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12 Angry Men (1957)
Synopsis: Following the closing arguments in a murder trial, the 12 members of the jury must deliberate, with a guilty verdict meaning death for the accused, an inner-city teen. As the dozen men try to reach a unanimous decision while sequestered in a room, one juror (Henry Fonda) casts considerable doubt on elements of the case. Personal issues soon rise to the surface, and conflict threatens to derail the delicate process that will decide one boy's fate.

CHARACTERS:

FOREMAN:
A small, petty man who is impressed with the authority he has and handles himself quite

formally. Not overly bright, but dogged.

JUROR NO. 2:
A meek, hesitant man who finds it difficult to maintain any opinions of his own. Easily swayed

and usually adopts the opinion of the last person to whom he has spoken.

JUROR NO. 3:
A very strong, very forceful, extremely opinionated man within whom can be detected a streak

of sadism. He is a humorless man who is intolerant of opinions other than his own and accustomed to forcing

his wishes and views upon others.

JUROR NO. 4:
Seems to be a man of wealth and position. He is a practiced speaker who presents himself well

at all times. He seems to feel a little bit above the rest of the jurors. His only concern is with the facts in this

case, and he is appalled at the behavior of the others.

JUROR NO. 5:
A naive, very frightened young man who takes his obligations in this case very seriously but,

who finds it difficult to speak up when his elders have the floor.

JUROR NO. 6:
An honest but dull-witted man who comes upon his decisions slowly and carefully. A man who

finds it difficult to create positive opinions, but who must listen to and digest and accept those opinions offered

by others which appeal to him most.

JUROR NO. 7:
A loud, flashy-handed salesman type who has more important things to do than to sit on a jury.

He is quick to show temper, quick to form opinions on things about which he knows nothing. Is a bully and, of

course, a coward.

JUROR NO. 8:
A quiet, thoughtful, gentle man. A man who sees all sides of every question and constantly

seeks the truth. A man of strength tempered with compassion. Above all, he is a man who wants justice to be

done and will fight to see that it is.

JUROR NO. 9:
A mild gentle old man long since defeated by life and now merely waiting to die. A man who

recognizes himself for what he is and mourns the days when it would have been possible to be courageous

without shielding himself behind his many years.

JUROR NO. 10 An angry, bitter man. He is man who antagonizes almost at sight. A bigot who places no

values on any human life save his own, a man who has been nowhere and is going nowhere and knows it deep

within him.

JUROR NO. 11:
A refugee from Europe who has come to this country in 1941. A man who speaks with an

accent and who is ashamed humble, almost subservient to the people around him, but who will honestly seek

justice because he has suffered through so much injustice.

Juror NO. 12:
A slick, bright advertising man who thinks of human beings in terms of percentages graphs, and

polls and has no real understanding of people. He is a superficial snob, but trying to be a good fellow.

NO. 12:
A slick, bright advertising man who thinks of human beings in terms of percentages graphs, and

polls and has no real understanding of people. He is a superficial snob, but trying to be a good fellow.

ACT 1

Fade in on a jury box. Twelve men are seated in it, listening intently to the voice of the judge as he charges

them. We do not see the judge. He speaks in slow, measured tones, and his voice is grave. The camera drifts

over the faces of the jurymen as the judge speaks, and we see that most of their heads are turned to camera's

left. NO. 7 looks down at his hands. NO. 3 looks off in another direction, the direction in which the defendant

would be sitting. NO. 10 keeps moving his head back and forth nervously. The judge drones on.

JUDGE:
Murder in the first degree—premeditated homicide—is the most serious charge tried in our criminal

courts. You've heard a long and complex case, gentlemen, and it is now your duty to sit down to try and

separate the facts from the fancy. One man is dead. The life of another is at stake. If there is a reasonable doubt

in your minds as to the guilt of the accused . . . then you must declare him not guilty. If, however, there is no

reasonable doubt, then he must be found guilty. Whichever way you decide, the verdict must be unanimous. I

urge you to deliberate honestly and thoughtfully. You are faced with a grave responsibility. Thank you,

gentlemen.

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Reginald Rose

Reginald Rose was an American film and television writer most widely known for his work in the early years of television drama. Rose's work is marked by its treatment of controversial social and political issues. more…

All Reginald Rose scripts | Reginald Rose Books

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"12 Angry Men Movie Script" Scripts.com. STANDS4 LLC, 2017. Web. 28 May 2017. <http://www.scripts.comscript/58>.

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