins?

BERT AND THE CHILDREN

BERT:

Now’s the time, Mary Poppins! No one’s looking:

MICHAEL AND JANE

Please, Mary Poppins. Please!

CLOSE ON MARY POPPINS

MARY POPPINS:

I have no intention of making a spectacle of myself, thank you.

CLOSE ON BERT AND THE CHILDREN

BERT:

(conspiratorial, to Jane and Michael) Then I’ll do it myself.

JANE AND MICHAEL

Do what?

BERT:

(matching the action to the words) Bit of magic. It’s easy!

‘You wink—

‘You think—

‘You do a double blink—

MED. CLOSE–BERT AND THE CHILDREN

He takes their hands, and gets ready to jump -

BERT:

(closing his eyes) ‘You close your eyes and—

WIDER ANGLE–BERT AND THE CHILDREN

CAMERA SHOOTING FROM BEHIND, as holding hands, they all jump into the chalk drawing—

BERT:

Jump!

They land in the middle of the drawing, but much to Bert’s surprise, nothing happens.

MED. CLOSE–BERT AND THE CHILDREN

Jane and Michael stand looking up at Pert questioningly.

JANE:

Is something supposed to happen?

CLOSE ON MARY POPPINS

MARY POPPINS:

(severely) Bert, what utter nonsense!

BERT, MARY POPPINS AND THE CHILDREN

Mary Poppins opens her umbrella, and steps over to where Bert and the children are standing next to the pastoral scene.

MARY POPPINS:

Why do you always complicate things that are really quite simple?

MED. CLOSE–GROUP SHOT

Mary Poppins holds her umbrella over the group, as they stand in front of the drawing.

MARY POPPINS:

Give me your hand, please! Michael, don’t slouch: One–two—

GROUP SHOT–WIDER ANGLE

On the count of three, they all leap up together, and INTO the chalk drawing.

MARY POPPINS:

Three!

They rapidly diminish in SIZE, landing on the chalk road in the drawing, as a cloud of colored chalk goes up, momentarily obscuring their arrival.

EXT. ENGLISH COUNTRYSIDE–MARY POPPINS, BERT AND CHILDREN 3H-1

A stylized version of the pastoral SCENE—done in chalk tones and hues. As the chalk dust settles, Mary Poppins and the others look at each other in delight and surprise, as they stand in the middle of a winding country road.

Mary Poppins, looking a great deal younger, is dressed in the airiest of fashion. A large sweeping hat, with a long curling feather, shoes with diamond buckles, fine white gloves, and a silk umbrella make up an ensemble to dazzle the eye.

Bert too, is younger looking. He looks scrubbed and shining in white flannels, red and green blazer, straw boater and cane. Michael and Jane, save for the chalky hue to their clothes, are much the same.

From o.s. comes the faint SOUND of merry-go-round MUSIC.

BERT AND MARY POPPINS

BERT:

(turning to Mary) Mary Poppins! You look beautiful!

MARY POPPINS:

(pleased) Do I really?

BERT:

You do, for fair! Like the first day I met you.

CLOSE ON MARY POPPINS

MARY POPPINS:

You look fine, too, Bert.

CLOSE ON BERT:

as he reacts with pleasure, flicking the brim of his boater.

JANE:

JANE:

(looking around)

Everything’s so lovely!

MICHAEL:

MICHAEL (to Bert)

I thought you said there was a fair.

BERT AND MARY POPPINS

BERT:

(using his cane to point the way)

So I did. Down the road, and over the hill, remember?

JANE AND MICHAEL

Jane takes Michael’s hand, and they start out in the direction Bert has indicated.

JANE:

Come on:
I hear the music from the merry-go-round:

As they disappear over a hill—

BERT AND MARY POPPINS

BERT:

Tell ’em Bert sent you!

MARY POPPINS (calling)

Don’t fall down and smudge the drawing!

Bert takes Mary Poppins’ arm, and they start down the road.

BERT AND MARY POPPINS

as they walk along the country road.

BERT:

(singing)

Ain’t it a glorious day:

Right as a mornin’ in May–

CLOSER–BERT AND MARY POPPINS

They are joined by a bird, who flits gaily around them. Mary Poppins looks on as Bert flaps his arms in imitation of the bird.

BERT:

(singing)

I feel like I could fly!

BERT AND MARY POPPINS–LONGER ANGLE

As Bert starts to waft upward, Mary Poppins reaches for his coat, pulling him down.

MARY POPPINS:

(spoken) None of your larking about, now—

BERT:

(singing)

Have you ever seen—

BERT AND MARY POPPINS–WIDER ANGLE

BERT:

(singing, gestures with his cane)

The grass so green? Or a bluer sky!

BERT AND MARY POPPINS–CLOSER ANGLE

BERT:

(singing)

Oh, it’s a Jolly ‘Oliday with Mary

Mary makes your ’eart so light—

CLOSE ON MARY POPPINS

MARY POPPINS:

(spoken) Haven’t changed a bit, have you?

CLOSE ON BERT:

BERT:

(singing)

When the day is gray and ordinary—

WIDER ANGLE–BERT AND MARY POPPINS

as they stroll along the path through the countryside.

BERT:

(singing)

Mary makes the sun shine bright—

MARY POPPINS (spoken)

Oh, give over, Bert—

BERT:

(singing)

’Appiness is bloomin’ all around ’er–

The daffodils are smilin’ at the dove—

REVERSE–MARY POPPINS AND BERT

BERT:

(singing)

When Mary ’olds your ’and

You feel so grand—

CLOSE ON BERT:

as he places his hand inside his coat over his heart, and demonstrates its palpatations. With his cane he beats out the rhythm on the top of his boater, forcing it down over his eyes.

BERT:

(singing)

Your ‘eart starts beating

Like a big brass band—

CLOSE ON MARY POPPINS

MARY POPPINS:

(spoken) Light-headed, that’s what you are.

MARY POPPINS AND BERT

BERT:

(singing)

Oh, it’s a Jolly

‘Oliday with Mary

No wonder that it’s Mary that we love!

WIDER ANGLE–MARY POPPINS AND BERT

They have come to a stile separating the lane from a small farmyard. Bert lifts Mary Poppins onto the stile, and is PULLED OVER himself by the energy of his gesture.

BERT AND A GROUP OF FARM ANIMALS

who gather around to add their tributes to Mary Poppins.

ANIMAL AD-LIBS

’Ear ’Ear!— Right y’are!

MARY POPPINS AND BERT

Mary PoPpins sits on the fence, watching approvingly as Bert, using his cane as a baton, leads the animals in song.

A LARGE RAM:

RAM:

(singing)

Oh, it’s a Jolly

‘Oliday with Mary—

WIDER ANGLE–MARY POPPINS, BERT AND THREE LAMBS

The lambs bound past Mary Poppins and Bert.

LAMBS:

(singing)

Mary makes your ‘ears so light!

A DRAY HORSE:

DRAY HORSE:

(singing)

When the day is gray and ordinary—

He is joined by a COW.

COW:

(singing)

Mary makes the sun shine bright—

A TRIO OF GEESE:

TRIO OF GEESE:

(singing)

’Appiness is bloomin’ all around her—

The geese scatter as a PIG intrudes to add his praises.

PIG:

The daffodils are smiling at the dove.

Snort! Snort!

WIDE ANGLE GROUP SHOT–MARY POPPINS, BERT AND THE ANIMALS

Bert helps Mary Poppins down from the fence, and the animals all join in with him to sing the chorus.

BERT AND ANIMALS

(singing)

When Mary ’olds your ’and

You feel so grand—

(Bert leads Mary Poppins through the farmyard)

You’re ‘eart starts beating

Like a big brass band—

GROUP SHOT–DRAY HORSE AND ANIMALS

Using his hoof, the dray horse beats out the rhythm on a washtub hanging against the barn wall.

DRAY HORSE:

Bang! Bang! Bang! Bang!

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Bill Walsh & Don DaGradi

Don DaGradi (March 1, 1911 – August 4, 1991) was a Disney writer who started out as a layout artist on 1940s cartoons including "Der Fuehrer's Face" in 1943. He eventually moved into animated features with the film Lady and the Tramp in 1955. He also worked as a color and styling or sequence consultant on many other motion pictures for Disney. His greatest achievement was for his visual screenplay for Mary Poppins in 1964 for which he shared an Oscar nomination for Best Adapted Screenplay with Bill Walsh. Don DaGradi died August 4, 1991, in Friday Harbor, Washington. He was named a Disney Legend posthumously, only months after his death. more…

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"Mary Poppins" Scripts.com. STANDS4 LLC, 2017. Web. 18 Nov. 2017. <http://www.scripts.com/script/mary_poppins_1140>.

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