Little Women script
Little Women (1994)
Synopsis: Little Women is a 1994 American family drama film directed by Gillian Armstrong. The screenplay by Robin Swicord is based on the 1868 Louisa May Alcott novel of the same name. It is the fourth feature film adaptation of the Alcott classic, following silent versions released in 1917 and 1918, a 1933 George Cukor-directed release and a 1949 adaptation by Mervyn LeRoy. It was released exclusively on December 21, 1994, and was released nationwide four days later on December 25, 1994, by Columbia Pictures.

MRS. MARCH

So you're going to Washington?

MAN:

Yes, Ma'am. My son is sick in a hospital there.

MRS. MARCH

Oh. This will be an anxious Christmas for you. I think this one

will do. Let's try this. Is it your only son?

MAN:

No, Ma'am. I had four, two were killed. One is a prisoner.

MRS. MARCH

You've done a great deal for your country, sir.

MAN:

Oh, not a might more than I ought to, Ma'am. I'd go myself if I

was any use. Thank you for the overcoat.

MRS. MARCH

Wait a minute. I hope you find him better.

MAN:

Thank you, Ma'am. God bless you. Merry Christmas. Merry

Christmas.

MRS. MARCH

Merry Christmas.

(00:
03:22)**

SHOP ASSISTANT:

Oh, Mrs. March. Will you sign this so I can get it off? Why,

what's the matter?

MRS. MARCH

When I see things like that poor old man it makes me ashamed to

think how little I do.

SHOP ASSISTANT:

But, my dear, you're doing all you can here. And your husband is

there.

MRS. MARCH

Yes, I know. His last son is lying ill miles away waiting to say

goodbye to him, forever perhaps, while I have my four girls to

comfort me.

SHOP ASSISTANT:

And a real comfort they are too, aren't they?

MRS. MARCH

I couldn't bear it without them. Meg and Joe are working, you

know?

SHOP ASSISTANT:

Yes?

MRS. MARCH

Meg is a nursery governess.

SHOP ASSISTANT:

Oh.

(at the Nursery)**

CHILD ONE:

Merry Christmas.

CHILD TWO:

Merry Christmas.

CHILD TWO:

Merry Christmas.

(00:
04:15)**

MEG:

Remember Lilly, Santa Claus is watching you.

CHILD FOUR:

Come on Tony, let's go over to the blackboard.

(at Aunt March's)**

JO:

We know as well what are the baneful fruits of selfishness and

self- indulgence. Bad habits take root with fearful rapidity even

in the richest natures. They grow and ripen and bear their fruit

like southern vines and weeds. Al_c Almost in a single day and

night. Crush them. Pluck them out pitterlously from their very

first appearance and do not weary of the labor of plucking them

out again and again.

(00:
05:06)**

(Bird talks)**

(00:
05:15)**

AUNT MARCH:

Hold your tongue! Disrespectful old bird. Go on, Josephine_c.

Josephine? Uh! Where you off to, Miss?

JO:

Oh, I didn't think you'd mind. It was nearly time to leave and

the girls all said they'd be home early so we could rehearse my

play for Christmas.

AUNT MARCH:

Never a thought about my Christmas. Flying off without a word of

cheer or greeting to your poor old aunt.

JO:

Oh, I'm sorry, Aunt March. Merry Christmas.

AUNT MARCH:

Merry Christmas. Here! It's a dollar for each. Well, take 'em.

JO:

Thank you, Auntie.

AUNT MARCH:

Never mind thanking me. Just spend it wisely. That's all I ask.

Although it's more than I can expect when you're so much like

your father, waltzing off to war and lettin' other folks look

after his family.

JO:

There's nobody looking after us, and we don't ask favors from

anybody. And I'm very proud of Father. And you should be too.

AUNT MARCH:

Hoity Toity. Don't you be impertinent, miss!

JO:

Oh, I'm sorry, Auntie.

AUNT MARCH:

It isn't preachers that's going to win this war. It's fighters.

JO:

Yes, Auntie. Can I go now?

AUNT MARCH:

Oh, go on. Did you clean Polly's cage today?

JO:

Yes, Auntie.

AUNT MARCH:

Did you wash those tea cups and put them away, carefully?

JO:

Yes, Auntie.

AUNT MARCH:

You didn't break any?

JO:

No, Auntie.

AUNT MARCH:

What about the teaspoons?

JO:

I polished them.

AUNT MARCH:

Oh, very well then. Just a minute. Come back here. Look at this.

You haven't dusted properly. I want this stair rail dusted and

polished before you leave here.

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Robin Swicord

Robin Stender Swicord (born October 23, 1952) is an American screenwriter and film director. She is known for literary adaptions.In 2008, her screenplay for The Curious Case of Benjamin Button was nominated for Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay and Golden Globe Award for Best Screenplay. She wrote the screenplay for the film Memoirs of a Geisha, based on the novel of the same name by Arthur Golden, for which she won a 2005 Satellite Award. Her other screenplay credits include Little Women, Practical Magic, Matilda, The Perez Family, and Shag. more…

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"Little Women" Scripts.com. STANDS4 LLC, 2017. Web. 24 Nov. 2017. <http://www.scripts.com/script/little_women_991>.

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